Indigenous People

Sundance Institute launches new Native Producers Fellowship

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Time Warner Native Producing Fellowship

Sundance Institute deepened its commitment to Native artists by launching a new Native Producers Fellowship, which identifies emerging Native producers and supports their professional development and the development of their projects. Responding to a crucial need to cultivate more Native American producers who can manage production; oversee packaging, financing, and distribution; and engage with the marketplace; this Initiative aims to support the sustainability and longevity of Native artists throughout their careers.

Native Producing Fellowships will follow the model of Sundance Institute’s Creative Producing Fellowships. The Initiative will identify two Fellows and support their attendance at the Sundance Film Festival in January, where they will participate in the Festival’s Native Forum, and at Sundance Institute’s Creative Producing Summit in the summer. Native Producing Fellows will be considered for ongoing support and opportunities within the Institute’s Creative Producing Initiative and Creative Producers Lab after they participate in the Native Program’s Producers Fellowship.

Applications for Feature Film, Documentary, and Short Film will be accepted.

click to apply

For any questions, please email Native_Program@sundance.org

Federal Appeals Court To Hear Gitxaala Lawsuit To Stop Pipeline

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Vancouver, BC – September 26, 2014 — The Federal Court of Appeal has granted leave to Gitxaala Nation to apply for Judicial Review to challenge the approval of the Northern Gateway Pipelines Project. The Court’s decision on leave means the Court will hear and decide on the Gitxaala Nation’s lawsuit challenging Cabinet’s approval of the Enbridge Project.

Due to the number of lawsuits that have been filed, and the number of parties involved, it is unlikely that the Court will hear submissions for several months. In the meantime, several parties are expected to file evidence with the Court and seek direction as to how the lawsuits will proceed. It’s possible that the Court will decide to hear all the cases together. Read more…

Marshallese poet Receives Standing Ovation at UN Climate Leaders Summit

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Marshallese poet Kathy Jetnil-Kijiner speaks on behalf of civil society during the opening ceremony of the UN Climate Leaders Summit in New York City. Check out this high-quality version of Kathy’s poem with footage of climate action around the world.

Kathy performed a new poem entitled “Dear Matafele Peinem”, written to her daughter. The poem received a standing ovation. Kathy is also a teacher, journalist and founder of the environmental NGO, Jo-jikum.

DNA analysis of sweet potatoes suggests that Polynesians reached Americas before Europeans

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New DNA analysis of sweet potatoes, which were first cultivated in the Americas, suggests that Polynesians reached the New World long before Columbus.

The prevailing theory about the “rediscovery” of the American continents used to be such a simple tale. Most people are familiar with it: In 1492, Christopher Columbus sailed the ocean blue. Then that theory was complicated when, in 1960, archaeologists discovered a site in Canada’s Newfoundland, called L’Anse aux Meadows, which proved that Norse explorers likely beat Columbus to the punch by about 500 years.
Now startling new DNA evidence promises to complicate the story even more. It turns out that it was not Columbus or the Norse — or any Europeans at all — who first rediscovered the Americas. It was actually the Polynesians.
All modern Polynesian peoples can trace their origins back to a sea-migrating Austronesian people who were the first humans to discover and populate most of the Pacific islands, including lands as far-reaching as Hawaii, New Zealand and Easter Island. Despite the Polynesians’ incredible sea-faring ability, however, few theorists have been willing to say that Polynesians could have made it as far east as the Americas. That is, until now. Read More…

CALL FOR PAPERS: Eleventh Conference of the International Association of Genocide Scholars

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*CALL FOR PAPERS*

*Eleventh Conference of the International Association of Genocide Scholars *

*July 16-19, 2014, Winnipeg-Canada*

*Time, Movement, and Space: Genocide Studies and Indigenous Peoples*

2014 marks an important year for Winnipeg and Canada. In this year, the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR) will open its doors to the general public. Established by Parliament through amendments to the Museums Act on March 13, 2008, which came into force on August 10, 2008, the CMHR is envisioned as a national and international destination – a centre of learning where Canadians and people from around the world can engage in discussion and commit to taking action against hate and oppression. Also in this year, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada will release its final report, after five years of hearings and research into Canada’s history and legacy of the forced assimilation of Indigenous children through residential schools.

These momentous local developments present an opportunity for genocide scholars to visit Winnipeg and engage in discussion about colonial control over, expansion into, appropriation and settlement of Indigenous territories. Such issues raise questions of time, movement, knowledge and space in Canada and other places around the globe where Indigenous people have been victims of genocidal destruction: How do destructive processes such as genocide form and take shape over time and across space? In what ways do time, movement, territory, space, and place factor into the study of genocide? How are spaces and places mobilized in the destruction of Indigenous groups? How do the spatial and temporal aspects of colonial and settler genocide compare and contrast with those of other genocides? How does territory contribute to the persistence of groups, and from whose perspective, as well as to the mechanisms required for genocide’s redress?
How might we envision new spaces for cohabitation and reconciliation in the aftermath of, or amidst ongoing, genocidal processes? And what technological and other means do institutions such as the CMHR have available to accommodate Indigenous knowledge and authentically represent Indigenous experiences of genocide?

The University of Manitoba sits in Treaty One territory and at the crossroads of the Anishnabe, Métis, Cree, Dakota and Oji-Cree Nations.
Winnipeg is thus a fitting location for our discussions, as it is a space long marked by the movements and interactions among peoples, including the destructive movements of settler colonialism. The inauguration of the CMHR and the release of the Final Report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada will further contribute to our conversations, as both will, in their own way, raise the spectre of genocide.

The conference will also feature a trip to Sagkeeng First Nation at the southern top of Lake Winnipeg, where it meets the Winnipeg River. We will be guests at Turtle Lodge (http://www.theturtlelodge.org/) and Elder David Courchene will introduce us to Anishnabe teachings as they relate to healing, survival, and resurgence. We will be announcing other stimulating conference events in the months to come.

The IAGS and the University of Manitoba welcome papers and sessions related to our conference theme of “Time, Movement, and Space: Genocide Studies and Indigenous Peoples.” Innovative panels, workshops, and papers that consider the spatial and temporal issues as applied to Indigenous genocide and its commemoration are particularly encouraged, as are comparative studies.
Besides panels and papers, the organizers invite other modes of dialogue, including workshops, roundtable discussions, cultural media, artistic works/readings, and forums that relate to policy initiatives, pedagogy, and education. Scholars, practitioners, and students interested in genocide studies from all disciplines are encouraged to apply. While our theme is centered on Indigenous issues, we also encourage innovative and original papers about other genocides. As 2014 marks the 20th anniversary of the Rwandan genocide, we are eager to accept papers on this genocide.

Papers will be accepted in English and should be sent as an attachment to the following email address: iagswinnipeg2014@gmail.com

Once the proposals are accepted by the selection committee, participants are required to register on-line at: www.genocidescholars.org where IAGS and conference material will be found. All participants must be IAGS members.

Please prepare your abstract for a 15 minute paper.

If you do not receive acknowledgement of receipt of your abstract within a week of submission, please contact us at: iagswinnipeg2014@gmail.com

You will be informed 4 weeks from the date of submission whether your paper has been accepted or not.

*Spaces may fill up, so we encourage early submissions.*

Abstracts should include full name, affiliation, a brief biography, e-mail address, and be no more than 250 words, using single-spaced in 12-point Times New Roman font. They can be sent from now until *January 17th 2014*to iagswinnipeg2014@gmail.com

Any questions may be directed to the conference organizers, Andrew Woolford, Adam Muller, and Donna-Lee Frieze at: iagswinnipeg2014@gmail.com

article of interest

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Philippines: Philippines’ Isolated Indigenous Peoples Shut Off From Haiyan Relief

Far from cities and supplies, remote communities struggle to survive after losing lives, homes and boats to typhoon
In the wake of Typhoon Haiyan, which killed an untold number of people, displaced 630,000 and devastated central Philippines, the country’s indigenous peoples—most of whom are located in isolated, forested communities, far away from cities and supplies—are emerging as among the worst hit.
As they struggle to survive and assess damage to the natural resources they preserve and maintain for their incomes and food, an estimated 1,600 indigenous families are struggling to secure basic supplies that could help them to survive–and rebuild their lives.
The indigenous Tagbanua communities, spread out across the Calamianes, a group of islands in the southwest province of Palawan, were severely impacted when the typhoon made its sixth landfall….   (read more)

2014 Senior Indigenous Fellow – OHCHR

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OHCHR

INDIGENOUS PEOPLES AND MINORITIES SECTION

 TERMS OF REFERENCE

 2014 SENIOR INDIGENOUS FELLOW

Duration:       2 June –  30 September 2014

Location:        Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Section, Geneva – Switzerland

The Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Section (IPMS) of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) is seeking an indigenous person to fill the position of “Senior Fellow” for a duration of four months (2 June – 30 September 2014).

The Senior Indigenous Fellowship aims at giving the selected indigenous person a better understanding of the international human rights system and mechanisms, especially those dealing with indigenous issues. Through this experience, the Senior Fellow will gain practical knowledge and working level experience by directly contributing to the programmes and activities of the IPMS. Such exposure will also allow him/her to develop an extensive contact network with OHCHR staff in general, as well as other UN departments or agencies and human rights NGOs in Geneva.

The Senior Fellow is expected to return to his/her home country with an enhanced set of skills and expertise to contribute towards the promotion and protection of human rights of indigenous peoples at the national, regional or international level.

Terms of reference:

The Senior Indigenous Fellow will be working in the Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Section of OHCHR under the guidance and supervision of the Chief of Section and the Coordinator of the Indigenous Fellowship Programme and will be requested to:

–       Contribute to the activities of the Section by undertaking research and analysis, participating in the organization and implementation of training activities, such as the Indigenous Fellowship Programme, providing support to the work of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and the Voluntary Fund for Indigenous Populations.

–       Perform any other activity to contribute to the work of the Section, including administrative or logistic tasks.

Qualifications:

The candidate must be indigenous. He/she should have:

  • A university degree preferably in law, political sciences, international relations or any other disciplines related to human rights.
  • Basic understanding of international human rights instruments and mechanisms, including those specifically dealing with the rights of indigenous peoples.
  • Minimum of four years of working experience in the field of indigenous peoples’ rights.
  • He/she should be fluent in English. Other language skills including Spanish, French or Russian are highly desirable.

Entitlements:

The candidate selected will not receive a salary but will be entitled to a monthly stipend that will cover basic living expenses in Geneva, as well as return ticket and basic health insurance. Please note that this is not a regular employment position within OHCHR and it does not lead to employment rights and entitlements beyond the terms of the fellowship.

Selection process:

Interested candidates should submit their applications by fax (+41 22 917 90 08) with a cover letter indicating “Application to the 2014 Senior Indigenous Fellowship” or by post at:

Indigenous Peoples and Minorities Section

Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

UNOG-OHCHR

CH-1211 Geneva 10

Switzerland

Although we do not encourage you to send your application by email, scanned applications can also be received at the following address: fellowship@ohchr.org    The application should include the following documents:

1) A Curriculum Vitae.

2) A letter of motivation (maximum 3 pages), in which the candidate will introduce himself/herself – mentioning the indigenous community he/she belongs to – explain his/her expectations, what he/she hopes to achieve through this fellowship and what he/she expects to do upon return to promote indigenous rights.

3) A letter of recommendation from the organization / entity they are affiliated with.

The deadline to receive applications is: 17 January 2014. Please note that only short-listed applicants will be contacted and interviewed during the first quarter of 2014. Once the selection is finalized, the name of the candidate selected will be posted on our website.

Call for Presenters – Integrating Indigenous Traditional Culture and Practices in Health Care

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presented by Indigenous Gatherings

February 18th – 19th 2014 – Calgary, Alberta, CANADA

Call for Workshop Proposals – Deadline November 22nd, 2013

 

The “Integrating Traditional Indigenous Culture and Practices into Health Care Conference” is designed to facilitate the transmission of knowledge between indigenous peoples. We extend a heartfelt invitation to our indigenous partners to share knowledge that will contribute to the well-being of our Indigenous Peoples. We are also aware that many non-indigenous persons have made significant, meaningful contributions in health care delivery and we also invite these presenters to submit their proposals, provided that explicit permission of the indigenous group/organization that one is representing has been obtained.

Ultimately, each presenter is responsible for their own presentation. Please come to our conference with respect for each other. Indigenous Gatherings is promoting workshops that embrace Indigenous Knowledge. Presenters are encouraged to provide strategies that are practical and immediately applicable. All workshops will be 1–1.5 hour long including time for questions and discussions.

All presenters and co-presenters must pay registration fee. Complete and submit a separate registration form for each presenter/co-presenter.

Handouts: Power point presentations, handouts, must be pre-sent via email to  igatherings@gmail.com to be included in the Conference Binder. You will be notified on the number copies of materials for participants. Copy services will NOT be available at the site.

 

Email: igatherings@gmail.com

Website: www.indigenousgatherings.ca

Certificate Program in Aboriginal Language Revitalization

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Certificate Program in Aboriginal Language Revitalization -

LING 180A: Dynamics of Indigenous Language offered at the En’owkin Centre in Penticton, BC.

The Healthy Aboriginal Network – Non-profit promotion of health, literacy & wellness

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The Healthy Aboriginal Network is excited to release a new resource today. And for those of you that were on vacation this summer, or just weren’t able to check out our other near-release resources, two re-releases:

United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) poster series

We were tremendously lucky to receive funding this spring to create a UNCRC poster series, with an Aboriginal youth focus. There are 42 posters in all – one for each Right. Please check out www.thehealthyaboriginal.net/UNCRC to see a preview. We are selling the posters in sets of 42 (no individual poster sales) for around $228, which includes shipping and taxes. If you are interested in buying a set please send an email to sean@thehealthyaboriginal.net with your address and we will send you an invoice. If you are having trouble seeing the new pages, refresh your browser (that swirly icon to the far right of the website you’re visiting).

Financial literacy comic book

We all think we know what happens to our money – how much we make and where we spend it. And if we’re asked whether impulse buys and payday loans are a good idea, we all likely know that the answer is ‘no’. But making the right decision at the right time can be hard to do. In The Game Plan, check out how money all finally makes sense to Jake once he relates it to his lacrosse aspirations. There is a preview and pricing at www.thehealthyaboriginal.net and the book can be ordered by sending an email with your address to sean@thehealthyaboriginal.net.

Residential school comic book and augmented reality rear cover

With so much attention on the Reconciliation Canada event in Vancouver this September, we thought it prudent to remind people that we released a residential school book this spring. The story is similar to testimony heard at the Truth and Reconciliation events, so it can be a tough story to read. But if you’re looking to educate youth on what happened to us as Native people, you’ll have a hard time finding a better resource. There is a preview and pricing at www.thehealthyaboriginal.net. Please send an email to sean@thehealthyaboriginal.net with your address if you’d like to order.

There is also a bonus on the rear outside cover. To see it, download the free Layar App from the store on your Android or iPhone. Open the App and point the camera at our cover (also available here – www.thehealthyaboriginal.net/augmented/images/IRS_ad.pdf) to trigger a survivor’s story. You won’t be disappointed.

We hope you continue to find us relevant to youth’s needs,

Sean Muir

Executive Director

3240 Comox Road    Courtenay , BC   V9N 3P8

Phone 250-941-8881   sean@thehealthyaboriginal.net

A BC incorporated non-profit Society