Indigenous decolonization

Facing ‘colonial history’ key for Indigenous youth: Crime Prevention Ottawa

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Broader cultural education could help steer Indigenous youth away from criminal justice system, author says

CBC News Posted: Feb 14, 2017 4:54 PM ETLast Updated: Feb 14, 2017 8:53 PM ET

Melanie Bania presented the results of her study on preventing the criminalization of Indigenous youth at Ottawa City Hall on Tuesday. (Giacomo Panico/CBC )

A renewed focus on broader cultural education that confronts rather than ignores Canada’s “colonial history” could help steer Indigenous youth away from the criminal justice system, according to a new report by Crime Prevention Ottawa.

The report, titled Culture as Catalyst: Preventing the Criminalization of Indigenous Youth, was released during a presentation at Ottawa City Hall Tuesday morning.

Marc Maracle is the chair of the Ottawa Aboriginal Coalition, which helped lay the groundwork and provide background information for the report. (Roger Dubois/CBC)

According to the report, traumatic events stemming from “colonizing policies” such as the residential school system contribute to the disproportionately high rates of poverty, poor education and unsafe housing experienced by Indigenous people in Canada.
As a result, the paper concludes, Indigenous youth and adults are highly over-represented in the Canadian criminal justice system.
“The research also shows that a connection to culture is very important for all young people, but that for Indigenous people in particular that connection to culture is directly linked to their sense of identity,” said Melanie Bania, the report’s author. Read More…

The Reconciliation Industry: Land Dispossession and Extractivism in an Age of Official Contrition. 6-8pm, Feb 21, 2017.

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The Reconciliation Industry: Land Dispossession and Extractivism in an Age of Official Contrition Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

 

  • Reconciliation has become the watchword of this era of relations between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada. In part that’s because the Truth and Reconciliation Commission has made important contributions to the public understanding of residential schools. But for the Canadian government and industry, what does the rise of reconciliation discourse entail? Is reconciliation a shape-shift in ongoing colonization? What kind of reconciliation is possible if the crime is still in progress?

 

Speakers: Martin Lukacs and Khelsilem and the event will take place on Tuesday, February 21st from 6-8pm in room 1800 at the SFU Harbour Centre. This event is free but registration is required. Please click on the link for more information.

Call for Submissions – Decolonizing Conference at OISE/U of T. Due: June 30, 2016

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CIARS 2016 “DECOLONIZING CONFERENCE”

SAVE THE DATE: November 3-5th, 2016


SUBMISSION
DEADLINE: June 30, 2016

 

The Centre for Integrative Anti-Racism Studies (CIARS) invites submissions for the 2016 “Decolonizing Conference”. The Decolonizing Conference is taking place at OISE/U of T from November 3-5th, 2016, with a pre-conference happening Nov. 2. We invite participation from Faculty, Graduate Students, Undergraduate Students, Artists, and Activists to engage the central theme of the conference, and we offer a wide range of submission categories.
Conference Theme | “Race, Anti-Racism and Indigeneity: Anti-Colonial Resurgence and Decolonial Resistance” 

Speakers | Keynotes Taiaiake Alfred, Joyce E. King, Walter D. Mignolo
Featured Speakers (and more!) |
Haydon King, Jose Aylwin, Andrea Davis, Sandy Grande, Afua Cooper, Carl James, Njoki Wane, Peter McLaren, Lee Maracle, Sherene Razack, Eve Tuck

Submission Categories

1. Individual papers

2. Individual posters

3. Group poster sessions

4. Group panel sessions

5. Workshops (aimed at enhancing Undergraduate/Graduate Student learning)

6. Other Critical Contributions: Arts-based Installations and Other New Media (Poetry, Songs, Dance, audio-based media such as podcasts, Visual media such as Film)


Share with Your Networks!


Like the Decolonizing Conference FB Page
Join the Decolonizing Conference FB Event Page

Visit the website: http://www.decolonizingconference.com/

Download
the PDF of the Full Call for Abstracts online: http://www.decolonizingconference.com/call-for-abstracts(attached)

Register
online: $50 Faculty and $25 Students

+ Decolonizing Conference Poster  (attached)

+ Call for Submissions (attached)

Intertextual Reading Group with Glen Coulthard. 1-2pm, March 8, 2016

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You are invited to join Dr. Glen Coulthard, who will read from his critically acclaimed book, Red Skin, White Masks: Rejecting the Colonial Politics of Recognition (University of Minnesota Press, 2014). Intertextual: Art in Dialogue is an ongoing reading group held across a range of visual art institutions in Vancouver that takes place between January and October 2016.

Dr. Coulthard is a member of the Yellowknives Dene First Nation and part of the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program and the Department of Political Science at UBC. He has written and published numerous articles and chapters in the areas of Indigenous thought and politics, contemporary political theory and radical social and political thought.

Tuesday, March 8, 1:00 – 2:00 PM
Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery, UBC

Daniel Heath Justice talk, “Being a Good Relative, Becoming a Good Ancestor: Other-than-Human Kinship and the Decolonial Imperative”

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Dr. Daniel Heath Justice

(First Nations Studies Program and English, University of British Columbia)

“Being a Good Relative, Becoming a Good Ancestor: Other-than-Human Kinship and the Decolonial Imperative”

5-6:30pm, Wed Nov 27, Coach House, Green College, UBC

Abstract: From the nineteenth-century decimation of prairie bison herds and imposition of patriarchal farming techniques to the contemporary decline of coastal fisheries and narrowed concerns of familial obligations, a consistent pattern in Eurowestern political and economic colonialism worldwide has been the targeted suppression of Indigenous kinship relations with the other-than-human. While variously dismissed by colonial agents as “pagan,” “primitive,” or illusory, such expansive familial relations are in fact substantive to and expressive of Indigenous political, ceremonial, and intellectual practices of self-determination and cultural and political distinctiveness. This presentation will consider a few illustrative examples of the other-than-human as a vital concern in Indigenous decolonization and resurgence politics today, while critically engaging the potential consequences of an absence of such considerations in contemporary activism and scholarship.

Speaker Info: Daniel Heath Justice is a Colorado-born Canadian citizen of the Cherokee Nation. He is Chair of the First Nations Studies Program and Associate Professor of First Nations Studies and English at UBC on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territories of the Musqueam people. His work includes Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History, the Indigenous epic fantasy The Way of Thorn and Thunder: The Kynship Chronicles, and the co-edited anthologies Sovereign Erotics: A Collection of Two-Spirit Literature and, with James H. Cox, the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature. Current projects include a cultural history of badgers and a study of critical kinship in Indigenous literature.

All those attending talks in this series are invited to stay for dinner at Green College with the speaker. Those interested in attending dinner are asked to make a reservation at least by noon the business day before. Contact 604-822-8660 or visit the Green College website for details.

Oecologies: Inhabiting Premodern Worlds is a new Speaker Series sponsored by Green College that gathers scholars from the humanities living and working along the North American Pacific coast to investigate the idea of “oecology,” an older spelling of the modern concept “ecology.” For event details, abstracts, and speaker information, please visit oecologies.com or view the event poster. Also follow us on Twitter (@Oecologies) and “Like” us on Facebook (facebook.com/oecologies)! Oecologies also holds a reading group in advance of each talk in the Speaker Series. If you are interested in attending, please contact Dr. Robert Rouse (robert.rouse@ubc.ca). If you have other questions about Oecologies, please do not hesitate to contact me (nardizzi@mail.ubc.ca) or our assistant, Carmel Ohman (carmelohman@gmail.com).