Indigenous Communities

Job – Aboriginal Child Youth and Mental Wellness Coordinator, at Okanagan Nation Alliance

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Job Posting (PDF): acymh-job-posting-september-2016ACYMH Job Posting  - September 2016.jpg

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Graduate Research Assistant Project: Research in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Due: Aug 5, 2016

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The UBC Learning Exchange (http://learningexchange.ubc.ca) is seeking a Graduate Research Assistant (GRA) at Master’s or PhD level for one year to provide research support to the Academic Director. 

The Learning Exchange is core to UBC’s Downtown Eastside (DTES) campus and works to engage, inspire and lead local residents, students, faculty and organizations to work and learn together.  This GRA position will focus on issues of research in the DTES.  The project provides an excellent opportunity for a graduate student to develop expertise in community-based participatory research and knowledge exchange involving people who are marginalized and live in an area that has been stigmatized. The graduate student will be responsible for supporting all aspects of the Making Research Accessible initiative.

Hours: 15hrs/week    Pay: $1250 – $1350 per month.     Starting beginning of September

Deadline: Friday, August 5, 2016

Apply: Submit letter of interest and résumé to Dr. Angela Towle, Academic Director (angela.towle@ubc.ca)

Further information: http://learningexchange.ubc.ca/2016/07/19/were-hiring-graduate-research-assistant/

Course: Researching in Cross-Cultural and Global Contexts

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EDCP 508 (031): Researching in Cross-Cultural and Global Contexts open to all students

The focus of this advanced research methodology course is to guide students in the design and enactment of cross-cultural research with Indigenous and other marginalized peoples in local and global contexts. While mainstream research primarily privileges the generation of new knowledge, there is growing call for re-generation of the ‘ten thousand different voices’ that still exist on this planet to address global social and ecological injustices and other critical issues facing life on earth. These knowledges are based on millennia of observation and lived experiences that bring together human, non-human and more-than-human intelligences and agencies, gesturing toward radically reimagined and enacted research affiliations, relationships and responsibilities.   

 

This course offers students an opportunity to examine the challenges of conducting research across different worldviews, knowledge systems, languages, geographies, and ecologies. In this era of epistemic hegemony, neoliberalism, global capitalism and climate change, students will consider research method(ologie)s and research projects that promote equity, social and environmental justice, and living in a good way with all our relations. Students will critically reflect on their own philosophical, historical, cultural, epistemological, ontological, and relational life narratives and how they influence the methodological shaping of their own research projects. It is recommended that students come to this course having already completed EDUC 500: Introduction to Research Methodologies.

Winter Term 1, 2016   Day: Monday   Time: 4:40PM – 7:30PM

Professor: Dr. Peter Cole     peter.cole@ubc.ca

Million-acre St. Lawrence Island land title signed over to native population

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By Travis Khachatoorian / KTUU |

SAINT LAWRENCE ISLAND, Alaska – In one of the biggest land conveyances in US history, the federal government officially signed the title to Saint Lawrence Island over to its native population.

More than one million acres of land was researched and surveyed by the Bureau of Land Management in preparation for the title transfer. Using GPS mapping and aerial photography, the BLM took three years to complete the process before handing over ownership of the island.

“This is the largest survey we have ever done, and the fourth largest conveyance that the US government has ever done in one fell swoop,” said BLM director Neil Kornze.

Multiple BLM officials from Washington DC, Anchorage and Nome flew into the villages of Gambell and Savoonga on Wednesday for an official document signing ceremony. The conveyance of land finalizes a process the Alaska Natives of St. Lawrence Island have been waiting for since President Nixon signed the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971 (ANCSA.)

“The descendants of our forefathers would have clapped their hands just like we did with the signing of the patent,” said Gambell village elder Branson Tungiyan.

With the title in hand, the villages of Gambell and Savoonga will share ownership of the sixth biggest island in the US.

Full ownership of the island was a decision made by the village elders decades ago. When ANCSA first passed, villages across Alaska were offered a piece of a near billion dollar settlement to sell large portions of their land to the federal government.

Savoonga and Gambell elders opted out of the payout. Instead they received no money, no opportunity to become part of a larger regional native corporation, but rather received opportunity to own the former St. Lawrence Island Reserve, now giving them 900 miles of coastline, mountains and lakes.

“One of the things [the elders] told us is, ‘as long as you are owners of the island, the island will take care of you,’” said president of Kukulget Corporation Perry Pungowiyi.

“You keep the land instead of the money, because money runs out,” said Tungiyan.

The BLM gave the native population interim conveyance of the land in 1979, only to receive the final title when the government finished its survey of the land. The survey for St. Lawrence Island wasn’t completed until 2016.

“The ANCSA entitlement in total [statewide] was about 44 million acres, and that’s roughly the equivalent size of the State of Washington,” said Erika Reed, Alaska BLM deputy state director of lands, cadastral survey and pipeline monitoring. “That’s about the acreage that we’ve been surveying and conveying over the last 45 years.”

Pungowiyi said, so far there’s no plans for greater development of the island. He said, most important to the village at this point is to preserve the land their ancestors have inhabited for thousands of years.

“This is home. This is where I live. I feel at peace when I’m here. I have no worries other than fish and game,” said Pungowiyi. “Here it still feels like we’re living with our ancestors.”

Source: KTUU. Retrieved from: http://www.ktuu.com/content/news/Massive-land-transfer-388618852.html on August 1, 2016

Call for papers, Duranbinjma-Burre: International Indigenous Knowledge Conference, Australia. Due: Sept 30, 2016

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THE WEARURUK RESEARCH CENTRE

INSTITUTE OF KOORIE EDUCATION DEAKIN UNIVERSITY AUSTRALIA CALL FOR PAPERS

Duranbinjma-Burre: International Indigenous Knowledge Conference Australia 26 – 28 June 2017

The interdisciplinary conference, Duranbinjma-Burre: International Indigenous Knowledge Conference Australia to be hosted by the Wearuruk Research Centre at the Institute of Koorie Education Deakin University will examine the impact of Indigenous Knowledge systems and approaches to research across the disciplines of the Humanities and Creative Arts, Education, Health, Law and Philosophy. It aims to extend debates on how Indigenous ontology and epistemology articulate modes of knowledge production that give rise to transforming discourses and have the capacity to solve real world problems.

Leading and emerging Scholars from Australia and overseas will extend the frontiers of this burgeoning paradigm of research through debates on how Indigenous knowledge systems have the potential to reframe western approaches to knowledge by articulating the implications, applications and benefits of indigenous research both within and beyond Indigenous communities and research arenas.

Duranbinjma-Burre denotes the idea of the growing up and nurturing of persons, ideas and entities. This notion is aligned with our aim of illuminating and advancing Indigenous Paradigms of knowledge production and transmission. The question of what new knowledge and understandings Indigenous approaches can reveal that may not be revealed by other modes of research underpins the objectives of this conference. Further questions outlined below and that provide a framework for articulating this are based on the work a group of postgraduate researchers from the Institute of Koorie Education, Deakin University Australia.

Keynote Speakers:

Reality

Distinguished Professor Hingangaroa Smith is an internationally renowned Māori educationalist who has been at the forefront of the alternative Māori initiatives in the education field and beyond. Professor Smith has made significant contributions to the political, social, economic and cultural advancement of Māori communities. He has also worked extensively with other indigenous/ First Nations peoples across the world, including Canada, Hawaii, US mainland, Taiwan, Chile, Australia and the Pacific nations.

Pausauraq Jana Harcharek has worked with the North Slope Borough School District (NSBSD) in the department of Iñupiaq Education for over fifteen years. During this time she facilitated a number of long-term projects including the Iñupiaq Education Initiative that resulted in the development of the Iñupiaq Learning Framework (ILF). Jana has been a critical force in promoting and maintaining the Iñupiaq culture, language and way of life in education.

Professor Norm Sheehan is a Wiradjuri man born in Mudgee NSW. In 2013 Professor Sheehan commenced as Director of Gnibi College of Indigenous Australian Peoples Southern Cross University. Norm’s current Respectful Design research seeks to outline and employ culturally recognisable and affirming methods to activate cultural growth and redirection within communities.

• What is reality? How is it seen and how do meanings emerge from Australian Indigenous Knowledge systems? Art and Symbols

  • What is the importance of symbols, story-telling and art in Indigenous research?
  • How are natural, symbolic, material, spiritual and ceremonial entities related in Indigenous Knowledge systems?
  • How is time viewed in Indigenous Epistemology and ontology?

    Experience

  • In what ways does the researcher’s lived experience influence and validate knowledge emerging from research
  • How does the researcher’s experience operate in relation to the experience of others? Positioning
  • How are men and women positioned in relation to Land and Country?
  • Who is seen and heard in Indigenous research?
  • How do visible/invisible and outsider/insider relations operate
  • Who benefits from the research? Who controls the research and the emergent knowledge?

    Abstracts of 250 words are invited for single authored or co- authored 20–minute presentations that address (though not exclusively nor comprehensively) the above questions for consideration through double blind refereeing. Please also include the title of your paper, a 150- word biography, institutional affiliation and full contact details with your submission
    Presenters will later be invited to submit full papers to be refereed for publication in full conference proceedings.

Please send abstracts by 30 September 2016: Ms Julie Nichols Email: j.nichols@deakin.edu.au

 

 

 

 

Musqueam Post dedicated at UBC Vancouver campus

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Musqueam artist Brent Sparrow Jr. carved the new Musqueam Post during UBC’s Centennial year. Photo credit: Reese Muntean

The Musqueam people and the University of British Columbia acknowledged their developing partnership today with the dedication of a striking cedar post installed prominently on the Point Grey campus, which is located on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Musqueam people.

Carved by talented Musqueam artist, Brent Sparrow Jr., the post tells an origin story of the Musqueam involving a two-headed serpent.

“We cherish the relationship between the university and the Musqueam,” said Musqueam Chief Wayne Sparrow. “As UBC is on our traditional territory, it’s important that we work together closely to share our culture and look for opportunities to work together.”

The new Musqueam post is now installed, facing east towards the new Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre and the campus entrance, at the foot of a cascading water feature at University Boulevard and East Mall.

“This beautiful post will serve as a permanent welcome to all visitors to these grounds and as a reminder of our relationship with the Musqueam people who were here long before UBC’s history began,” said Interim President Martha Piper. “Its dedication, one of the closing events of UBC’s Centennial year, points towards renewed—and stronger—relationships in the future.”

The land upon which UBC and the post are situated has always been a place of learning for the Musqueam people, where culture, history, and traditions have been passed from one generation to the next.

A time-lapse video of the installation of the Musqueam post can be viewed here: https://youtu.be/1ii_DjN1kz8

A photo gallery of the creation of the Musqueam post can be viewed here: http://100.ubc.ca/galleries/musqueam-post/

For more on the post and the history of the Musqueam-UBC relationship, see http://centennial.aboriginal.ubc.ca

For more about partnership between the Musqueam and UBC, including academic courses and youth programs, visit: http://aboriginal.ubc.ca/community-youth/musqueam-and-ubc/

Brent Sparrow Jr. speaks about the Musqueam Post:

“This qeqən (post) tells the story of the origin of our name xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam). The old people spoke of a small lake called xʷməm̓qʷe:m (Camosun Bog) where the sʔi:ɬqəy̓ (double-headed serpent) originated. They were warned as youth to be cautious and not go near or they would surely die. This sʔi:ɬqəy̓ was so massive its winding path from the lake to the stal̕əw̓ (river) became the creek flowing through Musqueam to this day. Everything the serpent passed over died and from its droppings bloomed a new plant, the məθkʷəy̓. For this reason the people of long ago named that place xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam – place of the məθkʷəy̓)

This qeqən represents our xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) ancestors and our ongoing connection to them and this land through their teachings. The figure is holding the sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s tail to showcase this sχʷəy̓em̓’s (ancient history) passage through generations, relating how we became known as xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) people – People of the məθkʷəy̓ plant. The scalloping reflects the sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s path and trigons represent the unique məθkʷəy̓ plant. The sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s stomach is said to have been as big as a storage basket, designed here as an oval. I drew upon these traditional design elements to depict this rich history.”

Significant Musqueam-UBC milestones

1927: A pair of Musqueam house posts are presented to UBC: http://100.ubc.ca/timeline/musqueam-house-posts-are-presented-to-ubc/

1993: The First Nations Longhouse, built in consultation with Musqueam and many other Aboriginal groups, opens as a gathering place for Aboriginal students and a place of learning for people from the broader community.

2006: The University of British Columbia and the Musqueam Indian Band sign a historic memorandum of affiliation to further the sharing of knowledge and the advancement of Musqueam and Aboriginal youth and adults in post-secondary education.