indigenous peoples

Celebrating indigenous culture through animated film

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Ten inspiring animated shorts from 2016

December 29, 2016

With films like Pocahontas, Apocalypto, Peter Pan and The Green Inferno, it’s safe to say that Hollywood has a deplorable track record when it comes to its portrayal of Indigenous Peoples. Perhaps it’s to be expected given that films tend to be produced through a Eurocentric lens. Even when production companies try to get it right, they still somehow manage to fail–such as the case with Disney’s Moana.

It makes us all the more grateful that Hollywood has lost its monopoly on film. New Independent film makers are constantly emerging to give us something genuine, heartfelt and inspired to watch with family and friends.

This year was particularly exciting for indigenous film. Among the hundreds–if not, thousands–of feature films, documentaries and television shows that indigenous filmmakers made in 2016, indigenous nations started releasing their own independently-produced films to tell their own stories in their own words and languages.

We also saw a sturdy wave of truly inspiring animated shorts that celebrate indigenous culture, breathing new life into the incredibly rich and equally important tradition of storytelling.

We loved these animated shorts so much we just had to share them with you. Read more…

 

Source: Schertow, John Ahni. January 18, 2017. Celebrating indigenous culture through animated film. Retrieved from:  https://intercontinentalcry.org/celebrating-indigenous-culture-animated-film/

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CFP – Essays on The Indigenous Everyday. Due: May 15, 2017

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Call for Papers: Essays on The Indigenous Everyday
Your auntie dies and you get a letter from the Secretary of the Interior—who knew they cared? You have a fantasy of punching—no, scalping—that guy in the PTA who just said to you: “I have Indian blood too, but not enough to get money.”  Once again, you draw the unhappy chore at a cocktail party of explaining what was not cool about Buffalo Soldiers, President Lincoln, and The Revenant. Also not cool: naming a dog “Denali.” Like everyone else, you go home for the holidays. But you also go home for ceremonies to grieve the losses of the last two centuries: relatives lost in battlefields, museums, boarding schools. You say the Lord’s Prayer in your Native language because you can. Not because you believe it. Or maybe you do.
             What is your riff on The Indigenous Everyday? How does history live and breathe and sometimes completely ruin the ordinary stuff of life? What do you wish non-Natives understood about indigenous experience, history and culture—the good, the bad, and the absurdly beautiful? What riffs do you tell your friends to get you through? How do you, in Charlie Hill’s words, “turn poison into medicine”?
            Our proposed essay collection, I [Heart] Nixon: Essays on the Indigenous Everyday, seeks complete manuscripts of creative nonfiction—personal essays, riffs, mixed-genre pieces and prose poems—that reveal the quotidian pain and ordinary beauty of indigenous life today. We aim for a collection that deftly incorporates humor, history, and individual voice from a range of writers. We invite submissions from writers in the United States, Canada, and the indigenous Pacific.  When applicable, submissions should include a short bibliography “For Further Reading” at the end of the piece, as we aim to market this collection to high school, university, and popular readers. No in-text citations, please! The publisher will be announced later this fall.
            Complete manuscripts should be formatted double-spaced, one-inch margins, in 12-point Times New Roman font.
            Complete manuscripts are due May 15, 2017.
            Send manuscripts to: nixon.anthology@gmail.com
            Questions? Contact Beth H. Piatote and Philip J. Deloria, co-editors, I [Heart] Nixon: Essays on the Indigenous Everyday, at nixon.anthology@gmail.com

 

Inuk woman from the Kivalliq wins national quilting award

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Inuk woman from the Kivalliq wins national quilting award

Veronica Puskas wins an award for excellence at Quilt Canada’s national juried show

CBC News Posted: Jun 26, 2014 5:57 AM CTLast Updated: Jun 26, 2014 12:43 PM CT

Veronica Puskas, who grew up in Nunavut’s Kivalliq region, won the award for Excellence in Work by a first-time exhibitor award at Quilt Canada’s national juried show in St. Catharines, Ont.

Veronica Puskas, who grew up in Nunavut’s Kivalliq region, won the award for Excellence in Work by a first-time exhibitor award at Quilt Canada’s national juried show in St. Catharines, Ont. (Courtesy Veronica Puskas)

(Note: CBC does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of external links.)

A former resident of Nunavut and the Northwest Territories has been recognized at a national quilt show.

Veronica Puskas, who grew up in Nunavut’s Kivalliq region, won the award for Excellence in Work by a first-time exhibitor award at Quilt Canada’s national juried show in St. Catharines, Ont.

Veronica Puskas quilt

Veronica Puskas’ quilt, called ‘Pillars of Strength,’ is based on a photo of her mother and grandmother at the Meliadine River near Rankin Inlet in 1950. (Canadian Quilters’ Association)

Her quilt, called Pillars of Strength, is based on a photo of her mother and grandmother at the Meliadine River near Rankin Inlet in 1950.

Puskas says the quilt honours her grandmother, but making it also helped her.

“I hope to encourage people that are going through difficult times that through doing some artwork or doing something to make something beautiful is very cathartic,” she says. “It helps you deal with the emotions and the hurt while doing it.”

Puskas says she started working on the project many years ago and then set it aside. In the end, it was truly a labour of love.

Veronica Puskas quilt (detail)

Detail from Pillars of Strength. (Canadian Quilters’ Association)

“Mom used to tell us you can do better than that and that’s all I kept hearing.”

Puskas’ quilt was selected out of about 80 entries in her category.

Marilyn Michelin, chair of the event, says Puskas’ skill is remarkable.

“To do people in a picture is just unbelievable,” she says. “The talent that people have for that.”

Puskas now lives in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario.

She says she’ll keep using Nunavut and the North as inspiration for future projects.

Nuliavuk

Nuliavuk by Veronica Puskas was recently displayed at a local exhibit in Ontario. (Yellowknife Quilters’ Guild)

Reference:

(2016, January 18) Inuk woman from the Kivalliq wins national quilting award. CBC News. Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/inuk-woman-from-the-kivalliq-wins-national-quilting-award-1.2688197?cmp=abfb

Aboriginal Mental Health and Wellness Training at UBC – Oct 1, 2015

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Dear grad students,
NITEP is hosting a new student program that provides resources and ways to be a peer support helper/trainer for mental health and wellness. There is space for interested Aboriginal students to participate, especially in the morning session. Please contact Jessica LaRochelle if you are interested in attending this training workshop. Regards, Jo-ann
_____________________
Thursday, October 1: Mental Health and Wellness Training

This FREE training is open to all Aboriginal students at UBC. Students will learn about Mental Health and Wellness, gain valuable professional development, and find out how they can access resources through the UBC Wellness Centre and other local support services. Topics include (but not limited to) Self-Care and Boundaries, Providing Support to Students in Distress, Respectful Relationships within Aboriginal Communities, and Building a Support System.

Thursday, October 1
8:30 AM – 12:15 PM (12:45-4:00 sessions optional for non-NITEP students)
Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall, First Nations Longhouse

RSVP to jessica.larochelle@ubc.ca. Continental Breakfast and hot lunch will be provided. Include your name, faculty, and any allergies/dietary restrictions in your email. RSVP as soon as possible.  The afternoon session is now optional for non-NITEP students as it will focus more on their roles as NITEP Wellness Resource people.

White House renames Mount McKinley as Denali on eve of trip

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White House renames Mount McKinley as Denali on eve of trip

Updated 10:16 pm, Tuesday, September 1, 2015

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration will change the name of North America’s tallest mountain peak from Mount McKinley to Denali, the White House said Sunday, a major symbolic gesture to Alaska Natives on the eve of President Barack Obama’s historic visit to Alaska.

By renaming the peak Denali, an Athabascan word meaning “the high one,” Obama waded into a sensitive and decades-old conflict between residents of Alaska and Ohio. Alaskans have informally called the mountain Denali for years, but the federal government recognizes its name invoking the 25th president, William McKinley, who was born in Ohio and assassinated early in his second term.

“With our own sense of reverence for this place, we are officially renaming the mountain Denali in recognition of the traditions of Alaska Natives and the strong support of the people of Alaska,” said Interior Secretary Sally Jewell.

Ohio politicians reacted angrily, although it wasn’t immediately clear if or how they could stop it. Rep. Bob Gibbs, R-Ohio, said McKinley deserved to be honored, and invited his colleagues to join him to try to block what he called Obama’s “constitutional overreach.”

“This political stunt is insulting to all Ohioans, and I will be working with the House Committee on Natural Resources to determine what can be done to prevent this action,” Gibbs said.

The announcement came as Obama prepared to open a three-day visit to Alaska aimed at infusing fresh urgency into his call to action on climate change. To the dismay of some Alaska Republicans, the White House has choreographed the trip to showcase melting glaciers and other cherished natural wonders in Alaska that Obama says are threatened by warmer temperatures.

But Obama’s visit is also geared toward displaying solidarity with Alaska Natives, who face immense economic challenges and have warned of insufficient help from the federal government. As his first stop after arriving in Anchorage on Monday, Obama planned to hold a listening session with Alaska Natives. The president was also expected to announce new steps to help Alaska Native communities on Wednesday when he becomes the first sitting president to visit the Alaska Arctic. Read More…

Exhibit – Trading Routes: Rivers, Fish and Oil, Apr 11 at 4:30- 6:30

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Kit Grauer and Ruth Beer (Emily Carr University) are pleased to extend an invitation to see their exhibit Trading Routes:Rivers,Fish and Oil at the Gulf of Georgia Cannery, National Historic site, Steveston, BC. The opening is Saturday, April 11 at 4:30- 6:30

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