Indigenous

Recruiting workshop and cast members for šxʷʔamət (home)

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workshop and cast members for šxʷʔamət (home) – no acting experience required
Theatre for Living is collaborating with Journey’s Around the Circle Society on our next Mainstage production in 2017, šxʷʔamət (home).  After all the proclamations, apologies, and policies from the government to address Reconciliation with indigenous people in Canada…what does Reconciliation look and feel like on the ground?  Is it just another form of assimilation? How do we ensure it is honourable?
The project will be created and performed by Indigenous and non-indigenous people living the issues, and will be directed by David Diamond, and Associate Director Renae Morriseau.  All participants and cast are paid a living wage – no acting experience is required.  The only requirement is lived experiences in the journey towards Reconciliation.
Are you interested in contributing to the process by sharing your own journey towards Reconciliation? 
Apply now to be a part of šxʷʔamət (home)!
Workshop dates: Jan 30th – Feb 4th, 2017
Rehearsals: Feb 7th – 26th, 2017
Play: 11 performances, March 3 – 11th, 2017 (with a preview on March 2nd) at the Firehall Arts Centre.
To apply, email David Ng (outreach@theatreforliving.com) , Theatre for Living’s Outreach Coordinator your application, contact information, and answers to to the two questions below:
We want real diversity in the room, so tell us who you are, and anything else you want us to know about you!
What is your journey towards reconciliation? What are the blockages that you think exist? Share with us your story, your lived experiences with Reconciliation, and what it means to you?
There is no right or wrong answer to these questions – we are looking for your own personal lived experiences and expertise.
Please share this email with any one you think might be interested in participating in šxʷʔamət (home).
For more information, please visit the link below:
or email our Outreach Coordinator, David Ng, at outreach@theatreforliving.com
or phone the office 604.871.0508
Please keep in mind that the work is physical work – meaning it uses the physical language of the theatre to engage with the issues we are investigating.  It does not involve verbal storytelling/testimonials, or flipcharts J

 

 

David Ng
Outreach Coordinator
Theatre for Living (Headlines Theatre)

323 – 350 East 2nd Avenue (buzzer 2509)   |   Unceded Coast Salish Territories  |  Vancouver, BC Canada V5T 4R8
ph: 604.871.0508   |   toll free in Canada/US: 1.877.761.0508  |  
Find us on FACEBOOK  |  Twitter: @theatre4living  | Instagram: @theatre4living

 

Call for proposals- Concurrent sessions Canadian Association of Graduate Studies Annual Conference. Due: Apr 30, 2016

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Call for proposals- Concurrent sessions
 
CAGS invites submissions for concurrent sessions for the 2016 CAGS Annual Conference to be held at the Hyatt Regency in Toronto, November 2-4.  
 
All submissions should reflect this year’s conference theme:
 
Accessing graduate studies
 
We welcome proposals that touch on topics that address aboriginal issues; issues of disability; issues relating to financial and/or social challenges facing graduate students. Proponents are urged to develop panels providing a well-rounded discussion and practical advice if possible to the particular issue being addressed. A concurrent session lasts 75 minutes and should allow sufficient time for adequate discussion and exchange with participants. Student perspectives are welcomed.
 
Please provide a working session title, a description, and name(s) of proposed speaker(s). 
 
Please note that there is no monetary compensation awarded to speakers. CAGS can provide some audio-visual assistance for presentations.
 
Proposals will be accepted until April 30, 2016.
 
Forward proposals and contact information to lbenoit@cags.ca  using the title: “Concurrent session 2016”.

 

Funding – Aboriginal Graduate Fellowship, UBC

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Aboriginal Graduate Fellowship

The University of British Columbia offers multi-year fellowships to Master’s and doctoral Aboriginal students. Award winners are selected on the basis of academic merit through an annual competition, administered by the Faculty of Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies in consultation with the First Nations House of Learning. Approximately a dozen new fellowships are offered each year.

Amount: $16,175 – $18,200 per annum plus tuition

Deadline: G+PS deadline 12 February, 2016, applicants are to check with their graduate program for its internal deadline

Eligibility Summary

?         All Aboriginal students are eligible to apply, but priority is given to Aboriginal graduate students whose traditional territory falls, at least in part, within Canada.

?         Applicants may or may not be UBC graduate students at the time of application – the competition is open to both incoming and continuing graduate students.

Nomination Procedures / Materials

?         completed Aboriginal Graduate Fellowship Application Form

?         copy of applicant’s Canadian Common CV (use the CGS Master’s form, save as a pdf)

?         copies of all university-level transcripts to 31 Dec 2015 (print-out of Academic History from SISC is acceptable for UBC transcript).

For complete information about this competition, please see the Graduate Awards website: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/aboriginal-graduate-fellowships

Community Feast Bowl at FIrst Nations Longhouse, Nov. 25, 2015

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Wednesday, November 25: Community Feast Bowl

Join the Indigenous Health Garden for the monthly Community Feast Bowl Lunch, serving traditional and in-season foods. Volunteers are needed to help prepare food. Meet in the Longhouse kitchen any time after 9:30 AM to help cook. If you are new to the Feast Bowl, visit the volunteer website and let the organizers know you are coming or contact Hannah Lewis, including for more information.Wednesday, November 25, 9:30 AM – 1:30 PM
Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall, Longhouse

Lunch will be served at 12:30 PM in Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall. The meal is free and everyone is welcome.

Source: The Talking Stick: News and Information from the First Nations Longhouse, November 16, 2015

Tillikum Lens Photo Exhibition Opening

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Tillikum Lens Photo Exhibition Opening

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Take a walk in my shoes and see the world that I see.

Join us for a photo gallery opening hosted by Tillikum Lens, a program dedicated to empower indigenous youth through image making. Photos that will be displayed were all taken by youth, with the help of experienced instructors who work with local communities and organizations to promote diverse perspectives and cross-cultural understanding.

To learn more about Tillikum Lens, please read the outline.

People are drawn to different mediums for creative purposes. What we saw within our youth that took part in Tillikum Lens is they not only learned to be creative but began to witness the world around them and document it. For a young person who may not feel they have a place, or purpose in this world this is a massive realization, they became aware and, they belong to that moment. That moment they record has a story and now they are a part of it.” – Osoyoos Indian Band

Join us for an evening of creativity, stories and music celebrating indigenous youth.

Open to all ages. Light refreshments will be served.

Register for the event here.

Explore some of the photography: http://tillikumlens.com/

Co-sponsored by Sony Canada, the International Sustainability Education Foundation, the Osoyoos Indian Band and Lil’wat Nation, and the Squamish Nation, and the Liu Institute for Global Issues, UBC.

Location:
Liu Lobby Gallery
Address:
6476 North West Marine Drive

Course – EDCP 539 (032): Narrativity, Ecopedagogy and Indigeneity

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Dear Students you are invited to register in:
EDCP 539 (032):
Narrativity, Ecopedagogy and Indigeneity

Held in Panderosa Commons 1255 on Wednesdays, from 4:30 to 7:30 pm.

Professor:  Dr. Peter Cole
Office: Scarfe 2223
Email: peter.cole@ubc.ca

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COURSE DESCRIPTION & FORMAT

The power of narratives will be explored as they intersect with ecopedagogical and Indigenous knowings and practices toward a multi-storied, compassionate, just and ecologically sustainable world. Storying as an ‘Indigegogy’ has long served Indigenous Peoples worldwide as an educational and survival practice, engaging through sharing, siting and resituating, through forensic awareness training, opening oneself to the world. Ecopedagogy—learning to ‘read’ and navigate land, sky, water, words, how a raven flies, a fish swims, a tree sways, presence or not of insects, birds, moss, lichen, bark, fungus, berries, accustomed sounds, signs of presence or absence, freshness of tracks and traces, weather and predicative ‘meanings’ inscribed within storying—has always been key for Indigenous pedagogies. Not only the visual, but the auditory, olfactory, tactile, gustatory, and intuitional senses are important reading and transliterating agencies to connect, resituate, realign and regenerate.

Engaging with the course readings, videos, and seminar discussions will provide students the opportunity to make connections with ecopedagogical and Indigenous understandings and practices. A field trip will offer time and space to consider human, non-human and more-than-human worlds not simply as concepts, but as intra-actions of interdependency and reciprocity. Students will respond critically to the course readings and activities in written, oral and/or other means of their choosing as they create ecopedagogical narratives grounded in their own research interests, cultural knowings, histories, lived experiences, geographies and ecologies. This course is open to all interested students.

Course Poster: EDCP 539

Book Launch and Reading: Broken Man, at Vancouver Public Library, Nov. 14, 2015, 3-5pm

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HUMMINGBIRD DREAMS PRESS promotes Indigenous writers, artists, storytellers and translators. Our collections explore inter-culturality, bilingual editions, ethical financing and diverse forms of distribution. As cultural caretakers, we celebrate Indigenous world views, the reconstitution of cultural identities and the foregrounding of luminous contributions.