Indigenous Research

Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Community-Engaged Adolescent Mental Health, Simon Fraser University.

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Simon Fraser University invites applications for a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair (CRC) in Community-Engaged Adolescent Mental Health.

The proposed Chair will be embedded at SFU Surrey – a vibrant community hub located in one of Canada’s fastest-growing cities. S/he will take a leadership role in building research capacity that benefits the City of Surrey, and that will have important implications for adolescent mental health in British Columbia, across Canada, and beyond. The Chair will work closely with City of Surrey partners from multiple sectors such as health (including the Fraser Health Authority and its regional Child and Youth Mental Health Substance Use program), education, law enforcement, social services, government, and community partners. The Chair will also create ties with other researchers working in the area of adolescent mental health and mental health policy. The Surrey-based CRC holds promise for increasing linkages with the Surrey community and strengthening SFU’s research presence in this city and beyond. Over time, it is anticipated that this Chair will leverage his/her Surrey-based research program to capitalize on innovative developments and collaborative research opportunities at the local, national, and international levels.

We are seeking an outstanding and innovative researcher who is internationally-recognized in the field of adolescent mental health with a focus on one or more of the following areas: program implementation and evaluation; diversity and culturally sensitive programming; determinants of mental health; and intersectoral and upstream approaches to enhancing mental health. The preferred candidate could have a disciplinary background in health, education, or the social sciences (e.g., psychology).

The successful candidate will play a leadership role in establishing a cutting-edge, community-relevant research facility and lead a research program focused on the advancement of community-based and clinically relevant strategies designed to maximize the mental health of young people.

This position is contingent upon the applicant being awarded a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair; therefore, only senior investigators with outstanding publication records and a proven track record of working with communities and developing research centres/institutes will be considered. The position is tenable for seven years and renewable. Please review the initial appointment and chair renewal details of the CRC Program.

Application Process:

Applicants should submit:

1) a full curriculum vitae
2) the names of six academic referees
3) a 3-4 page document summarizing their qualifications for the Chair and a proposed vision for developing a program of research, including a training program and leadership plan.

All applications should be submitted to:

Dr. Joy Johnson
Chair, Adolescent Mental Health CRC Search Committee
Vice-President, Research
Simon Fraser University
vpres@sfu.ca

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority. Simon Fraser University is committed to employment equity and encourages applications from all qualified women and men, including visible minorities, aboriginal people, and persons with disabilities.

The position is subject to the availability of funding and to final approval by the University Board of Governors and the Tri-agency Institutional Programs Secretariat.

The competition will remain open until the position is filled. Screening of applications will commence on January 31, 2017.

All applications will be reviewed by the Search Committee. The Committee will recommend one candidate for ratification by the faculty member’s home department or school. The Faculty in which the CRC is to be situated will be determined based on best-fit once an appropriate candidate is nominated. The successful applicant will work with the department/Faculty and the Major Projects Office to develop a full proposal for submission to the CRC Secretariat.

Under the authority of the University Act, personal information that is required by the University for academic appointments will be collected. For further details, please see the Collection Notice.

Kent State University Political Science – Open Rank Tenure Track Position

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Kent State University Political Science – Open Rank Tenure Track Position Location: Kent State University, OH, USA | Department: Department of Political Science | Deadline: open until filled
The Department of Political Science at Kent State University invites applications for a tenure-track position, open with regard to region and rank, in Comparative Politics, to begin in August 2017. We seek scholars studying marginalization, structures of oppression, and the politics of dissent, with potential topics including, but not limited to: identities (race, gender, sexualities, ethnicity), global inequality, settler colonialism, migration, borders, and labor…[Read More]

 

SAGE Coffee and Catch-up dates 2017

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Dear SAGE Community!

We are going to continue the coffee sessions each Wednesday from 10:30-11:30 in the FNHL board room. Some weeks we will have speakers and other weeks it is just a chance for us all to catch up and check in.

So book these dates in!
January 18th 10:30-11:30
January 25th 10:30-11:30
February 01st 10:30-11:30
February 08th 10:30-11:30
February 15th 10:30-11:30
February 22nd (NO Coffee Morning – Term Break)
March 01st 10:30-11:30
March 08th 10:30-11:30
March 115th 10:30-11:30

15th Annual Indigenous Graduate Student Symposium, March 10-11, 2017.

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Revitalizing, Remembering, and Retelling for Reconcili-Action

Friday, March 10, 2016  5:00 – 8:00 pm

Saturday, March 11, 2016  9:00 am – 5:00 pm,

 

This event will take place at SFU Harbour Centre, Vancouver, on the unceded and ancestral territories of the xʷməθkwəy̓əm, Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, and səlil̓wətaʔɬ First Nations

 

Friday Evening Speaker – Khelsilem (Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Language Teacher, Kwi Awt Stelmexw)

Saturday Key Note Speaker – Chief Robert Joseph (Reconciliation Canada Ambassador)

 

In the era of the Truth and Reconciliation Calls to Action – including calls for universities to act – we ask symposium attendees and presenters to consider the following theme: ‘Revitalizing, Remembering, and Retelling for Reconcili-Action’. This year the Indigenous Graduate Student Symposium (IGSS) invites submissions that explore transformation through ‘Reconcili-Action’ by thinking about how research interacts with the TRC Calls to Action and how this process shapes research and experiences in the academy. 

Please let us know if you have any questions: grad.sage@ubc.ca

Hosted by the IGSS Planning Committee & SAGE (Supporting Aboriginal Graduate Enhancement)

Simon Fraser University, The University of British Columbia and SAGE Partnership

SSHERC’s New Guidelines for Merit Review of Aboriginal Research

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Purpose

SSHRC has developed these guidelines to ensure that the merit review of Aboriginal research upholds SSHRC’s principles for merit review. These guidelines are intended to supplement the SSHRC Manual for Adjudication Committee Members, but might also be used by applicants, external reviewers and the postsecondary institutions and partnering organizations that support Aboriginal research.

Context

Aboriginal research is defined under the Definitions of Terms on SSHRC’s website.

Since the early 2000s, SSHRC has promoted research by and with Aboriginal Peoples, having recognized its potential to increase knowledge and understanding about human thought and behaviour, past and present, and to help create a better future.

The Guidelines for the Merit Review of Aboriginal Research further ensure that Aboriginal research incorporating Aboriginal knowledge systems (including ontologies, epistemologies and methodologies) is recognized as a scholarly contribution and meets SSHRC’s standards of excellence. The guidelines are also designed to encourage that Aboriginal research be conducted with sensitivity, and only after consideration about who conducts the research and why and how it is conducted. The guidelines complement information contained in the second edition of the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (TCPS2), and, in particular, Chapter 9: Research Involving the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples of Canada.

These guidelines are relevant for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal researchers who conduct Aboriginal research.

Merit Review Measures in Place

For applications related to Aboriginal research, SSHRC ensures that:

  • external assessors, either Aboriginal or non-Aboriginal, have experience and expertise in Aboriginal research; and
  • when the volume of applications warrants it, adjudication committees are in part or entirely composed of members having community research experience and expertise in Aboriginal research.

SSHRC may solicit external assessments from experts in fields of inquiry relevant to the applications, to aid the adjudication committee in making its decisions.

Key Concepts for the Merit Review of Aboriginal Research

Indigenous or traditional knowledge, according to Chapter 9 of the TCPS2, “is usually described by Aboriginal Peoples as holistic, involving body, mind, feelings and spirit” (p.108). Indigenous knowledge is rarely acquired through written documents, but, rather, a worldview adopted through living, listening and learning in the ancestral languages and within the contexts of living on the land. Engagement with elders and other knowledge holders is acknowledged as valued and vital to knowledge transmission within the context of Aboriginal Peoples living in place. Both Aboriginal knowledge content and processes of knowledge transmission are, thus, embedded in the performance of living, including storytelling, ceremonies, living on the land, the use of natural resources and medicine plants, arts and crafts, singing and dancing, as well as engagement with the more than human world.

Reciprocity is considered an important value in Aboriginal ways of knowing, in that it emphasizes the mutuality of knowledge giving and receiving. In the context of research, and, more specifically, SSHRC’s evaluation criteria, the emphasis on a co-creation model should result in reciprocity in the form of partnerships and collaborative practices, which can include: identification of research objectives and methods; conduct of the research; ethical research protocols; data analysis and presentation; and transmission of knowledge. It also recognizes that access and benefits are, thus, integrally connected.

Community, in the context of Aboriginal research, can refer to places or land-based communities, as well as thematic communities and communities of practice. Furthermore, community-based, community-initiated and community-driven research can involve varying degrees of community engagement; the research outputs will be negotiated taking into account the interests of relevant Aboriginal community members.

Respect, relevance and contributions are important considerations in the merit review of Aboriginal research. Applications should demonstrate that the proposed research identifies and respects relevant community research protocols and current goals, as well as the contributions to and from the community that are likely to emerge or are in place. A respectful research relationship necessitates a deep level of collaboration and ethical engagement. This may include engaging with existing, distinctive research processes and protocols for conducting ethical research reviews in the community; learning within language and/or traditional knowledge systems; collaboratively rebuilding or revitalizing processes that have been displaced or replaced; and/or codeveloping new processes, based on the community’s expressed interests. Finally, this level of collaboration and engagement may also require additional, targeted consultative or review processes.

The following points are intended to assist committee members when reviewing Aboriginal research proposals.

Committee members evaluating research grant applications should use the following list of considerations in relation to the specific evaluation criteria used in assessing grant proposals (i.e., Challenge, Feasibility and Capability).

Committee members evaluating applications for fellowships and scholarships should use the following list of considerations in their review of proposed programs of study or programs of work, as well as in their general assessment of a candidate’s academic capability. While some of these considerations relate more strongly to aspects of SSHRC’s grants programming, they also offer relevant guidance for the review of proposals for doctoral and postdoctoral support.

1. Challenge—The aim and importance of the endeavour:

  • Given the emphasis placed on lived experience, both written and oral literature are appropriate forms of knowledge for consideration. Examples of oral literature can include interviews or personal encounters, or traditional teaching with elders.
  • Theoretical framework and methodology may be combined. For example, in storytelling, the stories represent in some instances both theory and method, a way of explaining phenomena or illustrating how behaviour or actions contribute to living in a good way.
  • Community involvement and the co-creation of knowledge, as appropriate, are considered essential, especially in data interpretation. In this context, the co-creation of knowledge could include interpretative approaches that are jointly developed, reviewed and confirmed by and with community members or their community-delegated organization.
  • Where appropriate, priority should be given to Aboriginal students and postdoctoral researchers when training opportunities are offered.

2. Feasibility—The plan to achieve excellence:

  • The research should address the needs of each partner, if applicable, and demonstrate how the research meets these identified needs.
  • The application should demonstrate how outputs will be made available to, and potentially used by, Aboriginal Peoples and other stakeholders, with community benefits configured into the research outputs. Examples of outreach may include: websites, videos, presentations, artistic or community exhibits, performances, or festivals.
  • The availability and nature of organizational or administrative infrastructure varies from community to community. This aspect should be considered in the structuring of the research in ways that acknowledge and maximize the contributions of a community partner organization.
  • Where required by the funding opportunity, the leveraging of cash and/or in-kind support from host institutions and partners can include social capital, an asset that may emphasize social and familial relationships and networks and may affect the cost of research. Furthermore, linguistic capital, the ability to engage in the community with the ancestral language(s) of the community and a national language of Canada, can also be considered as a contribution.
  • Expectations about the management and governance of the coproduction and outputs of knowledge and related support, during and beyond the award, should be outlined.

3. Capability—The expertise to succeed:

  • The career and academic stages, as well as the rates of research and publication contributions, of applicants and team members need to be reviewed with respect to the following considerations:
    • Aboriginal scholars may have had to start their academic path later in life, or have had interruptions.
    • For some scholars, there are expectations that they significantly contribute to and engage with their home community.
    • Applicants’ accountability to their postsecondary community is also important, as demonstrated by Aboriginal scholars providing support that could include providing student support, teacher training, committee work, and cultural sensitivity training to non-Aboriginal scholars; and contributing to the incorporation of Aboriginal knowledge systems, language, culture and experiences into their postsecondary institutions, including through the creation of associated programs.
    • In the Special Circumstances section, reviewers should take into account the degree of difficulty in an applicant’s career as a useful measure of merit, especially where they have succeeded in overcoming career obstacles.
    • The relevant experience of Aboriginal scholars should take into account the life/knowledge journey of individuals.
  • Collaborators who are considered to have a strong role and community connection should be regarded favourably in the review of Aboriginal research. In particular, elders and community-based partners need to be recognized and respected in terms of their contribution of knowledge assets.

Source: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. Guidelines for Merit Review of Aboriginal Research Retrieved from: http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/funding-financement/merit_review-evaluation_du_merite/guidelines_research-lignes_directrices_recherche-eng.aspx on August 1, 2016

Upcoming Defences

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Tuesday, 9 August 2016 – 4:00pm – Room 200

Mascha Gugganig
Department: Anthropology
Learnscapes on Kaua’i: Education at a Hawaiian-Focused Charter School, a Food Sovereignty Movement, and the Agricultural Biotechnology Industry

Wednesday, 31 August 2016 – 12:30pm – Room 200

Brooke Madden
Department: Curriculum and Pedagogy
(Un)Becoming Teacher of School-Based Aboriginal Education: Early Career Teachers, Teacher Identity, and Aboriginal Education Across Institutions

Inner Peace? The Dalai Lama Made a Website for That

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The Dalai Lama spoke about the Atlas of Emotions study at the Wilson House on the Sisters of St. Francis’ Assisi Heights campus in Rochester, Minn. Credit Tim Gruber for The New York Times

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The Dalai Lama, who tirelessly preaches inner peace while chiding people for their selfish, materialistic ways, has commissioned scientists for a lofty mission: to help turn secular audiences into more self-aware, compassionate humans.

That is, of course, no easy task. So the Dalai Lama ordered up something with a grand name to go with his grand ambitions: a comprehensive Atlas of Emotions to help the more than seven billion people on the planet navigate the morass of their feelings to attain peace and happiness.

“It is my duty to publish such work,” the Dalai Lama said.

To create this “map of the mind,” as he called it, the Dalai Lama reached out to a source Hollywood had used to plumb the workings of the human psyche.

Specifically, he commissioned his good friend Paul Ekman — a psychologist who helped advise the creators of Pixar’s “Inside Out,” an animated film set inside a girl’s head — to map out the range of human sentiments. Dr. Ekman later distilled them into the five basic emotions depicted in the movie, from anger to enjoyment.

Dr. Ekman’s daughter, Eve, also a psychologist, worked on the project as well, with the goal of producing an interactive guide to human emotions that anyone with an Internet connection could study in a quest for self-understanding, calm and constructive action.

“We have, by nature or biologically, this destructive emotion, also constructive emotion,” the Dalai Lama said. “This innerness, people should pay more attention to, from kindergarten level up to university level. This is not just for knowledge, but in order to create a happy human being. Happy family, happy community and, finally, happy humanity.”

The Dalai Lama paid Dr. Ekman at least $750,000 to develop the project, which began with a request several years ago.

Dr. Ekman recalled the Dalai Lama telling him: “When we wanted to get to the New World, we needed a map. So make a map of emotions so we can get to a calm state.”

As a first step, Dr. Ekman conducted a survey of 149 scientists (emotion scientists, neuroscientists and psychologists who are published leaders in their fields) to see where there was consensus about the nature of emotions, the moods or states they produce, and related areas.

Based on the survey, Dr. Ekman concluded that there were five broad categories of emotions — anger, fear, disgust, sadness and enjoyment — and that each had an elaborate subset of emotional states, triggers, actions and moods. He took these findings to a cartography and data visualization firm, Stamen, to depict them in a visual and, he hoped, useful way.

“If it isn’t fun, it’s a failure,” Dr. Ekman said. “It’s got to be fun for people to use.”

Photo

A diagram from the Atlas of Emotions. Credit Paul Ekman

Stamen’s founder, Eric Rodenbeck, has created data visualizations for Google, Facebook and MTV, as well as maps showing climate change and rising oceans. But he said the Atlas was the most challenging project he had worked on because it was “built around knowledge and wisdom rather than data.”

Not surprisingly, getting scientists to reach a unified understanding of human emotions was difficult.

Dacher Keltner, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, also counseled Pixar on establishing and depicting the emotional characters for “Inside Out.” He has even advised Facebook on emoticons.

Although Dr. Keltner took part in Dr. Ekman’s survey, the two are not in complete agreement on the number of core emotions. Still, Dr. Keltner said he saw the project as a good step.

“The survey questions could have allowed for more gray areas,” he said. “But it’s important to take stock of what the scientific consensus is in the field.”

Dr. Ekman emphasized that the Atlas was not a scientific work intended for peer review.

“It is a visualization for what we think has been learned from scientific studies,” he said. “It’s a transformative process, a work of explanation.”

The Dalai Lama wants to keep religion out of it.

“If we see this research work as relying on religious belief or tradition, then it automatically becomes limited,” he said. “Even if you pray to God, pray to Buddha, emotionally, very nice, very good. But every problem, we have created. So I think even God or Buddha cannot do much.”

The Dalai Lama said he hoped the Atlas could be a tool for cultivating good in the world by defeating the bad within us.

“Ultimately, our emotion is the real troublemaker,” he said. “We have to know the nature of that enemy.”

Read More…

Reference:
New York Times. Inner Peace? The Dalai Lama Made a Website for That
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/07/world/dalai-lama-website-atlas-of-emotions.html?_r=0 Retrieved on May 6, 2016.