Indigenous Knowledge

Helpers needed – Elders & Knowledge Keepers program

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Indigenous Medicine

LEARNING OPPORTUNITY FOR INDIGENOUS STUDENTS

Vancouver Coastal Health’s Aboriginal Health Department has a pilot project opportunity! A select few will be given the opportunity to work alongside Indigenous Elders and Knowledge Keepers. Traditional teachings tell us our Elders & Knowledge Keepers must always have Helpers for safety and so that the knowledge can be passed onto the next generation. We are looking for Indigenous students who would like to be Helpers for our Elders & Knowledge Keepers program.

The Helpers group will start small and then grow as we assess and make adjustments. The pilot project’s initial roll out will contain four adults, eight youth and two Traditional Elders. The adults will commit to a minimum of sixteen hours a month while the youth will commit to a minimum of four hours per month [The hours do have some flexibility].

The work of the Elder & Knowledge Keepers (KK) is very diverse at Vancouver Coastal health as noted below:

  • Use traditional ways to support Indigenous patients with their families in health care settings;
  • Provide cultural support to Indigenous patients and their families in crisis or at times of passing;
  • Provide cultural teachings and guidance at health authority meetings (addictions, mental health, DTES, youth, seniors, maternity, health care education, etc.);
  • Lead and provide cultural support to small groups in health care settings, such as Indigenous youth at the HOpe, or Indigenous seniors in long-term hospital care;
  • Share Indigenous teachings at meetings, conferences and workshops;
  • Provide openings/closings/land acknowledgments for Vancouver Coastal Health conferences/gatherings/events.

Description: Indigenous Medicine – VCH – Student Opportunities

Please contact Shawna.duncan@vch.ca for more information.

 

 

Job – Adjunct Professor, Introduction to Creative Writing with an Indigenous Focus, UBC Vancouver. Due: Aug 15, 2017

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The Creative Writing Program at the University of British Columbia – Vancouver seeks to hire an Adjunct Professor to teach CRWR 220:  Introduction to Creative Writing with an Indigenous Focus.   The successful candidate will teach creative writing across three genres.  CRWR 220 is a 3-hour course (meets once for 3 hours OR twice weekly at 1.5 hours) with a maximum enrolment of 50 students.  This 3-credit course will be scheduled in 2017 Winter session, term 2 (January to April 2018).

 

Requirements:  An MFA degree is preferred, but a Bachelor’s degree combined with a strong record of creative writing credits will be considered as well.  Applicants must have demonstrated excellence in at least three of the following genres:  fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, radio drama, podcasting, stage play, screen and television, graphics, and storytelling.  Teaching experience at the postsecondary level in the workshop format and strong pedagogical and organizational skills are essential.

 

Applicants are asked to apply through our online application site at http://creativewriting.ubc.ca/program-information/opportunities/adjunct-instructor-indigenous-focus/ with a letter of application, current CV, and evidence of teaching ability and effectiveness (course outlines, student evaluations, etc.).

 

Applicants should also arrange for two confidential letters of recommendation to be sent under separate cover by email to: crwr.admin@ubc.ca.

Deadline for applications and recommendation letters: Tuesday August 15, 2017.

 

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Métis, Inuit, or Indigenous person. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

New Issue of Canadian Journal of Education

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Canadian Journal of Education

Canadian Journal of Education/Revue canadienne de l’éducation has just published its latest issue [Vol 39, No 4 (2016)] at http://www.cje-rce.ca/index.php/cje-rce. We invite you to review the Table of Contents on our site and review articles and items of interest.

Editorial/Éditorial

Editorial | December 2016 PDF
Christopher DeLuca, Theodore M. Christou 1-3

Articles

Les enseignants issus de la diversité ethnoculturelle représentent-ils une valeur ajoutée pour la profession ? Résultats d’une étude menée en Suisse romande PDF (Français)
Stéphanie Bauer, Abdeljalil Akkari 1-25
Documenter les façons de faire d’enseignants de 6e année du primaire en mathématiques, en lecture et en écriture dans toutes les étapes de la démarche d’évaluation PDF (Français)
Lakshmee Devi Ramoo, Micheline-Joanne Durand 1-24
Revisiting the Challenges Linked to Parenting and Home–School Relationships at the High School Level PDF
Rollande Deslandes, Sylvie Barma 1-32
Développer le sens du métier pour favoriser le bienêtre en formation initiale à l’enseignement PDF (Français)
Nancy Goyette 1-29
Enseigner en milieu francophone minoritaire canadien: synthèse des connaissances sur les défis et leurs implications pour la formation des enseignants PDF (Français)
Martine Cavanagh, Laurent Cammarata, Sylvie Blain 1-32
From Cultural Deprivation to Individual Deficits: A Genealogy of Deficiency in Inuit Adult Education PDF
Scott McLean 1-28
Inclusion Reconceptualized: Pre-Service Teacher Education and Disability Studies in Education PDF
Chris Gilham, Joanne Tompkins 1-25
Étude de conditions didactiques favorables à la décontextualisation des connaissances mathématiques PDF (Français)
Virginie Houle 1-19
Lire des textes de fiction et des textes informatifs aux élèves du préscolaire et du primaire : analyse des interactions extratextuelles des enseignants PDF (Français)
Anne-Marie Dionne 1-28
Evolving Practices: Admissions Policies in Ontario Teacher Education Programs PDF
Michael Holden, Julian Kitchen 1-28

Book Reviews/Recensions d’ouvrages

Indigenous Business in Canada: Principles and Practices PDF
Melanie Nelson, Matthew Waugh 1-4
Self-Construction and Social Transformation: Lifelong, Lifewide and Life-deep Learning PDF
Carl Ruest 1-4
GRIT: The Power of Passion and Perseverance PDF
Richard Morehouse

CFP – Rising Up: Indigenous Knowledge and Research in Indigenous Studies Graduate Student Conference, University of Manitoba. Due: Feb 3, 2017

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Rising Up: A Graduate Students Conference on Indigenous Knowledge and Research in Indigenous Studies is an international gathering held annually. Rising Up attracts scholars in all forms of Indigenous research with approximately 60 representatives from around the world to showcase their work.
The University of Manitoba Native Studies Graduate Students Association (NSGSA) is hosting the second annual two-day conference for all graduate students to lead the discussion across all disciplines and allow graduates to present their knowledge and research.
This year the Conference will take place between March 17th and 18th in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. Rising Up 2017 will focus on Indigenous Knowledge and Indigenous Research.
Submission of abstracts
The deadline for abstract submissions is currently February 3rd, 2017 and can be sent online via risingup@umanitoba.ca. Abstracts will be accepted online, reviewed and notification provided on a rolling basis. Abstracts should be 150- 200 words and include First name, last name, University program or department and personal email address.
NSGSA invites its network to share the call for abstracts and the information about the Conference to all of those interested in contributing to this year event.
What: Conference: Rising Up: A Graduate Student Conference on Indigenous Knowledge and Research in Indigenous Studies.
When: March 17-18, 2017
Where: University of Manitoba, Fort Garry Campus
This is a free event, open to all.
If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact me.
Top of Form
Pishshapmishko (Take Care)
Laura Forsythe, B.A., B Ed.
Masters Candidate
Native Studies Graduate Students Association 

University of Manitoba 

Course: Researching in Cross-Cultural and Global Contexts

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EDCP 508 (031): Researching in Cross-Cultural and Global Contexts open to all students

The focus of this advanced research methodology course is to guide students in the design and enactment of cross-cultural research with Indigenous and other marginalized peoples in local and global contexts. While mainstream research primarily privileges the generation of new knowledge, there is growing call for re-generation of the ‘ten thousand different voices’ that still exist on this planet to address global social and ecological injustices and other critical issues facing life on earth. These knowledges are based on millennia of observation and lived experiences that bring together human, non-human and more-than-human intelligences and agencies, gesturing toward radically reimagined and enacted research affiliations, relationships and responsibilities.   

 

This course offers students an opportunity to examine the challenges of conducting research across different worldviews, knowledge systems, languages, geographies, and ecologies. In this era of epistemic hegemony, neoliberalism, global capitalism and climate change, students will consider research method(ologie)s and research projects that promote equity, social and environmental justice, and living in a good way with all our relations. Students will critically reflect on their own philosophical, historical, cultural, epistemological, ontological, and relational life narratives and how they influence the methodological shaping of their own research projects. It is recommended that students come to this course having already completed EDUC 500: Introduction to Research Methodologies.

Winter Term 1, 2016   Day: Monday   Time: 4:40PM – 7:30PM

Professor: Dr. Peter Cole     peter.cole@ubc.ca

Call for papers, Duranbinjma-Burre: International Indigenous Knowledge Conference, Australia. Due: Sept 30, 2016

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THE WEARURUK RESEARCH CENTRE

INSTITUTE OF KOORIE EDUCATION DEAKIN UNIVERSITY AUSTRALIA CALL FOR PAPERS

Duranbinjma-Burre: International Indigenous Knowledge Conference Australia 26 – 28 June 2017

The interdisciplinary conference, Duranbinjma-Burre: International Indigenous Knowledge Conference Australia to be hosted by the Wearuruk Research Centre at the Institute of Koorie Education Deakin University will examine the impact of Indigenous Knowledge systems and approaches to research across the disciplines of the Humanities and Creative Arts, Education, Health, Law and Philosophy. It aims to extend debates on how Indigenous ontology and epistemology articulate modes of knowledge production that give rise to transforming discourses and have the capacity to solve real world problems.

Leading and emerging Scholars from Australia and overseas will extend the frontiers of this burgeoning paradigm of research through debates on how Indigenous knowledge systems have the potential to reframe western approaches to knowledge by articulating the implications, applications and benefits of indigenous research both within and beyond Indigenous communities and research arenas.

Duranbinjma-Burre denotes the idea of the growing up and nurturing of persons, ideas and entities. This notion is aligned with our aim of illuminating and advancing Indigenous Paradigms of knowledge production and transmission. The question of what new knowledge and understandings Indigenous approaches can reveal that may not be revealed by other modes of research underpins the objectives of this conference. Further questions outlined below and that provide a framework for articulating this are based on the work a group of postgraduate researchers from the Institute of Koorie Education, Deakin University Australia.

Keynote Speakers:

Reality

Distinguished Professor Hingangaroa Smith is an internationally renowned Māori educationalist who has been at the forefront of the alternative Māori initiatives in the education field and beyond. Professor Smith has made significant contributions to the political, social, economic and cultural advancement of Māori communities. He has also worked extensively with other indigenous/ First Nations peoples across the world, including Canada, Hawaii, US mainland, Taiwan, Chile, Australia and the Pacific nations.

Pausauraq Jana Harcharek has worked with the North Slope Borough School District (NSBSD) in the department of Iñupiaq Education for over fifteen years. During this time she facilitated a number of long-term projects including the Iñupiaq Education Initiative that resulted in the development of the Iñupiaq Learning Framework (ILF). Jana has been a critical force in promoting and maintaining the Iñupiaq culture, language and way of life in education.

Professor Norm Sheehan is a Wiradjuri man born in Mudgee NSW. In 2013 Professor Sheehan commenced as Director of Gnibi College of Indigenous Australian Peoples Southern Cross University. Norm’s current Respectful Design research seeks to outline and employ culturally recognisable and affirming methods to activate cultural growth and redirection within communities.

• What is reality? How is it seen and how do meanings emerge from Australian Indigenous Knowledge systems? Art and Symbols

  • What is the importance of symbols, story-telling and art in Indigenous research?
  • How are natural, symbolic, material, spiritual and ceremonial entities related in Indigenous Knowledge systems?
  • How is time viewed in Indigenous Epistemology and ontology?

    Experience

  • In what ways does the researcher’s lived experience influence and validate knowledge emerging from research
  • How does the researcher’s experience operate in relation to the experience of others? Positioning
  • How are men and women positioned in relation to Land and Country?
  • Who is seen and heard in Indigenous research?
  • How do visible/invisible and outsider/insider relations operate
  • Who benefits from the research? Who controls the research and the emergent knowledge?

    Abstracts of 250 words are invited for single authored or co- authored 20–minute presentations that address (though not exclusively nor comprehensively) the above questions for consideration through double blind refereeing. Please also include the title of your paper, a 150- word biography, institutional affiliation and full contact details with your submission
    Presenters will later be invited to submit full papers to be refereed for publication in full conference proceedings.

Please send abstracts by 30 September 2016: Ms Julie Nichols Email: j.nichols@deakin.edu.au

 

 

 

 

Call for Participants – Paths to Sustainability: Creating Connection through Place-based Indigenous Knowledge

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Call for Participants

Paths to Sustainability: Creating Connection through Place-based Indigenous Knowledge

Seeking people to participate in a Vancouver-area research project on Indigenous world view, Place-based education and the practice of sustainability. This is for a research study conducted by Celia Brauer, a Graduate Student in Socio-cultural Anthropology at the University of British Columbia.

Participants must be available: Aug 2016 – Nov 2016 for 5, 5 hour Sessions, on weekend afternoons.

Plus: pre-and post-interview sessions of about 2 hours.

Participants must be 19 years or over and able-bodied. They should be interested in the subject matter and follow the whole course of educational sessions, plus all the interviews: approx. 25 hours total.

Contact Information: Co-Investigator: Celia Brauer: celiabrauer@alumni.ubc.ca

 

Musqueam Post dedicated at UBC Vancouver campus

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Mainphoto770

Musqueam artist Brent Sparrow Jr. carved the new Musqueam Post during UBC’s Centennial year. Photo credit: Reese Muntean

The Musqueam people and the University of British Columbia acknowledged their developing partnership today with the dedication of a striking cedar post installed prominently on the Point Grey campus, which is located on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Musqueam people.

Carved by talented Musqueam artist, Brent Sparrow Jr., the post tells an origin story of the Musqueam involving a two-headed serpent.

“We cherish the relationship between the university and the Musqueam,” said Musqueam Chief Wayne Sparrow. “As UBC is on our traditional territory, it’s important that we work together closely to share our culture and look for opportunities to work together.”

The new Musqueam post is now installed, facing east towards the new Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre and the campus entrance, at the foot of a cascading water feature at University Boulevard and East Mall.

“This beautiful post will serve as a permanent welcome to all visitors to these grounds and as a reminder of our relationship with the Musqueam people who were here long before UBC’s history began,” said Interim President Martha Piper. “Its dedication, one of the closing events of UBC’s Centennial year, points towards renewed—and stronger—relationships in the future.”

The land upon which UBC and the post are situated has always been a place of learning for the Musqueam people, where culture, history, and traditions have been passed from one generation to the next.

A time-lapse video of the installation of the Musqueam post can be viewed here: https://youtu.be/1ii_DjN1kz8

A photo gallery of the creation of the Musqueam post can be viewed here: http://100.ubc.ca/galleries/musqueam-post/

For more on the post and the history of the Musqueam-UBC relationship, see http://centennial.aboriginal.ubc.ca

For more about partnership between the Musqueam and UBC, including academic courses and youth programs, visit: http://aboriginal.ubc.ca/community-youth/musqueam-and-ubc/

Brent Sparrow Jr. speaks about the Musqueam Post:

“This qeqən (post) tells the story of the origin of our name xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam). The old people spoke of a small lake called xʷməm̓qʷe:m (Camosun Bog) where the sʔi:ɬqəy̓ (double-headed serpent) originated. They were warned as youth to be cautious and not go near or they would surely die. This sʔi:ɬqəy̓ was so massive its winding path from the lake to the stal̕əw̓ (river) became the creek flowing through Musqueam to this day. Everything the serpent passed over died and from its droppings bloomed a new plant, the məθkʷəy̓. For this reason the people of long ago named that place xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam – place of the məθkʷəy̓)

This qeqən represents our xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) ancestors and our ongoing connection to them and this land through their teachings. The figure is holding the sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s tail to showcase this sχʷəy̓em̓’s (ancient history) passage through generations, relating how we became known as xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) people – People of the məθkʷəy̓ plant. The scalloping reflects the sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s path and trigons represent the unique məθkʷəy̓ plant. The sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s stomach is said to have been as big as a storage basket, designed here as an oval. I drew upon these traditional design elements to depict this rich history.”

Significant Musqueam-UBC milestones

1927: A pair of Musqueam house posts are presented to UBC: http://100.ubc.ca/timeline/musqueam-house-posts-are-presented-to-ubc/

1993: The First Nations Longhouse, built in consultation with Musqueam and many other Aboriginal groups, opens as a gathering place for Aboriginal students and a place of learning for people from the broader community.

2006: The University of British Columbia and the Musqueam Indian Band sign a historic memorandum of affiliation to further the sharing of knowledge and the advancement of Musqueam and Aboriginal youth and adults in post-secondary education.

Assistant or Associate Professor in Indigenous Literatures, Department of English. Due: Mar 31, 2016

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Assistant or Associate Professor in Indigenous Literatures, Department of English, Faculty of Arts
Job ID: 9966

Updated: February 23, 2016

Location: Main Campus

Position Description

The Faculty of Arts, Department of English, invites applications at the rank of Assistant Professor (tenure-track) or Associate Professor (with tenure) in the area of Indigenous Literatures.  The anticipated start date is July 1, 2016.

We are seeking candidates who will establish and maintain an active research program with the ability to secure external research funding; produce high impact research and scholarship in their area of specialization; teach graduate and undergraduate courses, and supervise graduate and undergraduate students; and engage in meaningful service activities within the department, faculty, university and community.

As a faculty member in the Department of English, the successful applicant will have a PhD in English or Indigenous-related literary studies and a demonstrated ability to conduct research and develop partnerships with local communities. Candidates will have interdisciplinary strength in Indigenous Studies and the ability to direct the Faculty of Arts’ International Indigenous Studies program (http://www.ucalgary.ca/indg/).

Applicants at the Assistant Professor level are expected to provide evidence of, or potential for, excellence in both research and teaching through peer-reviewed publications in leading journals and academic presses, and have a track record of successful grant applications, course development and teaching effectiveness, as well as community-engaged scholarship with Indigenous peoples.

Applicants at the Associate Professor rank must demonstrate excellence in research, teaching and community engagement through publications in leading journals and academic presses, proven success in obtaining competitive research funding, evidence of teaching effectiveness and instructional development, as well as successfully concluded projects with Indigenous peoples. The successful candidate will be able to assume a leadership role at the beginning of the appointment.

The Department of English is a research-intensive department with high standards in teaching. It values interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches to research and training, and strongly encourages collaboration. The department has thriving MA and PhD programs, and recognized strengths in historical literary periods, archival and book history, postcolonial literature, creative writing, new media and digital humanities, among other areas. For more information about the Department of English, please visit https://english.ucalgary.ca/. With 56 undergraduate programs and over 7,100 students, the Faculty of Arts is the largest and most diverse faculty at the University of Calgary. For information on the Faculty of Arts, please visit https://arts.ucalgary.ca/about. For information on programs and departments in the Faculty of Arts, please visit https://arts.ucalgary.ca/programs.

In their letter to the committee, applicants should address current and future research directions including community engagement. They should also send a current curriculum vitae, one refereed publication, and evidence of teaching excellence such as a statement of teaching philosophy, recent teaching evaluations, examples of course development; and should arrange to have three confidential letters of reference forwarded directly to:

Dr. Jacqueline Jenkins
Head of English
Faculty of Arts
University of Calgary
2500 University Drive NW
Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4

or by email to Barb Howe, at howe@ucalgary.ca

All applications must be received by March 31, 2016.

The University of Calgary believes that a respectful workplace, equal opportunity and building a diverse workforce contribute to the richness of the environment for teaching, learning and research, and provide faculty, staff, students and the public with a university that reflects the society it serves. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. In this connection, at the time of your application, please answer the following question: Are you a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada? (Yes/No)

Additional Information

To view a listing of all available academic opportunities and to find out more about what the University of Calgary has to offer, please visit our Academic Careers website.

About the University of Calgary

The University of Calgary is Canada’s leading next-generation university – a living, growing and youthful institution that embraces change and opportunity with a can-do attitude. Located in the nation’s most enterprising city, the university is making tremendous progress on its Eyes High journey to become one of Canada’s top five research universities, grounded in innovative learning and teaching and fully integrated with the community it both serves and leads. Ranked as the top young university in Canada and North America, the University of Calgary inspires and supports discovery, creativity and innovation across all disciplines. For more information, visit ucalgary.ca.

About Calgary, Alberta

Ranked the 5th most livable city in the world, Calgary is one of the world’s cleanest cities and one of the best cities in Canada to raise a family. Calgary is a city of leaders – in business, community, philanthropy and volunteerism. Calgarians benefit from a growing number of world-class dining and cultural events and enjoy more days of sunshine per year than any other major Canadian city. Calgary is less than an hour’s drive from the majestic Rocky Mountains and boasts the most extensive urban pathway and bikeway network in North America.

 

Apply Online: http://careers.ucalgary.ca/jobs/5055528-assistant-or-associate-professor-in-indigenous-literatures-department-of-english-faculty-of-arts