K-12 teaching

7th Aboriginal Math Symposium, First Nations Longhouse. 9:00 am – 3:00 pm, May 11, 2017.

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7th Aboriginal Math Symposium

 

Thursday May 11, 2017

First Nations Longhouse

1985 West Mall UBC

9:00 am – 3:00 pm

Please join us for the 7th Aboriginal Math K-12 Symposium at the First Nations Longhouse, UBC on May 11 2017. This symposium is an opportunity for teachers, administrators, Ministry representatives, community members, and academics to connect, explore, imagine and share new ideas, resources and research on Aboriginal mathematics education from kindergarten to Grade 12. Together we hope to:

  • Learn about new research in mathematics and Aboriginal education
  • Discuss and share approaches, research and educational projects for improving Aboriginal math education
  • Develop community connections to facilitate and support improving Aboriginal math education

Please direct questions about the symposium to:

Kwesi Yaro kwesi.yaro@alumni.ubc.ca
Registration open by mid March 2017.

 

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Registration Now Open: 6th Aboriginal Math Symposium, May 12, 2016 | 8:45 am – 3pm

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6th Aboriginal Math K-12 Symposium

Thursday May 12, 2016  |  8:45 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
First Nations Longhouse, 1985 West Mall, UBC Point Grey Campus

The 6th Aboriginal Math K-12 Symposium is an opportunity for teachers, administrators, community members, Ministry of Education representatives, and academics to connect, explore, imagine and share new ideas, resources and research on Aboriginal mathematics education from Kindergarten to Grade 12. The purposes of the Symposium are to: share research and educational projects about improving Aboriginal math education K-12 and develop community connections to facilitate and support improving Aboriginal mathematics education.

Support for the symposium is provided by: the UBC Faculty of Education’s Indigenous Education Institute of Canada, the Department of Curriculum & Pedagogy, and NITEP; the Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences (PIMS); and the Actuarial Foundation of Canada.

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Dear Aboriginal Math Symposium participant

Registration for the 6th Aboriginal Math Symposium is now available at:
Thanks for your patience.
We are fine tuning the program and will send it to you shortly.
We’d like to acknowledge the rich work you and those in the network are doing by celebrating opportunities to learn from each other. So we’d like to create a list of Lesson Activity Titles (No! not the whole lesson – just the Title) with connections to contributors so we know what we’re trying out, experimenting, and playing with for connecting math and Aboriginal/Indigenous education.
This is great opportunity to learn from each other. When registering click “Yes” to offer a title for a lesson that you’ve tried or are working on.
Please let us know if you have any questions by contacting Kwesi Yaro our Aboriginal Math Symposium Graduate Assistant at kwesi.yaro@alumni.ubc.ca

Can University Professors Benefit from K-12 Progressive Teaching Tactics?

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| March 10, 2014

 

“Some university teaching practices are held sacred, but perhaps college professors can learn from progressive teaching tactics of K-12 classrooms.

Case in point: Joshua Spodek who attended EduCon, a conference designed for K-12 educators mostly out of curiosity, left the weekend committed to revamping a New York University graduate level business course using what he learned about the tenets of inquiry-based learning. Educators at the conference helped him think through how it would work and pointed out how well suited his class would be for inquiry — for one primary reason: His students pay money to take courses they have already expressed interest in learning.

“As I heard more people talking, I realized that [an inquiry] style of teaching would be more useful to me than the traditional style,” Spodek said. He’d originally prepared to lead the entrepreneurial marketing and sales class the way many professors do; he sat down and figured out what he wanted students to know, put that information in a specific order and mapped out how he’d teach the content to them. He planned on giving them homework to make sure they were understanding the information he fed them and he would test them to make sure they were doing the work.”

 

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