Indigenous Knowledge

Call for Participants – Paths to Sustainability: Creating Connection through Place-based Indigenous Knowledge

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Call for Participants

Paths to Sustainability: Creating Connection through Place-based Indigenous Knowledge

Seeking people to participate in a Vancouver-area research project on Indigenous world view, Place-based education and the practice of sustainability. This is for a research study conducted by Celia Brauer, a Graduate Student in Socio-cultural Anthropology at the University of British Columbia.

Participants must be available: Aug 2016 – Nov 2016 for 5, 5 hour Sessions, on weekend afternoons.

Plus: pre-and post-interview sessions of about 2 hours.

Participants must be 19 years or over and able-bodied. They should be interested in the subject matter and follow the whole course of educational sessions, plus all the interviews: approx. 25 hours total.

Contact Information: Co-Investigator: Celia Brauer: celiabrauer@alumni.ubc.ca

 

Musqueam Post dedicated at UBC Vancouver campus

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Musqueam artist Brent Sparrow Jr. carved the new Musqueam Post during UBC’s Centennial year. Photo credit: Reese Muntean

The Musqueam people and the University of British Columbia acknowledged their developing partnership today with the dedication of a striking cedar post installed prominently on the Point Grey campus, which is located on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Musqueam people.

Carved by talented Musqueam artist, Brent Sparrow Jr., the post tells an origin story of the Musqueam involving a two-headed serpent.

“We cherish the relationship between the university and the Musqueam,” said Musqueam Chief Wayne Sparrow. “As UBC is on our traditional territory, it’s important that we work together closely to share our culture and look for opportunities to work together.”

The new Musqueam post is now installed, facing east towards the new Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre and the campus entrance, at the foot of a cascading water feature at University Boulevard and East Mall.

“This beautiful post will serve as a permanent welcome to all visitors to these grounds and as a reminder of our relationship with the Musqueam people who were here long before UBC’s history began,” said Interim President Martha Piper. “Its dedication, one of the closing events of UBC’s Centennial year, points towards renewed—and stronger—relationships in the future.”

The land upon which UBC and the post are situated has always been a place of learning for the Musqueam people, where culture, history, and traditions have been passed from one generation to the next.

A time-lapse video of the installation of the Musqueam post can be viewed here: https://youtu.be/1ii_DjN1kz8

A photo gallery of the creation of the Musqueam post can be viewed here: http://100.ubc.ca/galleries/musqueam-post/

For more on the post and the history of the Musqueam-UBC relationship, see http://centennial.aboriginal.ubc.ca

For more about partnership between the Musqueam and UBC, including academic courses and youth programs, visit: http://aboriginal.ubc.ca/community-youth/musqueam-and-ubc/

Brent Sparrow Jr. speaks about the Musqueam Post:

“This qeqən (post) tells the story of the origin of our name xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam). The old people spoke of a small lake called xʷməm̓qʷe:m (Camosun Bog) where the sʔi:ɬqəy̓ (double-headed serpent) originated. They were warned as youth to be cautious and not go near or they would surely die. This sʔi:ɬqəy̓ was so massive its winding path from the lake to the stal̕əw̓ (river) became the creek flowing through Musqueam to this day. Everything the serpent passed over died and from its droppings bloomed a new plant, the məθkʷəy̓. For this reason the people of long ago named that place xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam – place of the məθkʷəy̓)

This qeqən represents our xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) ancestors and our ongoing connection to them and this land through their teachings. The figure is holding the sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s tail to showcase this sχʷəy̓em̓’s (ancient history) passage through generations, relating how we became known as xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) people – People of the məθkʷəy̓ plant. The scalloping reflects the sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s path and trigons represent the unique məθkʷəy̓ plant. The sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s stomach is said to have been as big as a storage basket, designed here as an oval. I drew upon these traditional design elements to depict this rich history.”

Significant Musqueam-UBC milestones

1927: A pair of Musqueam house posts are presented to UBC: http://100.ubc.ca/timeline/musqueam-house-posts-are-presented-to-ubc/

1993: The First Nations Longhouse, built in consultation with Musqueam and many other Aboriginal groups, opens as a gathering place for Aboriginal students and a place of learning for people from the broader community.

2006: The University of British Columbia and the Musqueam Indian Band sign a historic memorandum of affiliation to further the sharing of knowledge and the advancement of Musqueam and Aboriginal youth and adults in post-secondary education.

Assistant or Associate Professor in Indigenous Literatures, Department of English. Due: Mar 31, 2016

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Assistant or Associate Professor in Indigenous Literatures, Department of English, Faculty of Arts
Job ID: 9966

Updated: February 23, 2016

Location: Main Campus

Position Description

The Faculty of Arts, Department of English, invites applications at the rank of Assistant Professor (tenure-track) or Associate Professor (with tenure) in the area of Indigenous Literatures.  The anticipated start date is July 1, 2016.

We are seeking candidates who will establish and maintain an active research program with the ability to secure external research funding; produce high impact research and scholarship in their area of specialization; teach graduate and undergraduate courses, and supervise graduate and undergraduate students; and engage in meaningful service activities within the department, faculty, university and community.

As a faculty member in the Department of English, the successful applicant will have a PhD in English or Indigenous-related literary studies and a demonstrated ability to conduct research and develop partnerships with local communities. Candidates will have interdisciplinary strength in Indigenous Studies and the ability to direct the Faculty of Arts’ International Indigenous Studies program (http://www.ucalgary.ca/indg/).

Applicants at the Assistant Professor level are expected to provide evidence of, or potential for, excellence in both research and teaching through peer-reviewed publications in leading journals and academic presses, and have a track record of successful grant applications, course development and teaching effectiveness, as well as community-engaged scholarship with Indigenous peoples.

Applicants at the Associate Professor rank must demonstrate excellence in research, teaching and community engagement through publications in leading journals and academic presses, proven success in obtaining competitive research funding, evidence of teaching effectiveness and instructional development, as well as successfully concluded projects with Indigenous peoples. The successful candidate will be able to assume a leadership role at the beginning of the appointment.

The Department of English is a research-intensive department with high standards in teaching. It values interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches to research and training, and strongly encourages collaboration. The department has thriving MA and PhD programs, and recognized strengths in historical literary periods, archival and book history, postcolonial literature, creative writing, new media and digital humanities, among other areas. For more information about the Department of English, please visit https://english.ucalgary.ca/. With 56 undergraduate programs and over 7,100 students, the Faculty of Arts is the largest and most diverse faculty at the University of Calgary. For information on the Faculty of Arts, please visit https://arts.ucalgary.ca/about. For information on programs and departments in the Faculty of Arts, please visit https://arts.ucalgary.ca/programs.

In their letter to the committee, applicants should address current and future research directions including community engagement. They should also send a current curriculum vitae, one refereed publication, and evidence of teaching excellence such as a statement of teaching philosophy, recent teaching evaluations, examples of course development; and should arrange to have three confidential letters of reference forwarded directly to:

Dr. Jacqueline Jenkins
Head of English
Faculty of Arts
University of Calgary
2500 University Drive NW
Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4

or by email to Barb Howe, at howe@ucalgary.ca

All applications must be received by March 31, 2016.

The University of Calgary believes that a respectful workplace, equal opportunity and building a diverse workforce contribute to the richness of the environment for teaching, learning and research, and provide faculty, staff, students and the public with a university that reflects the society it serves. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. In this connection, at the time of your application, please answer the following question: Are you a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada? (Yes/No)

Additional Information

To view a listing of all available academic opportunities and to find out more about what the University of Calgary has to offer, please visit our Academic Careers website.

About the University of Calgary

The University of Calgary is Canada’s leading next-generation university – a living, growing and youthful institution that embraces change and opportunity with a can-do attitude. Located in the nation’s most enterprising city, the university is making tremendous progress on its Eyes High journey to become one of Canada’s top five research universities, grounded in innovative learning and teaching and fully integrated with the community it both serves and leads. Ranked as the top young university in Canada and North America, the University of Calgary inspires and supports discovery, creativity and innovation across all disciplines. For more information, visit ucalgary.ca.

About Calgary, Alberta

Ranked the 5th most livable city in the world, Calgary is one of the world’s cleanest cities and one of the best cities in Canada to raise a family. Calgary is a city of leaders – in business, community, philanthropy and volunteerism. Calgarians benefit from a growing number of world-class dining and cultural events and enjoy more days of sunshine per year than any other major Canadian city. Calgary is less than an hour’s drive from the majestic Rocky Mountains and boasts the most extensive urban pathway and bikeway network in North America.

 

Apply Online: http://careers.ucalgary.ca/jobs/5055528-assistant-or-associate-professor-in-indigenous-literatures-department-of-english-faculty-of-arts

A Conversation with Dr. Kim TallBear: An Indigenous Ethic of Relationality

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Kim TallBear’s forthcoming book, Disrupting Settlement, Sex and Nature: An Indigenous Logic, offers an alternative framework to such settlements and binaries—that of purposeful, responsible migration and boundary crossing (which can also be viewed as a form of critical and mindful promiscuity), or routedness through place, knowledge/disciplines, and intimate relations with both humans and landscapes. The concept of relations—rather than nature or sex—is central. This ethic of relationality will be the central point of this conversation.

Tuesday, February 23, 4 – 5:30 PM
Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall, Longhouse

RSVP via email to fnis.arts@ubc.ca by 4 PM, February 19. Indicate any food allergies in your RSVP.

Source: The Talking Stick: News and Information from the First Nations Longhouse, February 15, 2016

New Issue in Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society

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Dear friends,

Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society has just published its
latest issue at http://decolonization.org/index.php/des/issue/view/1618.

We invite you to review the Table of Contents here and then visit our web
site to review and read articles and items of interest.

We’re thrilled to continue to publish as an open access journal and
appreciate your ongoing support in sharing this work as widely as possible
through your networks!

In peace,

Eric Ritskes
Editor

Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society
Vol 4, No 2 (2015)
Table of Contents
http://decolonization.org/index.php/des/issue/view/1618

Cover Art
——–

Artist’s statement: What decolonization means to me
Kalkidan Assefa

Articles
——–

Indigenous girls and the violence of settler colonial policing
Jaskiran K. Dhillon
Refusal to forgive: Indigenous women’s love and rage
Rachel Flowers
Teaching Indigenous methodology and an Iñupiaq example
Maureen P. Hogan,       Sean A. Topkok
Beyond the colonial divide: African diasporic and Indigenous youth alliance
building for HIV prevention
Ciann L. Wilson,        Sarah Flicker,  Jean-Paul Restoule
Tensional decolonization and public order in Western Nigeria, 1957-1960
Oluwatoyin Oduntan,     Kemi Rotimi
Reviews
——–

A review of Indigenous Statistics: A Quantitative Research Methodology
Elaine Coburn
Indigenous temporal priority and the (de)legitimization of the Canadian
state: A book review of On Being Here to Stay
Scott Kouri

________________________________________________________________________
Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society
www.decolonization.org

Indigenous Knowledge Gathering – Tucson, March 17, 2016 at 8 am – 5 pm

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THE GLOBAL JUSTICE CENTER, 225 EAST 26TH STREET, TUCSON, ARIZONA, 85713

La Alianza Indigena Sin Fronteras/Indigenous Alliance Without Borders is proposing to host an Indigenous Knowledge Gathering in Tucson March 17, at the Global Justice Center.

The gathering is a semilla and extension of collaboration and solidarity with the first Indigenous Knowledge Gathering in San Francisco this past May 2015.

The Indigenous Knowledge Gathering Tuscon is strategically prior to The National Association of Ethnic Studies ((http://ethnicstudies.org/), and the National MEChA Conference (https://www.facebook.com/groups/2204493345/) with activities extending from March 17 to the 20th.

The Indigenous Knowledge Gathering agenda is a community effort and in development. Please stay posted for updates and announcements. If you are interested in becoming involved, please feel free to reach out at mictlanxochitl@gmail.com. The working goals of the gathering include:

1) Collecting testimonies, observations, and critical analysis of indigenous scholarship and cultural movements.

2) To gather and build a community of indigenous communities, indigenous scholars, and indigenous scholar practitioners representing indigenous groups, cultures, and traditions.

3) To build inquiry, strategy, and methods to disrupt scholarship and education models that subjugates and prejudice indigenous populations, history, culture, and traditions.

It is not accidental that all of these conferences will all be held in Arizona, as the state has been akin to the Deep South for some time, a laboratory of hate, but also of resistance. When you get here, remember that you are arriving to what some call the borderlands. Actually, you will be arriving to Indian Country.

This a FREE EVENT and open to all communities.

Host Committee Members to date:
Jose Matus, Director, Alianza Indigena Sin Fronteras
Tupak Enrique and Evie Reyes-Aguirre, Tonatierra-Nahuacalli (Phoenix)
Shannon Rivers, O’otham nation.
Maria Molina and Jesus Ruiz, Calpolli Teoxicalli (Tucson)
Roberto Cintli Rodriguez, University of Arizona
Angela Mictlanoxchitl Anderson Guerrero, California Institute of Integral Studies (San Francisco, CA)

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/1171429946205691/

Job – Assistant Professor (tenure track), Indigenous Studies, University of Sudbury. Dec. 1, 2015

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Assistant Professor in the Department of Indigenous Studies

The University of Sudbury, a bilingual and tri-cultural institution and founding member of the Laurentian Federation, invites applications for a tenure-stream position at the rank of Assistant Professor in the Department of Indigenous Studies commencing July 1, 2016. The Department of Indigenous Studies seeks a dynamic candidate with an expertise in the areas of: health and wellness, community-based research, Indigenous knowledge and Indigenous spirituality. Applicants should have a PhD, or ABD in Indigenous Studies or related discipline and have a demonstrated ability for excellence in research, teaching, publications and working with Indigenous communities. Experience in teaching and Indigenous research and knowledge of an Indigenous language and/or French will be considered definite assets.

Applications should include a cover letter, curriculum vitae, teaching dossier and three separate confidential reference letters directed to: Dr. Pierre Zundel, President and Vice-Chancellor, University of Sudbury, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario, P3E 2C6. The deadline for applications is December 1, 2015 but applications will be accepted until the position is filled.

This announcement is directed primarily but not exclusively to Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada. The University of Sudbury encourages applications from all qualified individuals, including women, members of visible and ethnic minorities, Indigenous peoples, and persons with disabilities.