Indigenous People

Graduate Research Assistant Project: Research in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Due: Aug 5, 2016

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The UBC Learning Exchange (http://learningexchange.ubc.ca) is seeking a Graduate Research Assistant (GRA) at Master’s or PhD level for one year to provide research support to the Academic Director. 

The Learning Exchange is core to UBC’s Downtown Eastside (DTES) campus and works to engage, inspire and lead local residents, students, faculty and organizations to work and learn together.  This GRA position will focus on issues of research in the DTES.  The project provides an excellent opportunity for a graduate student to develop expertise in community-based participatory research and knowledge exchange involving people who are marginalized and live in an area that has been stigmatized. The graduate student will be responsible for supporting all aspects of the Making Research Accessible initiative.

Hours: 15hrs/week    Pay: $1250 – $1350 per month.     Starting beginning of September

Deadline: Friday, August 5, 2016

Apply: Submit letter of interest and résumé to Dr. Angela Towle, Academic Director (angela.towle@ubc.ca)

Further information: http://learningexchange.ubc.ca/2016/07/19/were-hiring-graduate-research-assistant/

Changing Perceptions and Making Connections—One Map at a Time

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Aaron Carapella Son Sequoyah
Courtesy Brian McDermott
“Map guy” Aaron Carapella is pictured here with his son, Sequoyah.

Changing Perceptions and Making Connections—One Map at a Time

4/10/15

In the beginning, there were no lines.

Prior to 1492, North America was a vast wilderness: an expanse of rolling hills, open plains and meandering rivers. There were no state boundaries, no borders between countries and no private property.

That’s what Aaron Carapella captures in his Tribal Nations Maps, the only known maps that show what Turtle Island looked like before European contact.

“There are a lot of horrible maps out there that stereotype Native Americans or provide misinformation,” said Carapella, who lives in Stigler, Oklahoma. “We need something to combat that. We need maps that aren’t divided by modern countries and political borders, that show where tribes were and what they were called.”

The original Tribal Nations Map, released in 2012, is a poster-sized replica of the United States, minus the state lines. Roughly 590 Native nations are spread across the map, identified by their indigenous names, traditional locations and, when possible, historic images.

Aaron Carapella’s maps show original locations of indigenous people throughout North America, along with tribes’ traditional names. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
Aaron Carapella’s maps show original locations of indigenous people throughout North America, along with tribes’ traditional names. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

Carapella, who is of Cherokee descent, spent 14 years researching and creating his first map. But the project began years earlier when Carapella, now 35, was a teenager exploring his own heritage and looking for a map of tribes that he could hang on his bedroom wall.

“I never really found any good maps that were comprehensive in any way,” he said. “So I thought, why don’t I make my own? I bought four poster boards, taped them together and put on all the tribes that I knew.”

The first draft of Aaron Carapella’s Tribal Nations map was completed by hand, on pieces of poster board he taped together. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
The first draft of Aaron Carapella’s Tribal Nations map was completed by hand, on pieces of poster board he taped together. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

Carapella got serious about his project when he realized so many Native people had never seen themselves represented on a map. He traveled to 250 Native communities and contacted every cultural department in North America, he said.

“I’ve used books, military records, settler documentation and autobiographies,” he said. “On road trips, I get off the highway and visit tribal communities. Everywhere I go, I’m talking to people.”

The result was the map of the United States, of which Carapella has already sold 3,200 copies and given away an additional 900. The maps are in classrooms, cultural centers and museums across the country. They’re also in homes, on bedroom walls and in researches’ offices.

A documentarian is making a film about Carapella’s project, and Hayden-McNeil, a textbook publishing company, is printing two of the maps in an upcoming book.

But Carapella decided not to stop with a map of the United States. He created additional maps showing locations of tribes—along with their traditional names—in Canada, Alaska, Mexico and Central America. He also offers a map of the entire North American continent identifying more than 1,000 tribes—and without the “artificial boundaries” established later.

“My next map is of South America,” Carapella said. “I don’t think I’m going to stop until I’ve done all the maps in the Western Hemisphere.”

The maps are already changing public perception in places like Olympia, Washington, where the map of the entire North American continent hangs on a wall at the Diversity and Equity Center at South Puget Sound Community College. Program coordinator Karama Blackhorn said it serves as a conversation starter and a way to help indigenous students feel welcome.

Aaron Carapella, a.k.a. the “map guy,” stands near some of his Indian Nations maps on display at the Kansas City Indian Center. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)
Aaron Carapella, a.k.a. the “map guy,” stands near some of his Indian Nations maps on display at the Kansas City Indian Center. (Courtesy Aaron Carapella)

“The biggest problem minority students find is they don’t have a sense of belonging; they don’t see themselves in faculty, staff or other students,” she said. “There’s no Native representation on campus except anthropological. This is a giant, visual art piece that reminds people to stop having that historical mentality.”

Blackhorn, a member of the Kahosadi tribe of Oregon, said she grew up with a map that had only 12 tribes on it. Carapella’s map is the most comprehensive representation of Native America she’s ever seen.

“My family is on the map now,” she said. “This is validating on so many levels.”

In a classroom on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation in Arizona, history teacher William Stearns uses the maps to help students make connections to their own heritage.

“When you see students see these maps you can see the pride in them,” he said. “They stand taller, they understand. I believe that they have a clearer picture of their importance in this country.”

Aaron Carapella, right, works with graphic designer Jon Vanderveer on his map project. (Courtesy Brian McDermott)
Aaron Carapella, right, works with graphic designer Jon Vanderveer on his map project. (Courtesy Brian McDermott)

In an age where few places on the planet remain uncharted, cartography may seem an antiquated craft. But for Carapella, the project is an exploration not of geography, but rather history. In essence, he’s going back in time to capture a view of the land in its pre-colonial state.

For some, the maps are happy reminders of forgotten cultures. For others, they bring up difficult aspects of history or conflicted emotions. Any response, Carapella said, is evidence that he’s doing his job.

“It’s weird how many emotions get stirred up,” he said. “They are factual maps of where our nations were and what they were called, but they spark questions. They make people think in a different way.”

Carapella’s maps are available in various sizes and range in price from $49 to $300. Buy them online here.

 

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2015/04/10/changing-perceptions-and-making-connections-one-map-time-159925

Indigenous Health Conference: Towards Health and Reconcilliation | May 26-27, 2016

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Indigenous Health Conference: Towards Health and Reconcilliation  |  May 26-27, 2016
May 26-27, 2016  |  Hilton Meadowvale, Mississauga ON
PRELIMINARY PROGRAM NOW AVAILABLE!
Our second Indigenous Health Conference will continue to explore the systemic health issues Canada’s Indigenous peoples face.

Speakers will include:

  • Dr. Cindy Blackstock – Reconciliation Means Not Saying Sorry Twice: Remedying Contemporary Inequalities in First Nations Children’s Health and Wellbeing
  • Dr. Barry Lavallee – Removing Culture from Cultural Safety: Structural Challenges to Addressing Indigenous Health in Canada
  • Dr. Ian Mosby – Hunger, Human Experimentation and the Legacy of Residential Schools
PLUS don’t miss our job fair for health care providers who would like to work with Indigenous populations. You can also sponsor an elder or undergraduate student and help send them to the conference!
Register today!
Review conference details at www.cpd.utoronto.ca/indigenoushealth

 

Director, Aboriginal Education, North Island College. Due: Mar 28, 2016

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Posting Preview
Posting Details
Title Director, Aboriginal Education
Posting Number 101116
Posting Date 03-08-2016
Closing Date 03-28-2016
Status Admin-Regular
Position Summary
Reporting to the Assistant Vice President, Access and Regions, the
Director of Aboriginal Education is responsible for the strategic direction of
Aboriginal Education at the College.
Within the context of the College Plan and in conjunction with the Senior
Educational Team (SET), the Director is responsible for the development
and preservation of strategic educational planning relationships with the
First Nations throughout the College region. The Director will implement a
robust process of continuous assessment in program demand in the
pursuit of mutually beneficial opportunities to increase education
accessibility and student enrollment throughout NIC Region. The Director
shall collaborate with Deans, Department Chairs, and the Registrar and
actively participate in the planning of programs, services, policy, and
procedures, which facilitates access, retention, and student success,
within the College community.
The Director is the first point of contact for the Ministry of Advanced
Education, First Nations Councils and School Districts within the College
region on all matters related to Aboriginal education. The Director is
accountable for ensuring the collation of accurate information regarding
the educational needs of the Aboriginal population, sources of funding
available to assist the College in meeting those needs, and collaboration
with SET and those responsible for Aboriginal education, in the
development of funding proposals specifically designed to meet those
needs.
A primary purpose of the position is to build capacity within North Island
College, and to work effectively with First Nations students and faculty
regionally to support and develop the indigenization of the curriculum.
Areas of responsibility include: development of Aboriginal Education Policy
Framework in alignment with CICan Indigenous Protocol commitments;
enhance indigenous-centered services, learning environments, student
and community spaces; and to support the educational goal of First
Nations people in the College region in all matters related to the College
Plan
Please note: The College received special program approval by the BC
Human Rights Tribunal to give preference to the hiring of a person of
Aboriginal ancestry for this position.
Position Competencies – Creates a Positive Climate and Culture
– Effective Communication Skills
– Effectively Develops Goals & Objectives
– Focuses Effectively on Key Results and Priorities
– Demonstrates a Focus on Continuous Improvement
– Interpersonal Effectiveness
– Team Leadership
– Developing Others
– Championing and Adapting to Change
– Collaboration
Duties and Responsibilities
The areas of responsibility include:
1. Educational Leadership;
2. External Communication and Relationship Development;
3. Planning;
4. Financial Management
5. Employee Relations

Description
Required Education & Experience
– The College received special program approval by the BC Human Rights
Tribunal to give preference to the hiring of a person of Aboriginal ancestry
for this position.
– Completion or in progress a Master’s Degree in an appropriate discipline
and demonstrated experience, 3 years’ experience preferred, in a
leadership role in a post-secondary Aboriginal Education setting; which
must include demonstrated management and leadership experience in
Aboriginal Education. Candidates with an undergraduate degree and
considerable experience in Aboriginal Education at a post-secondary
institution, may also be considered.
– A demonstrated record of success in Aboriginal Education and
community development work, resource procurement, grant and proposal
writing and project management.
– Demonstrated experience resolving student concerns, informally and
formally.
Required Knowledge, Skills, & Abilities
– Extensive knowledge of Aboriginal populations within the traditional
territories of thirty-five First Nations inclusive of the Nuu-chah-nulth,
Kwakwaka’wakw and Coast Salish traditions.
– A working knowledge of governance models and related management
approaches.
– Strong interpersonal skills, including communication (written and oral),
negotiation and advocacy skills; particularly in communicating and
consulting with community groups, school districts, industry, local
government agencies, and the College community.
– Demonstrated commitment to collaborative and consultative leadership
and the ability to work effectively within a management team and fastpaced
environment.
– Advanced computer skills as required by the position.
– The ability to plan annual budgets and follow established financial
policies and practices to ensure fiscally responsible management of
expenses.
– The knowledge and ability to implement quality improvement initiatives
and measure outcomes.
– Experience with organizational change practices.
– Experience in the effective management of human resources, within a
unionized workforce and administering collective agreements.
Pay Grade In accordance with the Exempt Administrators’ Salary Scale
Location Campbell River (CR)
Department Assistant Vice-President, Access & Regions
Link to Job Description Director, Aboriginal Education:
https://careers.nic.bc.ca/userfiles/jsp/shared/reports/Report.jsp?time=1457477182219 3/8/2016
Special Instructions to Applicants
Please scan copies of your transcripts into one document for attachment.
If your transcripts are not available at the time of application, please attach
a letter or certificate of confirmation from the educational institution.

Presentation by the Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada. 10 – 11 am, March 5, 2016

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Presentation by the Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

All students and community members are invited to attend a presentation by the Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould, Canada’s newest Attorney General, and a graduate of the UBC Allard School of Law, who will be discussing her vision and role as the Minister of Justice.

Saturday, March 5, 10:00-11:00 AM
Jack Poole Hall, The Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre

Please RSVP for this event as seating is limited. Light refreshments will be served.

Education of Tribes (Indigenous People) in India: Policies, Programmes and Progress. 10:30am–11:30am, Mar 11, 2016

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Education of Tribes (Indigenous People) in India: Policies, Programmes and Progress

When: Friday, March 11, 2016  |  10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Where: Neville Scarfe Building, Room 310

 

k-sujathaThe Educational Administration & Leadership Program (EDAL, Department of Educational Studies), Indigenous Education, and the Faculty of Education Dean’s Office present a seminar by Professor K. Sujatha, Head, Department of Educational Administration, National University of Educational Planning and Administration, New Delhi, India.

Tribes (Indigenous people) in India, who are also called Adivasis (Hindi for “original inhabitants”), constitute 8.9 percent (over 80 million) of the total population of the country and occupy the lowest levels in socio-economic development. There are more than 750 tribal groups with varied socio-cultural traditions. The Constitution of India envisages special measures for socio-economic development of tribes. Consequently both national and state governments have adopted several special policies and programmes for educational development of tribes. This presentation will cover several of these special policies and programmes — including residential schools — for the education of tribes, progress that is being made, and current issues and challenges.

Bio

Professor Sujatha holds a PhD in Educational Anthropology from Andhra University. She has been a Visiting Fellow at New England Univesity in Australia and has consulted with UNESCO, UNICEF, the British Council, the UN Development Programme, and the UN Office for Project Services. She has authored eight books in addition to research papers and articles published in national and international journals. Her specializations include education of disadvantaged groups, educational policy analysis, comparative education in developing countries, and school management.