Indigenous youth

Job – Program Coordinator, Get Outside BC for Youth in Care, P/T Position. Due: Feb 13, 2017 –

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Program Coordinator – Get Outside BC for Youth in Care

Program Coordinator – Get Outside BC for Youth in Care
Part-Time Contract Position

Are you passionate about protecting B.C.’s ocean and wilderness and keeping B.C.’s public land and water wild forever? Are you excited by the opportunities and challenges that come with working in a complicated social and political landscape with a myriad of views on the best solutions?

CPAWS-BC is seeking a dynamic Program Coordinator to lead the creation of a new a CPAWS-BC program, Get Outside BC for Youth in Care. Based at the CPAWS-BC office in Vancouver, the Program Coordinator will be responsible for coordinating and executing all aspects of the Get Outside BC for Youth In Care Program. The Program Coordinator ensures the smooth delivery of the program objectives and positive participant experience while maintaining partner relationships and administrating the day to day project tasks. The Program Coordinator will work closely with the Executive Director and Community Engagement Coordinator.
The Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, BC Chapter (CPAWS-BC) is one of Canada’s oldest non-profit conservation groups. We protect wilderness in every corner of BC and deep into the ocean. We have been protecting BC’s nature since 1978 and are dedicated to keeping BC’s public land and water wild forever. We need help protecting wilderness in every corner of B.C. and deep into the ocean. Is that you?
CPAWS-BC’s hiring practices give priority to Aboriginal people and people who face barriers to employment. We encourage applications from former youth in the foster care system and Indigenous people living in BC.
Key Responsibilities:

Community Engagement

  • Build, manage and maintain relationships with program partners to further program objectives;
  • Coordinate all aspects of the Get Outside BC for Youth in Care program, including assisting youth participants with problem solving and planning, as well as evaluating and reporting on the program;
  • Recruit youth in or who have transitioned out of the foster care system to join the Youth Advisory Committee;
  • Coordinate and complete administrative tasks relating to program activities;
  • Facilitate Youth Advisory Committee meetings, workshops, and presentations in both indoor and outdoor settings;
  • Lead outdoor activities (e.g. hiking, snowshoeing, canoeing, etc.)
  • Create and implement the Get Outside BC for Youth in Care program using feedback from the Youth Advisory Committee and social service organization;
  • Track expenditures and manage program budget; and
  • Serve as an ambassador for the organization, leaving all with a positive perception if the organization and its staff.

Monitoring and Evaluation

  • Ensure the Get Outside BC for Youth in Care program has a clear strategy, deliverables, and assessment tools (to measure success); and
  • Regularly report back on program using reliable metrics and evaluation tools.

Core Requirements/ Competencies:

  • Problem solver and solutions based thinker, who is able to demonstrate a passion for community engagement
  • Must have a strong understanding of privilege and oppression and how it impacts community engagement/community work in the context of youth in the foster care system
  • Experience in planning and program management, including goal setting, determining strategies to move a program forward, create and implement action plans, manage budgets, and monitor and evaluate programs in order to report on deliverables
  • Flexibility/ adaptability. Tolerant of a constantly changing work environment and adjust quickly to changing priorities and conditions
  • Experience facilitating workshops for youth and adults
  • Experience leading outdoor activities
  • Community organizing

 

Qualifications:

  • 2 years experience working with vulnerable populations or at-risk-youth in an outdoor setting
  • Experience in the fields of environmental stewardship, environmental education, and curriculum development is considered an asset
  • Experience with Microsoft Office suite
  • A valid class 5 (or higher) driver’s licence without restrictions
  • A clear criminal record with respect to working with youth and vulnerable populations (the actual criminal check will be done using our system after the interview – do not do in advance)
  • Ability to work in Canada, without restrictions

Additional Asset Criteria:

  • Lived experience with the Foster Care system
  • Additional fluency in languages other than English
  • Experience working in the NGO/ENGO sector
  • A passion for conservation work
  • An ability to work in a fast paced, high distraction environment
  • Being extremely well organized

Note: This position may include working with vulnerable people and therefore a successful Criminal Records Check will be required. CPAWS-BC will conduct the records check for the successful candidate. Please do not apply for a Criminal Records Check in advance of being offered the position as CPAWS-BC has a specific system that we are required to use.

Location and working environment: This is a six month part-time, 20 hours per week, contract position at CPAWS-BC’s downtown Vancouver office. Our work environment appeals to self-directed, flexible team players who have excellent interpersonal skills. Our office is close to multiple transit options and we have an open, hard-working, fun, and creative team environment.

Compensation: Compensation starts at $20 per hour and increases on a scale commensurate with the experience of the successful candidate.

Preferred start date: Late February or Early March, 2017

 

Application Process

Applications: Please send a cover letter and resume with the subject line: “Program Coordinator Position” to the attention of the CPAWS-BC Hiring Committee at hiring@cpawsbc.org. No phone calls or inquiries please.

Please ensure that your cover letter indicates how you meet the CPAWS-BC’s Core Requirements and Qualifications, as well as how your past experience will make you successful with this position’s Key Responsibilities.

Deadline: 13 February 2017, at 11:59pm

Please note that we will not be able to respond to applicants until after the deadline, with the exception of an auto-response that you will receive immediately to indicate that your application has been received.

For more information on CPAWS-BC visit our website at www.cpawsbc.org and sign-up on our mailing list, or connect with us on Twitter and Facebook: cpawsbc

Jobs – Summer Science Program, UBC. Due: Mar 31, 2016

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There are several jobs with various duties and capacities available for the Aboriginal summer science camp at UBC over the summer. The job postings have been made available and we are now accepting applications for positions. The deadline to apply is March.31.

Here is a little bit about the summer science program:
This is a one-week cultural, health and science program for Aboriginal students in grades 8-11.
The program promotes interest in health and science programs through firsthand experience at the University of British Columbia.
Great opportunities to meet new friends, eat great food, connect with Elders and role models, and enjoy fun, laughter and learning.
Here is the link for the webpage and job postings.
http://aboriginal-health.sites.olt.ubc.ca/education/ubc-summer-science-program/?preview_id=1168&preview_nonce=b3ecc7a600&preview=true

article: The invisible crisis killing Native American youth

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By Troy A. Eid 

Guest Commentary

POSTED:   01/30/2014 05:37:39 PM MST3 COMMENTS| UPDATED:   ABOUT A MONTH AGO

 

Nearly two dozen military veterans kill themselves every day in the United States, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs. Post-traumatic stress disorder is often to blame.

President Obama has rightly demanded better care for returning vets who suffer from PTSD. He recently invited Wayne Telford — father of U.S. Air Force Sgt. Brooke Caffrey of Grand Junction, who committed suicide in 2012 after her fourth tour of duty — to attend the State of the Union address.

Yet there’s another massive PTSD tragedy in Colorado and across our country. It generates virtually zero public attention because it concerns what may be the most vulnerable group of our citizens: Native Americans and Alaska Natives. Because they’re exposed so frequently to violent crime, an astonishing one in four Native American juveniles currently suffers from PTSD.

Read more: The invisible crisis killing Native American youth – The Denver Post
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