Inuit

New Issue of Canadian Journal of Education

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Canadian Journal of Education

Canadian Journal of Education/Revue canadienne de l’éducation has just published its latest issue [Vol 39, No 4 (2016)] at http://www.cje-rce.ca/index.php/cje-rce. We invite you to review the Table of Contents on our site and review articles and items of interest.

Editorial/Éditorial

Editorial | December 2016 PDF
Christopher DeLuca, Theodore M. Christou 1-3

Articles

Les enseignants issus de la diversité ethnoculturelle représentent-ils une valeur ajoutée pour la profession ? Résultats d’une étude menée en Suisse romande PDF (Français)
Stéphanie Bauer, Abdeljalil Akkari 1-25
Documenter les façons de faire d’enseignants de 6e année du primaire en mathématiques, en lecture et en écriture dans toutes les étapes de la démarche d’évaluation PDF (Français)
Lakshmee Devi Ramoo, Micheline-Joanne Durand 1-24
Revisiting the Challenges Linked to Parenting and Home–School Relationships at the High School Level PDF
Rollande Deslandes, Sylvie Barma 1-32
Développer le sens du métier pour favoriser le bienêtre en formation initiale à l’enseignement PDF (Français)
Nancy Goyette 1-29
Enseigner en milieu francophone minoritaire canadien: synthèse des connaissances sur les défis et leurs implications pour la formation des enseignants PDF (Français)
Martine Cavanagh, Laurent Cammarata, Sylvie Blain 1-32
From Cultural Deprivation to Individual Deficits: A Genealogy of Deficiency in Inuit Adult Education PDF
Scott McLean 1-28
Inclusion Reconceptualized: Pre-Service Teacher Education and Disability Studies in Education PDF
Chris Gilham, Joanne Tompkins 1-25
Étude de conditions didactiques favorables à la décontextualisation des connaissances mathématiques PDF (Français)
Virginie Houle 1-19
Lire des textes de fiction et des textes informatifs aux élèves du préscolaire et du primaire : analyse des interactions extratextuelles des enseignants PDF (Français)
Anne-Marie Dionne 1-28
Evolving Practices: Admissions Policies in Ontario Teacher Education Programs PDF
Michael Holden, Julian Kitchen 1-28

Book Reviews/Recensions d’ouvrages

Indigenous Business in Canada: Principles and Practices PDF
Melanie Nelson, Matthew Waugh 1-4
Self-Construction and Social Transformation: Lifelong, Lifewide and Life-deep Learning PDF
Carl Ruest 1-4
GRIT: The Power of Passion and Perseverance PDF
Richard Morehouse
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SSHERC’s New Guidelines for Merit Review of Aboriginal Research

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Purpose

SSHRC has developed these guidelines to ensure that the merit review of Aboriginal research upholds SSHRC’s principles for merit review. These guidelines are intended to supplement the SSHRC Manual for Adjudication Committee Members, but might also be used by applicants, external reviewers and the postsecondary institutions and partnering organizations that support Aboriginal research.

Context

Aboriginal research is defined under the Definitions of Terms on SSHRC’s website.

Since the early 2000s, SSHRC has promoted research by and with Aboriginal Peoples, having recognized its potential to increase knowledge and understanding about human thought and behaviour, past and present, and to help create a better future.

The Guidelines for the Merit Review of Aboriginal Research further ensure that Aboriginal research incorporating Aboriginal knowledge systems (including ontologies, epistemologies and methodologies) is recognized as a scholarly contribution and meets SSHRC’s standards of excellence. The guidelines are also designed to encourage that Aboriginal research be conducted with sensitivity, and only after consideration about who conducts the research and why and how it is conducted. The guidelines complement information contained in the second edition of the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (TCPS2), and, in particular, Chapter 9: Research Involving the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples of Canada.

These guidelines are relevant for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal researchers who conduct Aboriginal research.

Merit Review Measures in Place

For applications related to Aboriginal research, SSHRC ensures that:

  • external assessors, either Aboriginal or non-Aboriginal, have experience and expertise in Aboriginal research; and
  • when the volume of applications warrants it, adjudication committees are in part or entirely composed of members having community research experience and expertise in Aboriginal research.

SSHRC may solicit external assessments from experts in fields of inquiry relevant to the applications, to aid the adjudication committee in making its decisions.

Key Concepts for the Merit Review of Aboriginal Research

Indigenous or traditional knowledge, according to Chapter 9 of the TCPS2, “is usually described by Aboriginal Peoples as holistic, involving body, mind, feelings and spirit” (p.108). Indigenous knowledge is rarely acquired through written documents, but, rather, a worldview adopted through living, listening and learning in the ancestral languages and within the contexts of living on the land. Engagement with elders and other knowledge holders is acknowledged as valued and vital to knowledge transmission within the context of Aboriginal Peoples living in place. Both Aboriginal knowledge content and processes of knowledge transmission are, thus, embedded in the performance of living, including storytelling, ceremonies, living on the land, the use of natural resources and medicine plants, arts and crafts, singing and dancing, as well as engagement with the more than human world.

Reciprocity is considered an important value in Aboriginal ways of knowing, in that it emphasizes the mutuality of knowledge giving and receiving. In the context of research, and, more specifically, SSHRC’s evaluation criteria, the emphasis on a co-creation model should result in reciprocity in the form of partnerships and collaborative practices, which can include: identification of research objectives and methods; conduct of the research; ethical research protocols; data analysis and presentation; and transmission of knowledge. It also recognizes that access and benefits are, thus, integrally connected.

Community, in the context of Aboriginal research, can refer to places or land-based communities, as well as thematic communities and communities of practice. Furthermore, community-based, community-initiated and community-driven research can involve varying degrees of community engagement; the research outputs will be negotiated taking into account the interests of relevant Aboriginal community members.

Respect, relevance and contributions are important considerations in the merit review of Aboriginal research. Applications should demonstrate that the proposed research identifies and respects relevant community research protocols and current goals, as well as the contributions to and from the community that are likely to emerge or are in place. A respectful research relationship necessitates a deep level of collaboration and ethical engagement. This may include engaging with existing, distinctive research processes and protocols for conducting ethical research reviews in the community; learning within language and/or traditional knowledge systems; collaboratively rebuilding or revitalizing processes that have been displaced or replaced; and/or codeveloping new processes, based on the community’s expressed interests. Finally, this level of collaboration and engagement may also require additional, targeted consultative or review processes.

The following points are intended to assist committee members when reviewing Aboriginal research proposals.

Committee members evaluating research grant applications should use the following list of considerations in relation to the specific evaluation criteria used in assessing grant proposals (i.e., Challenge, Feasibility and Capability).

Committee members evaluating applications for fellowships and scholarships should use the following list of considerations in their review of proposed programs of study or programs of work, as well as in their general assessment of a candidate’s academic capability. While some of these considerations relate more strongly to aspects of SSHRC’s grants programming, they also offer relevant guidance for the review of proposals for doctoral and postdoctoral support.

1. Challenge—The aim and importance of the endeavour:

  • Given the emphasis placed on lived experience, both written and oral literature are appropriate forms of knowledge for consideration. Examples of oral literature can include interviews or personal encounters, or traditional teaching with elders.
  • Theoretical framework and methodology may be combined. For example, in storytelling, the stories represent in some instances both theory and method, a way of explaining phenomena or illustrating how behaviour or actions contribute to living in a good way.
  • Community involvement and the co-creation of knowledge, as appropriate, are considered essential, especially in data interpretation. In this context, the co-creation of knowledge could include interpretative approaches that are jointly developed, reviewed and confirmed by and with community members or their community-delegated organization.
  • Where appropriate, priority should be given to Aboriginal students and postdoctoral researchers when training opportunities are offered.

2. Feasibility—The plan to achieve excellence:

  • The research should address the needs of each partner, if applicable, and demonstrate how the research meets these identified needs.
  • The application should demonstrate how outputs will be made available to, and potentially used by, Aboriginal Peoples and other stakeholders, with community benefits configured into the research outputs. Examples of outreach may include: websites, videos, presentations, artistic or community exhibits, performances, or festivals.
  • The availability and nature of organizational or administrative infrastructure varies from community to community. This aspect should be considered in the structuring of the research in ways that acknowledge and maximize the contributions of a community partner organization.
  • Where required by the funding opportunity, the leveraging of cash and/or in-kind support from host institutions and partners can include social capital, an asset that may emphasize social and familial relationships and networks and may affect the cost of research. Furthermore, linguistic capital, the ability to engage in the community with the ancestral language(s) of the community and a national language of Canada, can also be considered as a contribution.
  • Expectations about the management and governance of the coproduction and outputs of knowledge and related support, during and beyond the award, should be outlined.

3. Capability—The expertise to succeed:

  • The career and academic stages, as well as the rates of research and publication contributions, of applicants and team members need to be reviewed with respect to the following considerations:
    • Aboriginal scholars may have had to start their academic path later in life, or have had interruptions.
    • For some scholars, there are expectations that they significantly contribute to and engage with their home community.
    • Applicants’ accountability to their postsecondary community is also important, as demonstrated by Aboriginal scholars providing support that could include providing student support, teacher training, committee work, and cultural sensitivity training to non-Aboriginal scholars; and contributing to the incorporation of Aboriginal knowledge systems, language, culture and experiences into their postsecondary institutions, including through the creation of associated programs.
    • In the Special Circumstances section, reviewers should take into account the degree of difficulty in an applicant’s career as a useful measure of merit, especially where they have succeeded in overcoming career obstacles.
    • The relevant experience of Aboriginal scholars should take into account the life/knowledge journey of individuals.
  • Collaborators who are considered to have a strong role and community connection should be regarded favourably in the review of Aboriginal research. In particular, elders and community-based partners need to be recognized and respected in terms of their contribution of knowledge assets.

Source: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. Guidelines for Merit Review of Aboriginal Research Retrieved from: http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/funding-financement/merit_review-evaluation_du_merite/guidelines_research-lignes_directrices_recherche-eng.aspx on August 1, 2016

Call for proposals- Concurrent sessions Canadian Association of Graduate Studies Annual Conference. Due: Apr 30, 2016

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Call for proposals- Concurrent sessions
 
CAGS invites submissions for concurrent sessions for the 2016 CAGS Annual Conference to be held at the Hyatt Regency in Toronto, November 2-4.  
 
All submissions should reflect this year’s conference theme:
 
Accessing graduate studies
 
We welcome proposals that touch on topics that address aboriginal issues; issues of disability; issues relating to financial and/or social challenges facing graduate students. Proponents are urged to develop panels providing a well-rounded discussion and practical advice if possible to the particular issue being addressed. A concurrent session lasts 75 minutes and should allow sufficient time for adequate discussion and exchange with participants. Student perspectives are welcomed.
 
Please provide a working session title, a description, and name(s) of proposed speaker(s). 
 
Please note that there is no monetary compensation awarded to speakers. CAGS can provide some audio-visual assistance for presentations.
 
Proposals will be accepted until April 30, 2016.
 
Forward proposals and contact information to lbenoit@cags.ca  using the title: “Concurrent session 2016”.

 

Inuk woman from the Kivalliq wins national quilting award

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Inuk woman from the Kivalliq wins national quilting award

Veronica Puskas wins an award for excellence at Quilt Canada’s national juried show

CBC News Posted: Jun 26, 2014 5:57 AM CTLast Updated: Jun 26, 2014 12:43 PM CT

Veronica Puskas, who grew up in Nunavut’s Kivalliq region, won the award for Excellence in Work by a first-time exhibitor award at Quilt Canada’s national juried show in St. Catharines, Ont.

Veronica Puskas, who grew up in Nunavut’s Kivalliq region, won the award for Excellence in Work by a first-time exhibitor award at Quilt Canada’s national juried show in St. Catharines, Ont. (Courtesy Veronica Puskas)

(Note: CBC does not endorse and is not responsible for the content of external links.)

A former resident of Nunavut and the Northwest Territories has been recognized at a national quilt show.

Veronica Puskas, who grew up in Nunavut’s Kivalliq region, won the award for Excellence in Work by a first-time exhibitor award at Quilt Canada’s national juried show in St. Catharines, Ont.

Veronica Puskas quilt

Veronica Puskas’ quilt, called ‘Pillars of Strength,’ is based on a photo of her mother and grandmother at the Meliadine River near Rankin Inlet in 1950. (Canadian Quilters’ Association)

Her quilt, called Pillars of Strength, is based on a photo of her mother and grandmother at the Meliadine River near Rankin Inlet in 1950.

Puskas says the quilt honours her grandmother, but making it also helped her.

“I hope to encourage people that are going through difficult times that through doing some artwork or doing something to make something beautiful is very cathartic,” she says. “It helps you deal with the emotions and the hurt while doing it.”

Puskas says she started working on the project many years ago and then set it aside. In the end, it was truly a labour of love.

Veronica Puskas quilt (detail)

Detail from Pillars of Strength. (Canadian Quilters’ Association)

“Mom used to tell us you can do better than that and that’s all I kept hearing.”

Puskas’ quilt was selected out of about 80 entries in her category.

Marilyn Michelin, chair of the event, says Puskas’ skill is remarkable.

“To do people in a picture is just unbelievable,” she says. “The talent that people have for that.”

Puskas now lives in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario.

She says she’ll keep using Nunavut and the North as inspiration for future projects.

Nuliavuk

Nuliavuk by Veronica Puskas was recently displayed at a local exhibit in Ontario. (Yellowknife Quilters’ Guild)

Reference:

(2016, January 18) Inuk woman from the Kivalliq wins national quilting award. CBC News. Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/inuk-woman-from-the-kivalliq-wins-national-quilting-award-1.2688197?cmp=abfb

[in education] New Issue Published

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Readers:

[in education], an open access, peer reviewed journal exploring the
landscape of the field of education has just published its latest issue at
http://ineducation.ca/ineducation. We invite you to review the Table of
Contents here and then visit our web site to review articles and items of
interest.

Thanks for the continuing interest in our work,

Patrick Lewis, Editor-in-Chief
Shuana Niessen, Managing Editor, in education

[in education] is a peer-reviewed, open access journal based in the Faculty
of Education at the University of Regina, in Saskatchewan, Canada. The
journal has been in existence since 1993, but published its first issue as
an online journal in December of 2009. To access archives, click on the
archives tab.

Follow in education on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ineducationca

in education
Vol 21, No 2 (2015): Autumn 2015
Table of Contents
http://ineducation.ca/ineducation/issue/view/23

Editorial
——–
Editorial (1-2)
James McNinch,  Valerie Mulholland

Articles
——–
Possibilities for Students At-Risk: Schools as Sites for Personal
Transformation (3-25)
Brenda J. McMahon
The Gap Between Text and Context: An Analysis of Ontario’s Indigenous
Education Policy (26-48)
Jesse K. Butler
Thinking Together:  A Duoethnographic Inquiry Into the Implementation of a
Field Experience Curriculum (49-64)
Jackie Seidel,  Laurie Hill
Finding Courage in the Unknown: Transformative Inquiry as Indigenist Inquiry
(65-88)
Michele Tanaka
Indigenous Knowledge Realized: Understanding the Role of Service Learning at
the Intersection of Being a Mentor and a College-Going American Indian
(89-109)
Christine A. Nelson,    Natalie R. Youngbull
Inquiring Into the Assessment Education of Preservice Teachers: A
Collaborative Self-Study of Teacher Educators (110-126)
Elizabeth Ann Munroe,   Jennifer Mitton-Kükner, Deborah Graham
Using Art-Based Ways of Knowing to Explore Leadership and Identity With
Native American Deaf Women (127-149)
Damara Goff Paris
Reading Silenced Narratives: A Curricular Journey Into Innu Poetry and
Reconciliation (150-170)
Julie Vaudrin-Charette
Bush Cree Storytelling Methodology: Northern Stories that Teach, Heal, and
Transform (171-178)
Herman Michell

Book Review
——–
A Review of There is No Need to Talk About This: Poetic Inquiry from the Art
Therapy Studio, by Karen O. Wallace (179-181)
Shuana Niessen

________________________________________________________________________
in education
http://ineducation.ca

CFP – Engaging Indigenous Communities, Due: June 26, 2015

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Special Issue Call for Papers

Guest Editors:

Winona Wheeler and Robert Alexander Innes

The way in which scholarly work and research has been commonly pursued on Indigenous cultures and peoples has been subject to criticism for a number of decades. As early as 1969 Vine Deloria Jr. in Custer Died for Your Sins criticized scholars for engaging in useless and objectifying research, and argued for relevant community-driven research. While community-engaged research has been gaining traction in the academy recently, community engagement has been an important dimension and principle of Indigenous research for quite some time. Since the 1980s Indigenous scholars from across the globe assert that Indigenous-focused research needs to be respectful, collaborative and useful. Today we have witnessed the shift from “Indigenous as object” of study to community-engaged collaborative research that is based on and driven by Indigenous agency.

We invite contributions from community and university based researchers, teachers, and scholars who actively and purposefully participate in community-engaged research, teaching and learning with Indigenous peoples, in Canada and around the World.  Engaged scholarship most commonly refers to a range of collaborative research, teaching, and learning initiatives rooted in sustained community-university partnerships, and pursued across various disciplines and social and cultural contexts. Community Engaged Research is understood to be community situated, collaborative, and action oriented such that the research process and results are useful to community members in making positive changes. In this special issue we will profile a number of Indigenous community engaged research projects with the intent of identifying best practices.

We are seeking the following submissions:  essays; research reports; conference papers, reports on research in progress; audio, artistic or visual outcomes of research; book reviews (by invitation from the Journal).

The topics directly related to Indigenous community engaged research for you to consider include:

  • Explorations of the meaning(s), process(es), theory(ies), and practice(s) of Indigenous community engaged research (discipline specific or interdisciplinary),
  • The nature, scope and practice of collaborative experience,
  •  the benefits and challenges of collaborative participatory research with Indigenous communities
  • Reports on research in progress
  • Audio, artistic and/or visual outcomes
  • the process of knowledge co-production translation and transmission/dissemination
  • evaluating project outcomes
  • undergraduate Indigenous community engaged research, experiential learning, community service learning and the scholarship of engagement
  • the relationship between Indigenous community engaged research and teaching shared paths and intersections

To insure the Journal secures the right and best peers to review your work, please first submit to us your shortpaper proposal (250 words) and bio (250 words) by Friday, June 26, 2015. Your proposal needs to identify the focus and content of your prospective paper, the disciplinary training of the authors, the section of the Journal you are submitting to (for peer-reviewed or editor-reviewed section), and whether you will have additional visual or audio material that you would like to include in your submission.

Please submit your paper by Friday, September 25, 2015. All submissions will undergo editorial or blind peer review. Submissions for the Essays Section of the Journal will be subject to blind peer review, submissions to other Journal sections will undergo editorial review.

Essays (maximum 8,000 words) that will be subject to blind peer reviewing should:

  • Represent original, unpublished work that is not under consideration by other journals or collections of essays
  • Written in accessible language, to respect multidisciplinary nature of the Journal and the diversity of our readers
  • Include an abstract (200 words) and indicate up to five keywords
  • Be typed, double-spaced throughout, in 12-pt Times New Roman font
  • Be formatted in the American Psycholog5cal Association (APA) style, 6th edition
  • Have a separate cover page that includes the names, institutional affiliations, addresses, and contact information of all authors
  • Include author biography/ies (no more than 50 words per author) on a separate sheet
  • Indicate that appropriate Institutional Research Ethics Board approval was secured, if applicable
  • Be formatted and saved in Microsoft Word (no PDF please)
  • Be submitted in two versions, one should include all information to be published, and in the other copy information to be ‘blinded’ should be substituted with blank underlined spaces. Information to be ‘blinded’ includes all text or data that will have to be removed from the essay for blind peer review purposes

Please submit via email to engaged.scholar@usask.ca.

Deadline for proposals:                    Friday, June 26, 2015

Deadline for all contributions:          Friday, September 25, 2015

Expected date of publication:               Spring 2016

Norman Taylor Memorial Bursaries & Scholarships, Due: July 24

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Norman Taylor Memorial Bursaries & Scholarships

Applications for the Norman Taylor Memorial Bursary Program close July 24. There are four $1,000 bursaries. Bursaries are available to First Nation, Inuit and Métis students attending university or college as a full-time student in an academic program such as Business Administration, Business Management, Accounting, Commerce and/or other finance related programs. View the guidelines and application form.

Applications for the Norman Taylor Memorial Professional Development Scholarship Program close July 24. Two scholarships of $800 are available for two applicants who wish to enroll in one AFOA Canada (Aboriginal Financial Officers Association of Canada) online course. View the guidelines and application form.