Indigenous women

Coyote Keyboard Workshop by Dr. Jo-Ann Archibald, Nov 4, 2015, 12-1:30 pm

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Coyote's Keyboard - Dr. Archibald

Dr. Jo-ann Archibald, Q’um Q’um Xiiem, is Sto:lo and St’at’imc, Associate Dean for Indigenous Education, NITEP Director, and Professor in Educational Studies. She will share her scholarly writing experiences and guidance that she received from Indigenous Elders, storytellers, and Tricksters such as Coyote about Indigenous stories. In this session, she and those who attend will have an opportunity to share their approaches, concerns, and successes about the ways that Indigenous stories can shape our writing so that we address the heart, mind, body, and spirit in our scholarship. Dr. Archibald is the author of “Indigenous Storywork: Educating the Heart, Mind, Body, and Spirit” published by UBC Press in 2008.

The Coyote’s Keyboard Writing Series emphasizes ways of presenting and writing Indigenous scholarship. All are welcome to attend these sessions.

Coyote’s Keyboard – Dr. Archibald

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$1M Fund To Open Doors For Aboriginal Women Studying Business

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$1M FUND TO OPEN DOORS FOR ABORIGINAL WOMEN STUDYING BUSINESS
By Public Affairs on September 23, 2015

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Students studying in the Ch’nook Indigenous Business Education initiative program

September 22, 2015 – A $1-million gift from the family of Warren and Maureen Spitz will fund a new awards program at UBC’s Sauder School of Business benefiting Aboriginal women pursuing business studies. The Spitz Fellows Program was created in collaboration with the philanthropic Toronto-based family and accepted its first student this month.

“Our hope is that the Spitz Fellows Program will create opportunities for women to empower themselves and succeed in their educational, career and life goals,” said Warren Spitz, president and CEO, UCS Forest Group. “Our aim is to provide the support recipients need to invest fully in their studies and become leaders at Sauder and beyond.

With the aim of eliminating financial barriers to success, the program provides up to two Spitz Family Awards for Aboriginal Women annually, with each recipient eligible to receive $10,000 per academic year during a bachelor of commerce program and additional funds as necessary.

Spitz Fellows will be invited to play an active role at Sauder in the Ch’nook Indigenous Business Education initiative, a program focused on promoting business education in Aboriginal communities. As Ch’nook Scholars, they will help encourage business education among Aboriginal high school students, attend networking events and conferences with fellow Aboriginal business students across British Columbia, and gain access to valuable internship opportunities created through the program.

“At Sauder, we firmly believe that business education can be used as a powerful tool to transform lives and strengthen communities,” said Sauder’s Dean Robert Helsley, Grosvenor Professor of Cities, Business Economics and Public Policy. “We’re thankful the Spitz family shares this vision and greatly appreciate their generous support and partnership in developing this initiative.”

The gift to support the creation of the Spitz Fellows Program is part of UBC’s start an evolution campaign, the largest fundraising and alumni engagement campaign in Canadian history.

“At UBC we feel it’s vital to ensure that our students have the support they need to excel in their academic lives and beyond,” said Martha Piper, interim president. “We greatly appreciate the generosity of the Spitz family and thank them for helping to create this new pathway for Aboriginal women at UBC to reach their full potential.” Read More…

Continue on the path towards health and reconciliation: Indigenous Health Conference 2016

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May 26-27, 2016  |  Hilton Meadowvale, Mississauga ON

Continue on the path towards health and reconciliation
In 2014, the inaugural Indigenous Health Conference was a call to action for health equity for Indigenous peoples in Canada. The conference was the first of its kind in Canada and attracted enormous media attention including the Globe and Mail, CBC radio and Metro Morning.

Building upon this success, the 2nd biennial
Indigenous Health Conference will continue the dialogue and focus on the determinants of health and reconciliation. Sessions will discuss working towards reconciliation, major health issues for Indigenous peoples in Canada and also potential solutions to address them.

The conference is led by
Dr. Anna Banerji, a member of the Order of Ontario and an advocate for Indigenous women and children.

Please join us again to continue on the path towards health and reconciliation.

Muskogee Creek Joy Harjo Wins Wallace Stevens Poetry Prize

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MUSKOGEE CREEK JOY HARJO WINS $100,000 POETRY PRIZE BY LEVI RICKERT / CURRENTS / 12 SEP 2015

Joy-Harjo-photo-credit-Karen-Kuehn
Joy Harjo (Photo by Karen Kuehn)
Published September 12, 2015

NEW YORK — American Indian poet and activist Joy Harjo (Muskogee Creek) has been selected to receive the Wallace Stevens Award for “proven mastery” by the Academy of American Poets. The award was announced on Thursday, September 10, 2015. With the award comes a $100,000 stipend.

The prestigious Wallace Stevens Award is given annually “to recognize outstanding and proven mastery in the art of poetry” for lifetime achievement. No applications are accepted; recipients are chosen by the Academy of American Poets Board of Chancellors.

“Throughout her extraordinary career as poet, storyteller, musician, memoirist, playwright and activist, Joy Harjo has worked to expand our American language, culture, and soul,” stated Academy of American Poets Chancellor Alicia Ostiker. “

“HARJO IS ROOTED SIMULTANEOUSLY IN THE NATURAL WORLD, IN EARTH—ESPECIALLY THE LANDSCAPE OF THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST— AND IN THE SPIRIT WORLD. AIDED BY THESE REDEMPTIVE FORCES OF NATURE AND SPIRIT, INCORPORATING NATIVE TRADITIONS OF PRAYER AND MYTH INTO A POWERFULLY CONTEMPORARY IDIOM,  HER VISIONARY JUSTICE-SEEKING ART TRANSFORMS PERSONAL AND COLLECTIVE BITTERNESS TO BEAUTY, FRAGMENTATION TO WHOLENESS, AND TRAUMA TO HEALING,” CONTINUED OSTIKER.

Born in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Harjo, 64, received a BA degree from the University of New Mexico before earning an MFA from the Iowa Writers Workshop in 1978.

Her books of poetry include How We Became Human: New and Selected Poems (W.W. Norton & Co., 2002); A Map to the Next World: Poems (W.W. Norton & Co., 2000); The Woman Who Fell From the Sky (W.W. Norton & Co., 1994), which received the Oklahoma Book Arts Award; In Mad Love and War (Wesleyan University Press, 1990), which received an American Book Award and the Delmore Schwartz Memorial Award; Secrets from the Center of the World (University of Arizona Press, 1989); She Had Some Horses (Thunder’s Mouth Press, 1983); and What Moon Drove Me to This? (Reed Books,1979). She has also written a memoir, Crazy Brave (W. W. Norton & Co., 2012), which describes her journey to becoming a poet, and which won the 2013 PEN Center USA literary prize for creative nonfiction.

Also a performer, Harjo has appeared on HBO’s Def Poetry Jam in venues across the U.S. and internationally. She plays saxophone with her band Poetic Justice, and has released four award-winning CD’s of original music. In 2009, she won a Native American Music Award (NAMMY) for Best Female Artist of the Year.

Harjo’s other honors include the PEN Open Book Award, the American Indian Distinguished Achievement in the Arts Award, the Josephine Miles Poetry Award, the Mountains and Plains Booksellers Award, the William Carlos Williams Award from the Poetry Society of America, and fellowships from the Arizona Commission on the Arts, the Witter Bynner Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Most recently, she received the 2015 Wallace Stevens Award for proven mastery in the art of poetry by the Academy of American Poets. About Harjo, said: Harjo is Professor of English and American Indian Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She lives in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

First Nations Cree Ashley Callingbull Named MRS Universe 2015

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Ashley Callingbull, a members of Cree First Nations, has been crowned MRS Universe 2015 in Minsk, Belarus. Mrs. Callingbull represented Canada in the pageant on the other side of the globe.

Ms. Callingbull posted on Facebook the following message: I’m so proud to say I am now the new MRS Universe 2015 !!! I am the first First Nations woman to win this title! I am also the first Canadian Delegate to win as well!! Sooooooo happy right now!”

MRS Universe 2015 – Mrs Canada 1st Runner up – Mrs South Africa 2nd Runner up – Mrs Ukraine 3rd Runner up – Mrs Costa rica 4th Runner up – Mrs Gibraltar

As a veteran pageant participant who rated highly in Miss Universe Canada and Miss World Canada competitions, Callingbull was undoubtedly one of the favorites among the delegates convened in Minsk.

Ashley Callingbull is a 23 year old Cree First Nations woman from the Enoch Cree Nation in the province of Alberta. She is currently enrolled at the Northern Alberta Institute of Technology in the Television Program. She is very devoted to her culture and people, and takes pride in her Native Cree heritage, and has shown this through her volunteer work with community elders and aboriginal youth. By the time Ashley reached 10 years old; she had consecutively won all Enoch’s princess crowns. She is a professionally trained dancer in tap, ballet, jazz, pointe and performed in the Nutcracker.

Original Article: http://www.whitewolfpack.com/2015/08/first-nations-cree-ashley-callingbull.html

Women and Youth Fight for Freedom of Expression in Guatemala

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Women and Youth Fight for Freedom of Expression in Guatemala
March 16, 2015
On February 25, 2015 the Guatemalan National Police and the Public Ministry once again raided two community radio stations, this time in Chichicastenango, Quiche, a popular tourist destination. Radio Swan Tinamit and Radio Ixmukane both serve important audiences in Chichicastenango. Radio Swan Tinamit is mostly staffed by youth, and the topics they cover include the rights of Indigenous Peoples, youth participation in leadership, and Indigenous traditions, among others. Radio Ixmukane is mostly staffed by women, as the radio was founded as part of and is housed by Asociacion de Mujeres Ixmukane (Ixmukane Womens’ Association). Radio Ixmukane focuses on women’s rights, education on domestic abuse, and reproductive rights.
 
Persecution against community radio stations is an all too-common occurrence in Guatemala, and increasingly has been on the rise over the last two months… Read more.

Guardians of life: The indigenous women fighting oil exploitation in the Amazon

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On Oct. 12, 2013, a group of nearly 300 women from seven indigenous nationalitiesmarched to Quito, Ecuador, arriving in the capital four days later with theirchildren in their arms, the sharp angles of their faces — young and old — decoratedwith vegetable ink designs, covered in the same strength and determination with which they began their journey. They were marching to Quito to ask the central government to respect their ancestral lands, to refrain from exploiting the oil that lies beneath his Kawsak Sacha, a living jungle. In November of that same year, a smaller delegation of women peacefully protested during the 11th Oil Licensing Round, an auction of 6 million acres of ancestral indigenous land for oil exploitation. The protests, however, turned sour when oil executive and politicians scolded protesters, and Ecuadoran President Rafael Correa subsequently demanded the closing of the NGO Fundación Pachamama and indicted 10 indigenous leaders on charges of terrorism.

While women have always played an active role in historic marches that marked the struggle for the rights of indigenous peoples in Ecuadorthis was the first walkorganized and led by women.

Felipe Jacome’s set of photos AmazonGuardians of Life documents the strugglesof indigenous women defending the Ecuadoran Amazon through portraitscombined with the powerful written testimonies. The words across each photograph are a self-reflection of the lives of women, their culture, history and traditions, and especially about the reasons for fighting oil drilling on their ancestral landsThe color designs framing each portrait use the same natural dyes found in face paint to expand on the symbols and designs that reflect theirpersonalities, courage and struggle.

All photos by Felipe Jacome Read More