Indigenous women

Job – Instructor(s) Canadian Aboriginal Policy and Aboriginal Women in Canada, at Langara College. Needed ASAP

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CONCURRENT JOB POSTING

(As per Article 10.2.3 of the Collective Agreement)

Department/Program:              Aboriginal Studies        

Description of Position:

The Aboriginal Studies department at Langara College is looking for a part-time instructor (or instructors) to teach ABST 1104 – Canadian Aboriginal Policy and ABST 1116 – Aboriginal Women in Canada in the fall of 2018 with the possibility of additional work in the Spring of 2019 (see https://langara.ca/programs-and-courses/courses/ABST). The Aboriginal Studies department offers first and second year university transfer courses. The successful candidate will also help facilitate ABST cultural seminars.

Required Qualifications:         

  • Master’s Degree in relevant field (Indigenous Studies, Women’s, Gender or International Studies is considered an asset; PhD Preferred).
  • Post-secondary teaching experience from an intersectional feminist scholarship, critical theory and community-based/participatory perspective (additional teaching experience considered an asset).
  • International and on/off reserve experience in Aboriginal community-based governance and policy analysis (additional work experience considered an asset).
  • A comprehensive understanding of the international, historical and contemporary policies affecting Aboriginal Peoples pre/post Canadian confederation including socio-economic determinants of health and the unique challenges facing Indigenous learners living on/off reserve.
  • Working knowledge of the tri-council statement policy statement involving respectful research involving the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples of Canada.
  • Experience designing and delivering lesson plans for intercultural classroom compositions.
  • Ability to work effectively in a team environment with faculty and staff.

Duties and Responsibilities:

  • Effectively use available class and seminar time and maintain appropriate office hours to ensure availability for student consultation.
  • Maintain collegial working relationships in a manner consistent with the 4Rs of respect, responsibility, relevance and reciprocity.
  • As appropriate, actively seek opportunities to integrate students and learning into on/off reserve organizations throughout British Columbia.
  • Be an authentic and active contributor to the Aboriginal Studies Department, the Faculty of Social Sciences, the Langara Faculty Association and the College.

o            Full time                                                X             Part-Time, Fraction (25%) of Full-Time

o            Regular                                                  X             Temporary

Length of appointment:           Sept 1, 2018 – Dec 31, 2018

Start Date:                               August, 2018

Salary Range:                          Salary placement is on Langara instructors’ salary scale in accordance with qualifications and experience

Employee Group:                    LF

Application Information:          To apply, please visit our website at http://www.langara.bc.ca and select “Employment Opportunities”

For further information regarding this opportunity, please contact Justin Wilson, Coordinator Aboriginal Studies Program at jwilson@langara.ca.

Deadline:                                 10 Days after postin

Competition Number:

Posted on: July 25, 2018

Distribution: Human Resources, L.F.A., Deans’ Office

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(Original template in Deans of Instruction Office)

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Morning Coffee and chat with Dr. Dustin Louie – Jan 11, 2017, 10:30-11:30 am

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You are invited to a SAGE morning coffee and chat with Indigenous scholar Dustin Louie, from the University of Calgary Faculty of Education.
Wednesday, January 11, 2017
10:30 to 11:30 am
Boardroom, First Nations Longhouse

 

It is a great chance to meet and chat about his work and maybe ask some questions about new scholar roles and responsibilities.

 

Following the coffee and chat, Dustin will be giving a talk at the Social Justice Institute in the Jack Bell Building on Indigenous girls and their over representation in sexual exploitation and sex trade. Please see attached poster.

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2 Native Women Elected to National Academy of Education

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henrietta-mann
Henrietta Mann, Tsetsehestaestse (Cheyenne), is one of 11 elected to the National

2 Native Women Elected to National Academy of Education

3/10/16

Dr. Henrietta Mann, Tsetsehestaestse (Cheyenne), and K. Tsianina Lomawaima (Mvskoke/Creek Nation) were recently elected to the National Academy of Education.

Mann is the now retired founding president of Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribal College, and Lomawaima is a professor of justice and social inquiry, and distinguished scholar of indigenous education at the Center for Indian Education at Arizona State University.

They were among 11 elected for membership by Dr. Michael Feuer, Dean of the Graduate School of Education and Human Development at George Washington University and President of the National Academy of Education (NAEd).

NAEd celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2015, and has 199 U.S. members and 11 foreign associates who are elected based on outstanding scholarship related to education.

“I was astonished to be elected to this body of esteemed educators, just as committed to education as any one of them, yet, in my own unique cultural-based way. As my daughter once described me, education has always represented the true north on my compass,” Mann told ICTMN. “I came from a people who valued education, which was nurtured in me, and became my joy as a teacher and later as a university professor. It was an educational journey from the home of a great-grandmother, who was a healer of horses for peoples who pursued bison across the northern and southern plains to a journey throughout the halls of learning in such places as the University of California, Berkeley; Graduate School of Education, Harvard University; University of Montana; Montana State University; and the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribal College located on the campus of Southwestern Oklahoma State University. What a fulfilling educational experience and contribution. Now, membership in the National Academy of Education—my heart sings.”

Mann was the first person to occupy the Katz Endowed Chair in Native American Studies at Montana State University, Bozeman, where she is Professor Emerita, but continues to serve as Special Assistant to the President.

In 1991, Mann was named by Rolling Stone as one of the 10 leading professors in the nation, and in 2008, she received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Indian Education Association.

The College Board, Native American Student Advocacy Institute presented Mann with its first Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013, and has since created the Dr. Henrietta Mann Leadership Award to acknowledge and thank leaders for their advocacy in improving lives within Native communities. In 2014, MONEY Magazine named her a MONEY Hero Award Winner, one of 50 Unsung Heroes/50 States, conferred for her extraordinary work with the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribal College in improving the financial well-being of others.

Lomawaima joined Arizona State University in January 2014. From 1994-2014 she served on the faculty of American Indian Studies at the University of Arizona, serving as head from 2005-2009. From 1988–1994, she was a member of the Anthropology & American Indian Studies faculty at the University of Washington.

K. Tsianina Lomawaima is one of 11 elected to the National Academy of Education.
K. Tsianina Lomawaima is one of 11 elected to the National Academy of Education.

Lomawaima has received numerous teaching honors, including the University of Washington’s Distinguished Teaching Award. She also served as 2012-2013 President of the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association/NAISA, which she helped found in 2007. She was also awarded the Western History Association Lifetime Achievement Award for American Indian History in 2010.

“It’s a tremendous honor… As someone who works in indigenous studies and as a historian it took me by surprise,” Lomawaima told ICTMN. “I’m amazed that it happened, and just deeply honored.”

The full list of those elected to the NAEd is below:

Ron Astor, University of Southern California

Joan L. Herman, National Center for Research

Glynda A. Hull, University of California, Berkeley

Deanna Kuhn, Teachers College, Columbia University

K. Tsianina Lomawaima, Arizona State University

Henrietta Mann, Cheyenne Arapaho Tribal College

Russell Rumberger, University of California, Santa Barbara

Anna Sfard, University of Haifa

Carola Suárez-Orozco, University of California, Los Angeles

William F. Tate IV, Washington University in St. Louis

“It is my pleasure to welcome these leaders who represent the rich diversity of fields that study education,” Feuer said.

 

Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/03/10/2-native-women-elected-national-academy-education-163697

6 Things You Can Do to Put Your Anger into Action for #BertaCaceres

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by Cultural Survival on March 10, 2016
The international community has been reeling after the gunning down of Indigenous Lenca activist Berta Caceres of Honduras, well known and loved around the world for her dedication and commitment to her community, their lands, and protecting the environment.  Last week on March 3th, Berta was assassinated in her home by a death squad, after years of documented threats and harassment by Honduran military and private security of the hydroelectric dam company DESA.  Here are six concrete actions you can take to fight back for Berta and multiply the work she was dedicated to.
1) Ask the FMO bank to withdraw investment from the Agua Zarca project.
Berta stood up to corporations and helped delay the construction of the Agua Zarca dam which, if built, would destroy her community’s land and the Gualcarque River in Honduras. The dam was delayed due to protests for so long that investors started pulling from the project. As a result, Berta became a target for corporate spying, intimidation, and ultimately murder, simply because money wasn’t being made.   This is why we are calling on the largest remaining investor of the dam, FMO (a Dutch Development bank) to join the Chinese investors Sinohydro and the International Finance Corporation in withdrawing financial support for this project immediately.
2) Call on Authorities to Protect Gustavo Castro Soto, murder witness and assassination target.
Gustavo Castro Soto, a Mexican human rights defender, environmental activist and long-time ally of Berta and COPINH, was also shot during the attack.  Gustavo is the sole witness of the murder, and is currently being held against his will by Honduran authorities. In a note to some friends on March 6, Gustavo wrote, “The death squads know that they did not kill me, and I am certain that they want to accomplish their task.” Take action to ensure his safety by calling on Honduran, Mexican and embassy authorities demanding security for Gustavo, and to halt the criminalization against COPINH.
3) Call on the U.S. Department of State to take concrete steps
Berta was a vocal opponent of US backed 2009 presidential coup in Honduras. COPINH denounced the coup d’état as an instrument of violence serving transnational corporations to exploit resources and to repress the dissent of social movements. She also opposed continuing US military bases on Lenca territory.  The United States played has played a major role in legitimizing the 2009 coup and funding the right wing military government that has formed since.  In 2011 Washington authorized $1.3 billion for U.S. military electronics in Honduras,  and U.S. military expenditures for Honduras have gone up every year since 2009. Yet in the years since the coup, human rights violations in Honduras have increased at an alarming rate: roughly 150 environmental and human rights defenders have been killed.  Berta was a strong opponent of US military presence in Honduras. The Department of State and the US ambassador to Honduras have issued statements of condolences to Berta Caceres family and condemning her death, but stop short of describing concrete steps being taken to address the underlying issues prompting her assassination.
Write to the US state department demanding the following:
Pressure Honduran authorities to ensure the security and prompt release of Gustavo Castro.
Support COPINH’s demands that the Honduran state sign an agreement with the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) to send independent experts to conduct a clean, impartial, and transparent investigation.
Ensure that no US aid goes to military units repressing the Lenca people of Rio Blanco and encourage the Honduran government to withdraw the military from the zone.

4) Ask Congress to Suspend Funding for the Alliance for Prosperity
Berta was a vocal opponent against the Alliance for Prosperity, a plan for US funding to Central America was recently approved by US congress to  provide $750 million in military financing and training million to Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador, as well as to facilitate investment in extractive industries, including a massive gas pipeline from Mexico to Central America. But preconditions for percent of the total funds mean that countries will have to prove they are working to reduce migration and human trafficking, combat government corruption, and decrease poverty—just some items among a considerable list. The U.S. State Department and Agency for International Development, which are jointly in charge of administrating the money, will have to report to Congress by September 30 2016 on whether sufficient progress has been made, and if not, funding can be suspended.

5) Keep the pressure on through social media.
Tweet US and Honduran officials:
@USAmbHonduras
@StateDept
@JohnKerry
@BarackObama
@MP_Honduras
@JuanOrlandoH

6)  Spread the word
Share this list with family, friends, and networks, as well as the following statements from Berta’s family and colleagues:
Statement from the daughters, son, and mother of Berta Cáceres
Urgent denunciation by COPINH

Cultural Survival
2067 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02140

Book Launch – Dr. Shauna Butterwick, Dr. Michelle Stack & Dr. Alison Taylor – Mar 23, 4-6pm

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Book Launch
Dr. Shauna Butterwick, Dr. Michelle Stack & Dr. Alison Taylor

Wednesday, March 23rd, 4:00-6:00pm
Ponderosa Commons Multipurpose Room (PCOM 2012)

Table of Contents:

http://new.thompsonbooks.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/TableofContents.pdf

​Please note chapter 9: Weaving Indigenous women’s leadership: Pedagogies, protocols & practices​ by Dr. Alannah Young Leon.

Hope you can make it to the new Ponderosa Commons space!

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Lorimer Shenher, International Women’s Day Celebration: “Yes it’s 2016 and there is still work to be done.” 11:30am–1pm, March 4, 2016

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Please join MP Joyce Murray to celebrate International Women’s Day this year with special guest Lorimer Shenher (aka Lori) Yes it’s 2016 and there is still work to be done.” Lorimer is the amazing police detective who worked for years to secure resources and support to solve the Pickton murders case; years during which more women from Vancouver’s DTES were victimized. He later wrote a book chronicling his experience and deep frustration called That Lonely Section of Hell: The Botched Investigation of a Serial Killer Who Almost Got Away.
In 2015, Lorimer began a gender transition to male. He continues to write and is currently pursuing an MA in Professional Communications at Royal Roads University. His thesis project will be an audio documentary exploring the rise of the missing and murdered indigenous women as a major issue in the 2015 Canadian Federal Election.
Let’s celebrate women’s equality successes achieved, and explore barriers that remain for women, especially disadvantaged women and girls.
 
When: Friday March 4, 2016 from 11:30 – 1:00 pm
Where: MP Joyce Murray Constituency Office. 206 – 2112 W Broadway (at Arbutus) View map 
(Lunch will be provided – please come 10 minutes early to load your plate!)
 
Please RSVP to Joyce.murray.c1@parl.gc.ca asap!
 
Feel free to share this with your network.

Lecture by Aboriginal Scholar Dr. Sarah Hunt at GRSJ UBC, Nov. 4, 2015, 12-1pm

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Lecture by Aboriginal Scholar Dr. Sarah Hunt at GRSJ UBC

On Wednesday, November 4th from 12-1pm will be Lecture by Dr. Sarah Hunt titled ‘Embodying Self-Determination: resisting violence’. In this talk, Sarah will argue that the erasure of trans and Two-Spirit people is an ongoing form of violence which is integrally connected to the violent manifestations of colonial heteropatriarchy in the lives of Indigenous women and girls. Across these sites and scales of gendered epistemic and material violence, Sarah will discuss the decolonial imperative to advance Indigenous gender-based analyses that foster the agency and self-determination of all our relations.

Where: the Liu Institute Multipurpose room. Lunch will be provided with an RSVP! However folks are welcome to attend even without an RSVP.

More information and RSVPs can be found at the link below: http://grsj.arts.ubc.ca/events/

Reference: Office of Graduate Programs and Research. NewsFlash #737, October 30, 2015

 

Folks are also encouraged to check out our Facebook Page at: https://www.facebook.com/Social-Justice-Institute-UBC-Events-512911055409313/timeline/

And tweet to @GRSJInstitute