Indigenous languages

Musqueam Post dedicated at UBC Vancouver campus

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Musqueam artist Brent Sparrow Jr. carved the new Musqueam Post during UBC’s Centennial year. Photo credit: Reese Muntean

The Musqueam people and the University of British Columbia acknowledged their developing partnership today with the dedication of a striking cedar post installed prominently on the Point Grey campus, which is located on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Musqueam people.

Carved by talented Musqueam artist, Brent Sparrow Jr., the post tells an origin story of the Musqueam involving a two-headed serpent.

“We cherish the relationship between the university and the Musqueam,” said Musqueam Chief Wayne Sparrow. “As UBC is on our traditional territory, it’s important that we work together closely to share our culture and look for opportunities to work together.”

The new Musqueam post is now installed, facing east towards the new Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre and the campus entrance, at the foot of a cascading water feature at University Boulevard and East Mall.

“This beautiful post will serve as a permanent welcome to all visitors to these grounds and as a reminder of our relationship with the Musqueam people who were here long before UBC’s history began,” said Interim President Martha Piper. “Its dedication, one of the closing events of UBC’s Centennial year, points towards renewed—and stronger—relationships in the future.”

The land upon which UBC and the post are situated has always been a place of learning for the Musqueam people, where culture, history, and traditions have been passed from one generation to the next.

A time-lapse video of the installation of the Musqueam post can be viewed here: https://youtu.be/1ii_DjN1kz8

A photo gallery of the creation of the Musqueam post can be viewed here: http://100.ubc.ca/galleries/musqueam-post/

For more on the post and the history of the Musqueam-UBC relationship, see http://centennial.aboriginal.ubc.ca

For more about partnership between the Musqueam and UBC, including academic courses and youth programs, visit: http://aboriginal.ubc.ca/community-youth/musqueam-and-ubc/

Brent Sparrow Jr. speaks about the Musqueam Post:

“This qeqən (post) tells the story of the origin of our name xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam). The old people spoke of a small lake called xʷməm̓qʷe:m (Camosun Bog) where the sʔi:ɬqəy̓ (double-headed serpent) originated. They were warned as youth to be cautious and not go near or they would surely die. This sʔi:ɬqəy̓ was so massive its winding path from the lake to the stal̕əw̓ (river) became the creek flowing through Musqueam to this day. Everything the serpent passed over died and from its droppings bloomed a new plant, the məθkʷəy̓. For this reason the people of long ago named that place xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam – place of the məθkʷəy̓)

This qeqən represents our xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) ancestors and our ongoing connection to them and this land through their teachings. The figure is holding the sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s tail to showcase this sχʷəy̓em̓’s (ancient history) passage through generations, relating how we became known as xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) people – People of the məθkʷəy̓ plant. The scalloping reflects the sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s path and trigons represent the unique məθkʷəy̓ plant. The sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s stomach is said to have been as big as a storage basket, designed here as an oval. I drew upon these traditional design elements to depict this rich history.”

Significant Musqueam-UBC milestones

1927: A pair of Musqueam house posts are presented to UBC: http://100.ubc.ca/timeline/musqueam-house-posts-are-presented-to-ubc/

1993: The First Nations Longhouse, built in consultation with Musqueam and many other Aboriginal groups, opens as a gathering place for Aboriginal students and a place of learning for people from the broader community.

2006: The University of British Columbia and the Musqueam Indian Band sign a historic memorandum of affiliation to further the sharing of knowledge and the advancement of Musqueam and Aboriginal youth and adults in post-secondary education.

CORRECTION: Stabilizing Indigenous Languages Symposium (SILS) in Billings, Montana, June 16-18, 2016

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The 23rd Stabilizing Indigenous Languages Symposium (SILS) will be held in Billings, Montana on June 6 & 7, 2016.

The conference web site is at http://sils2016.com/ and on-line registration is available.

 

Job – Asst. Professor, U of Lethbridge. Due: March 25, 2016

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Job Title Assistant Professor – Native American Studies
Rank Assistant Professor
Tenure Information Tenure Track
Position Details The Department of Native American Studies at the University of Lethbridge invites applications for one tenure track position at the rank of Assistant Professor, beginning July 1, 2016, subject to budgetary approval.

A Ph.D. (or near completion) is required, combined with a strong teaching, research, and publication record in Native American Studies. The area of research is open, with interest in candidates with multidisciplinary backgrounds in Indigenous or traditional knowledge and symbolism; Indigenous pedagogical and ontological perspectives; Aboriginal law, rights, and treaties; First Nations governance; economics; political science; history; or community development. Since Native American Studies faculty are required to teach in a wide variety of areas, candidates with experience and expertise in any one or any combination of the above listed areas will be given preference. Fluency in or knowledge of an Indigenous language is an asset.

The University of Lethbridge hires on the basis of merit and is committed to employment equity and diversity. All qualified persons are encouraged to apply. In accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given preference. Preference will also be given to Aboriginal applicants who meet the requirements of the position: applicants who wish to be considered under this initiative should self-identify in their cover letter. The University aspires to hire individuals who have demonstrated considerable potential for excellence in teaching, research and scholarship, and especially those who have well established research programs.

Located in southern Alberta, near the Rocky Mountains, Lethbridge offers a sunny, dry climate that is surprisingly mild for the prairies, excellent cultural and recreational amenities and attractive economic conditions. Founded in 1967, the University has an enrollment of over 8,000 students. Our focus on liberal education, selected professional programs, smaller classes, co-op placements, and involvement of students in faculty research provides the very best education available. For more information about Native American Studies and the University of Lethbridge please visit our web site at http://www.uleth.ca.

Faculty Faculty of Arts & Science
Campus Lethbridge

Posting Detail Information

Open Date 02/23/2016
Close Date 03/25/2016
Open Until Filled Yes
Special Instructions to Applicants Applications should include a curriculum vitae, transcripts, outlines of courses previously taught, teaching evaluations, publication reprints or preprints, a statement of teaching philosophy, a statement of research interests, and at least three references from scholars in the field. Send these materials, and arrange for the reference letters to be sent directly, electronically to Jessica.goodrider@uleth.ca. Enquiries may be directed to Dr. Muriel Mellow, Acting Chair, Department of Native American Studies, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4.; Telephone: (403) 329-2529, Fax: 403 380-1855, E-mail: muriel.mellow@uleth.ca
Employment Equity The University of Lethbridge hires on the basis of merit and is committed to employment equity and diversity. All qualified persons are encouraged to apply. In accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given preference.

Resource – Mi’kmaq manuscript online

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The Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library is pleased to announce that we have acquired and digitized a rare 19th century Mi’kmaq (Micmac) liturgical manuscript. The prayers are written chiefly in hieroglyphic script, with a few lines including interlinear transliteration in Latin script. Full resolution JPEG images of this extraordinary document are available from Beinecke’s digital library. Images are openly and freely accessible:
A record for this manuscript can be found in Yale’s online library catalog, Orbis:
We are excited to offer this new resource for the study of Mi’kmaq language and culture.
___________________________________
Lisa Conathan
Head of Digital Services Unit
Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
P.O. Box 208330
New Haven, CT 06520-8240
203.432.9039

Six Nations Polytechnic now offers indigenous language degree

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Six Nations Polytechnic now offers indigenous language degree
Students to be able to get a degree in Ogwehoweh (Cayuga and Mohawk) languages, not just diploma
CBC News Posted: Feb 08, 2016 3:46 PM ET Last Updated: Feb 08, 2016 3:46 PM ET

Ontario’s Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities announced that Six Nations Polytechnic Aboriginal Institute will be able to grant a degree, not just a diploma, in Ogwehoweh languages.

Students will now be able to receive a Bachelor of Arts degree, not just a diploma, in Ogwehoweh languages from the Six Nations Polytechnic Aboriginal Institute in Ohsweken, the province announced today.

It’s the first time the province has allowed an Aboriginal Institute, which are run and governed completely by indigenous leaders, to offer a degree program.

The news lines up with a recommendation from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission — that post-secondary institutions create degree programs in indigenous languages.

Reza Moridi, the province’s Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities, says the change allows several things to happen:

Helps promote and protect Ogwehoweh (Cayuga and Mohawk) languages.
Makes it possible for students to complete their degree at one institution, closer to home.
Helps students build on language and cultural knowledge and skills.
Expands student opportunities for jobs.
“Language preservation and protection are at the core values of Six Nations Polytechnic,” said Rebecca Jamieson, the school’s president, in a press release.

The current diploma program has been offered in partnership with McMaster University.

In the below photo, Six Nations Polytechnic president Rebecca Jamieson is holding a small replica of a drum. Ministers Reza Moridi and David Zimmer are holding a replica of the Covenant Chain wampum belt given by the school to “commemorate the friendships created,” according to Chelsey Johnson, communications director for the school.

Rick Hill, in the middle, is a senior coordinator at the Deyohaha:ge Indigenous Knowledge Centre, and he was holding a replica of the Two Row wampum belt.