Indigenous rights

B.C. First Nation writes its own declaration of title rights and strategy

Posted on

B.C. First Nation writes its own declaration of title rights and strategy

THE CANADIAN PRESS OCTOBER 28, 2015
A First Nation on British Columbia’s central coast is not waiting for the provincial and federal governments to draft a reconciliation agreement. The Heiltsuk Nation has written and signed its own declaration, setting out what it says is a new mandate for a relationship within Canada.
BELLA BELLA – A First Nation on British Columbia’s central coast is not waiting for the provincial and federal governments to draft a reconciliation agreement.

The Heiltsuk Nation has written and signed its own declaration, setting out what it says is a new mandate for a relationship within Canada.

Hereditary Chief Harvey Humchitt says the First Nation has been collaborating with industry and senior governments on planning and economic opportunities, but without much progress on resource management decisions within its territories.

Chief Marilyn Slett says existing agreements will be honoured but the new approach will build a government-to-government relationship between the Heiltsuk, B.C., and Canada.

The First Nation relies on the Supreme Court of Canada’s 2014 Tsilhqot’in decision, that it says found a declaration of aboriginal title could be obtained through a negotiated agreement, or by court declaration.

Heiltsuk hereditary chiefs and elected leaders say as the sovereign authority over more than 35,000 square kilometres of the central coast, the First Nation has the right to control, manage and benefit from territorial resources.

© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Sun

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/first+nation+writes+declaration+title+rights+strategy/11474798/story.html#ixzz3q7YrYLXd

Opening Reception and Panel Discussion: “Thunder in Our Voices” Exhibition, 7 pm, Oct. 2, 2015

Posted on Updated on

 Friday, October 2: Opening Reception and Panel Discussion: “Thunder in Our Voices” Exhibition
In the 1970s, a consortium of oil companies proposed the largest pipeline project in North America. Elders and youth from 30 Dene and Invialuit villages stopped the project. How did they do it? ‘With the thunder in their voices.’

Join the Amelia Douglas Gallery on October 2 as they host the opening reception of Thunder in Our Voices, an exhibition (Sept 17 to Oct 23) of contemporary portraits from the Berger inquiry by Linda MacCannell. A panel discussion during the event with feature FNIS Assistant Professor Dr. Glen Coulthard alongside UVic’s Dr. Michael Asch and Peter Stephenson, as well as Drew Ann Wake.

Reception at 7:00 PM
Laura C. Muir Performing Arts Theatre, Amelia Douglas Gallery
700 Royal Avenue, New Westminster

Registration required.

Source: The Talking Stick: News and Information from the First Nations Longhouse, September 15, 2015

Soon-to-be lawyer wins right to wear regalia when she is called to the bar

Posted on

Photo: Christina Gray with permission

Christina Gray will set a strong precedent when she is called to the bar this week.

In a sea of black barristers’ robes at Toronto’s Roy Thomson Hall, Gray, a proud member of the Lax Kw’alaams Tsimshian, will be wearing her woollen black and red Tsimshian button blanket and her cedar hat. On her back there will be a hand-sewn killer whale, representing her clan.

The regalia represents her Tsimshian culture, laws, ways of being and history, said Gray.

Gray will be the first in Ontario to wear First Nations regalia instead of the traditional barristers’ robes when called to the bar on Tuesday.

In May, an initial request from Gray to the Law Society of Upper Canada to wear her traditional regalia for the ceremony was rejected on the grounds that the clothing worn at the call should be appropriate for court, and that regalia would cover the traditional barristers’ robes. Gray was invited to speak to the issue if she had further questions.

A month later, while watching the closing ceremony in Ottawa for the release of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s report on the residential school experience, she drafted a formal letter to the society, said Gray. Read More…

Source: http://rabble.ca/news/2015/06/soon-to-be-lawyer-wins-right-to-wear-regalia-when-she-called-to-bar?utm_content=bufferde656&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer#.VYh3aoAH340.facebook

Along with statements of support from her community, Gray sent the letter on June 5 and after a few meetings, the society honoured her request.

Hopi Nation and HARP File Lawsuit in France to Stop Future Sales of Sacred Objects

Posted on Updated on

Hopi Tribe and HARP File Lawsuit in France to Stop Future Sales of Sacred Objects

Herman Honanie

WASHINGTON — The Hopi Tribal Council and the Holocaust Art Restitution Project (HARP) filed a lawsuit in France to appeal a recent decision by the French “Conseil des Ventes” (“Board of Auction Sales”), an administrative body in charge of regulating and supervising auction sales on the French market.

The announcement of the lawsuit filing was made jointly by Herman G. Honanie, chairman of the Hopi Tribe and Ori Z. Soltes, of HARP.

Although the Conseil has the administrative power to suspend sales, it refused to suspend a December 15, 2014 auction sale of sacred “kwaa tsi” owned by the Hopi tribe, the Conseil allowed the sale to proceed after a special hearing held in Paris on December 11, 2014, rejecting the arguments put forth by the Hopi Tribe and HARP that title had never vested with subsequent possessors due to the sacred nature of these objects. Read More…

http://nativenewsonline.net/currents/hopi-tribe-and-harp-file-lawsuit-in-france-to-stop-future-sales-of-sacred-objects/

Women and Youth Fight for Freedom of Expression in Guatemala

Posted on Updated on

Women and Youth Fight for Freedom of Expression in Guatemala
March 16, 2015
On February 25, 2015 the Guatemalan National Police and the Public Ministry once again raided two community radio stations, this time in Chichicastenango, Quiche, a popular tourist destination. Radio Swan Tinamit and Radio Ixmukane both serve important audiences in Chichicastenango. Radio Swan Tinamit is mostly staffed by youth, and the topics they cover include the rights of Indigenous Peoples, youth participation in leadership, and Indigenous traditions, among others. Radio Ixmukane is mostly staffed by women, as the radio was founded as part of and is housed by Asociacion de Mujeres Ixmukane (Ixmukane Womens’ Association). Radio Ixmukane focuses on women’s rights, education on domestic abuse, and reproductive rights.
 
Persecution against community radio stations is an all too-common occurrence in Guatemala, and increasingly has been on the rise over the last two months… Read more.

Maya Land Rights Case to be Heard in International Courts

Posted on Updated on

Maya Land Rights Case to be Heard in International Courts
March 26, 2015
The Maya people of Toledo are scheduled for a hearing to reaffirm their land rights case at the regional Caribbean Court of Justice in April of 2015, after almost a decade of back and forth in the national courts in Belize. Their claim to the land has been upheld twice in the Supreme Court, once in 2009 and again in 2013. The government of Belize continues to assert that the land title the Maya hold should not be considered native or Indigenous land title, but merely based on a long period of occupation. However Maya leaders are optimistic about the ruling: “We are of the belief that it is our unity, our long standing customary practices that has sustained us and our humble leadership that yet again we will achieve not only the favors of the court but the minds and hearts of many people. The struggle of the Maya is the struggle of all people,” announced Alfonso Cal, President of the assembly of traditional leaders, looking forward to the hearing… Read more.

 

Guided Tour at MOA: c̓əsnaʔəm, the city before the city, April 21, 7pm

Posted on

guided tour
c̓əsnaʔəm, the city before the city

April 21, 7pm

Join MOA, the Musqueam First Nation, and the Museum of Vancouver for a series of groundbreaking exhibitions that will connect Vancouverites with the living legacy of c̓əsnaʔəm, the ancient villages and burial sites upon which the city of Vancouver is built. Highlighting language, oral history, and the community’s recent actions to protect c̓əsnaʔəm, the exhibitions invite visitors to engage with the long and dynamic history of the land. MOA’s exhibit features 3D modelling of maps and artifacts, original videography, family-friendly interactivity, and soundscapes blending traditional and modern sounds.

On April 21 join Musqueam community members, Elders, artists, and activists as they share their knowledge and explore the themes in the MOA exhibition. The tour begins at 7pm and is free with admission.