land stewardship

Job – Program Coordinator, Get Outside BC for Youth in Care, P/T Position. Due: Feb 13, 2017 –

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Program Coordinator – Get Outside BC for Youth in Care

Program Coordinator – Get Outside BC for Youth in Care
Part-Time Contract Position

Are you passionate about protecting B.C.’s ocean and wilderness and keeping B.C.’s public land and water wild forever? Are you excited by the opportunities and challenges that come with working in a complicated social and political landscape with a myriad of views on the best solutions?

CPAWS-BC is seeking a dynamic Program Coordinator to lead the creation of a new a CPAWS-BC program, Get Outside BC for Youth in Care. Based at the CPAWS-BC office in Vancouver, the Program Coordinator will be responsible for coordinating and executing all aspects of the Get Outside BC for Youth In Care Program. The Program Coordinator ensures the smooth delivery of the program objectives and positive participant experience while maintaining partner relationships and administrating the day to day project tasks. The Program Coordinator will work closely with the Executive Director and Community Engagement Coordinator.
The Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, BC Chapter (CPAWS-BC) is one of Canada’s oldest non-profit conservation groups. We protect wilderness in every corner of BC and deep into the ocean. We have been protecting BC’s nature since 1978 and are dedicated to keeping BC’s public land and water wild forever. We need help protecting wilderness in every corner of B.C. and deep into the ocean. Is that you?
CPAWS-BC’s hiring practices give priority to Aboriginal people and people who face barriers to employment. We encourage applications from former youth in the foster care system and Indigenous people living in BC.
Key Responsibilities:

Community Engagement

  • Build, manage and maintain relationships with program partners to further program objectives;
  • Coordinate all aspects of the Get Outside BC for Youth in Care program, including assisting youth participants with problem solving and planning, as well as evaluating and reporting on the program;
  • Recruit youth in or who have transitioned out of the foster care system to join the Youth Advisory Committee;
  • Coordinate and complete administrative tasks relating to program activities;
  • Facilitate Youth Advisory Committee meetings, workshops, and presentations in both indoor and outdoor settings;
  • Lead outdoor activities (e.g. hiking, snowshoeing, canoeing, etc.)
  • Create and implement the Get Outside BC for Youth in Care program using feedback from the Youth Advisory Committee and social service organization;
  • Track expenditures and manage program budget; and
  • Serve as an ambassador for the organization, leaving all with a positive perception if the organization and its staff.

Monitoring and Evaluation

  • Ensure the Get Outside BC for Youth in Care program has a clear strategy, deliverables, and assessment tools (to measure success); and
  • Regularly report back on program using reliable metrics and evaluation tools.

Core Requirements/ Competencies:

  • Problem solver and solutions based thinker, who is able to demonstrate a passion for community engagement
  • Must have a strong understanding of privilege and oppression and how it impacts community engagement/community work in the context of youth in the foster care system
  • Experience in planning and program management, including goal setting, determining strategies to move a program forward, create and implement action plans, manage budgets, and monitor and evaluate programs in order to report on deliverables
  • Flexibility/ adaptability. Tolerant of a constantly changing work environment and adjust quickly to changing priorities and conditions
  • Experience facilitating workshops for youth and adults
  • Experience leading outdoor activities
  • Community organizing

 

Qualifications:

  • 2 years experience working with vulnerable populations or at-risk-youth in an outdoor setting
  • Experience in the fields of environmental stewardship, environmental education, and curriculum development is considered an asset
  • Experience with Microsoft Office suite
  • A valid class 5 (or higher) driver’s licence without restrictions
  • A clear criminal record with respect to working with youth and vulnerable populations (the actual criminal check will be done using our system after the interview – do not do in advance)
  • Ability to work in Canada, without restrictions

Additional Asset Criteria:

  • Lived experience with the Foster Care system
  • Additional fluency in languages other than English
  • Experience working in the NGO/ENGO sector
  • A passion for conservation work
  • An ability to work in a fast paced, high distraction environment
  • Being extremely well organized

Note: This position may include working with vulnerable people and therefore a successful Criminal Records Check will be required. CPAWS-BC will conduct the records check for the successful candidate. Please do not apply for a Criminal Records Check in advance of being offered the position as CPAWS-BC has a specific system that we are required to use.

Location and working environment: This is a six month part-time, 20 hours per week, contract position at CPAWS-BC’s downtown Vancouver office. Our work environment appeals to self-directed, flexible team players who have excellent interpersonal skills. Our office is close to multiple transit options and we have an open, hard-working, fun, and creative team environment.

Compensation: Compensation starts at $20 per hour and increases on a scale commensurate with the experience of the successful candidate.

Preferred start date: Late February or Early March, 2017

 

Application Process

Applications: Please send a cover letter and resume with the subject line: “Program Coordinator Position” to the attention of the CPAWS-BC Hiring Committee at hiring@cpawsbc.org. No phone calls or inquiries please.

Please ensure that your cover letter indicates how you meet the CPAWS-BC’s Core Requirements and Qualifications, as well as how your past experience will make you successful with this position’s Key Responsibilities.

Deadline: 13 February 2017, at 11:59pm

Please note that we will not be able to respond to applicants until after the deadline, with the exception of an auto-response that you will receive immediately to indicate that your application has been received.

For more information on CPAWS-BC visit our website at www.cpawsbc.org and sign-up on our mailing list, or connect with us on Twitter and Facebook: cpawsbc

CFP – Ethics of Belonging: Protocols, Pedagogies, Land and Stories – Indigenous Literary Studies Association Conference. Due: Jan 31, 2017

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Ethics of Belonging: Protocols, Pedagogies, Land and Stories: ILSA’s Annual Conference

this year held at the Stó:lō Nation Teaching Longhouse 7201 Vedder Road, Chilliwack on the Unceded, traditional territories of the Stó:lō peoples

We invite scholars, knowledge-keepers, artists, and community members to join us in generating new conversations about protocols, pedagogies, land, and stories from a wide variety of perspectives, including tribally-centred, inter-tribal, pan-national, urban/suburban, and trans-Indigenous, at ILSA’s third annual gathering, this time taking place on the unceded, traditional territories of the Stó:lō peoples in the Stó:lō Teaching Longhouse in Chilliwack, B.C. In a 2007 essay Stó:lō historian Dr. Albert Sonny Naxaxalhts’i McHalsie shares a Halq’emélem statement that is often interpreted as an assertion of Aboriginal rights and title: “S’ólh Téméxw te ikw’elo. Xolhmet te mekw’stam it kwelat,” which can be translated as “This is our Land. We have to take care of everything that belongs to us” (85). As McHalsie reflects on the boundaries of his territory, he follows the protocols of his community, consulting his elders to uncover teachings embedded in the Halq’emélem language and in Stó:lō stories. Through these protocols he replaces Western concepts of ownership with Stó:lō understandings of personal connection to place, sharing stories that explicate multiple ways of reading the land around him. McHalsie concludes that the statement is not merely an assertion of what belongs to Stó:lō but of belonging, insisting that as his people take care of their territory they necessarily have to take care of stories and understandings of the world embedded within wider kinship relations—between communities, nations, cultures, languages, as well as with the other-than-human.

Inspired by McHalsie’s words, Ethics of Belonging: Protocols, Pedagogies, Land and Stories asks participants to consider ways in which our scholarship, activism, and creative work cares for stories and centres Indigenous perspectives. In what ways can this care and attention honour Indigenous protocols and shape our pedagogies? How might writers or artists who live distanced or alienated from home territories practice such ethics? How might we consider Indigenous cultural production in cyberspace as linked to land? What does it mean to read texts through treaty documents, the history of colonization, or stories that emerge from land-theft and dislocation? What new traditions are Indigenous people, especially those who live in the city, creating?

The Indigenous Literary Studies Association supports diverse modes of creating and disseminating knowledge. Prospective participants are invited to propose conference papers, panels, roundtables, workshops, performances, and other formats for special sessions. Panel sessions will be 90 minutes in duration, with at least 15 minutes for questions and discussion. In keeping with our desire to enable dialogue and community- based learning, we welcome session proposals that utilize non-standard or alternative formats. While open to all proposals dealing with Indigenous literary arts, ILSA encourages proposals for sessions and individual presentations that engage with the following topics:

• “Taking care of everything that belongs to us,” land claims and cultural repatriation
• Stó:lō narrative arts and Stó:lō literary history, present, and future
• Politics of belonging and kinship relations
• Land, ecological responsibility, and environmental ethics
• Land-based solidarities, urban Indigenous communities, and the literary arts
• Literary methods and Indigenous protocols
• The politics of protocols—gender and surveillance
• Two-Spirit and queer Indigenous critical ecologies
• Land, stories, and narrative arts as praxis
• Autonomy and alliance in unceded traditional territories
• Community-based participatory research, pedagogies, and literary studies
• Alliances among Indigenous and diasporic artists
• Mediations of orality and Indigenous material cultures
• Collaborative creation and multi-media
• Artistic expressions of sovereignty and self-determination
• Responsibility, community, and artistic expression
• Community-specific Indigenous knowledge and ethics in scholarship or art
• methodologies and practices in Indigenous literary studies to serve the needs of Indigenous communities

The Indigenous Literary Studies Association (ILSA) was founded in 2014 to promote the scholarship and teaching of Indigenous writing and storytelling in Canada. One way to make our study of Indigenous literatures relevant to the writers who produce the stories we read, teach and study is to meet every other year at national conferences as part of Congress, and meet alternating years in Indigenous communities. In 2015 we met at Six Nations of the Grand River, near Hamilton, Ontario, and in 2016 we met at Congress, hosted that year at the University of Calgary. From June 18-20, 2017 we will be meeting on the unceded, traditional territories of the Stó:lō peoples, in Chilliwack, B.C., about a half hour drive from the Abbotsford airport and about a one and a half hour drive from downtown Vancouver. This time was chosen to coincide with the annual conference of NAISA, the Native American and Indigenous Studies Association meeting, at UBC from June 22-24, 2017.

Proposals are due on Tuesday, January 31, 2017 and this year’s proposals can be submitted to ilsa@sfu.ca. If you do not receive an acknowledgment of your proposal within 7 days, please contact the ILSA council members directly, especially in-coming ILSA President Deanna Reder or ILSA Secretary Sophie McCall. We remind you that prospective participants must be members in order to present at ILSA 2017 in Chilliwack.

Membership Rates are $40 (faculty) or $20 (students, community members, or underwaged) for one year. Please visit our website at
ILSA 2017 Call for Papers
http://www.indigenousliterarystudies.org/membership-1/ to complete your membership.

Thank you for your continued support. Please note that for the 2016-2017 year, we will be using this email, ilsa@sfu.ca; we encourage our members to contact the ILSA Council directly should you have any concerns or ideas you wish to share.

The Indigenous Literary Studies Association Council 2016-2017
Deanna Reder, President (dhr@sfu.ca)
Jesse Archibald-Barber, President Elect (jbarber@firstnationsuniversity.ca)
Sophie McCall, Secretary (smccall@sfu.ca)
June Scudeler, Treasurer (june.scudeler@gmail.com)
Sarah Henzi, Early Career Member (sarahhenzi@gmail.com)
Angela Semple, Graduate Member (angelasemple@trentu.ca)
Sam McKegney, Past President (sam.mckegney@queensu.ca) http://www.indigenousliterarystudies.org
Email: ilsa@sfu.ca

Victory in the Release of Guatemalan Political Prisoner Rigoberto Juarez

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August 6, 2016

By Linda Ferrer

July 22, 2016 marked a day of victory, not only for Rigoberto Juarez Mateo, but also for the Indigenous Q’anjob’al Maya community in the municipality of Santa Eulalia, Huehuetenango, Guatemala. In a split decision made by Judges Yasmin Barrios, Patricia Bustamante, and Gerbi Sical, seven Ancestral Authorities, including Rigoberto Juarez, Domingo Baltazar, Ermitano Lopez Reyes, Sotero Adalberto Villatoro, Francisco Juan Pedro, Mynor Lopez, and Arturo Pablo were released from prison, five of whom were acquitted of all charges.

Sixteen months ago, Rigoberto Juarez, one of nine Ancestral Authorities, was detained for his advocacy against two private hydroelectric and mining companies, Hidra Energia and Hidro Santa Cruz, respectively, for their failing to comply and consult with Indigenous communities’ prior to accessing licensure for their projects. Posing a threat to their natural resources, land, and way of life, those who resisted the projects faced threats, coercion, and were sometimes kidnapped, raped, or even murdered. Rigoberto Juarez and Domingo Baltazar, two well-known Indigenous leaders, traveled to Guatemala City to file reports on these various human rights violations to the Department of Public Ministry and the United Nations Commission for Human Rights but both were arrested by police without warrant or charges. They were illegally imprisoned without due process on that day of March 23, 2015. Rigoberto Juarez was placed in High Risk Group A preventive detention center for false accusations in a series of crimes which the private companies claimed against them. Sixteen charges were then made against him, including public disturbances of peaceful demonstrations, kidnapping, and intent to commit crimes. However, the lack of evidence and factual grounds for the heinous charges that were made only indicate that the hydroelectric and mining companies, working with the Mayor and judicial system of Guatemala, strategically organized the persecution and arrest of the community leaders in order to remove their voice and actions from the resistance movement he had begun and committed to since 2008. Read more…

Million-acre St. Lawrence Island land title signed over to native population

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By Travis Khachatoorian / KTUU |

SAINT LAWRENCE ISLAND, Alaska – In one of the biggest land conveyances in US history, the federal government officially signed the title to Saint Lawrence Island over to its native population.

More than one million acres of land was researched and surveyed by the Bureau of Land Management in preparation for the title transfer. Using GPS mapping and aerial photography, the BLM took three years to complete the process before handing over ownership of the island.

“This is the largest survey we have ever done, and the fourth largest conveyance that the US government has ever done in one fell swoop,” said BLM director Neil Kornze.

Multiple BLM officials from Washington DC, Anchorage and Nome flew into the villages of Gambell and Savoonga on Wednesday for an official document signing ceremony. The conveyance of land finalizes a process the Alaska Natives of St. Lawrence Island have been waiting for since President Nixon signed the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971 (ANCSA.)

“The descendants of our forefathers would have clapped their hands just like we did with the signing of the patent,” said Gambell village elder Branson Tungiyan.

With the title in hand, the villages of Gambell and Savoonga will share ownership of the sixth biggest island in the US.

Full ownership of the island was a decision made by the village elders decades ago. When ANCSA first passed, villages across Alaska were offered a piece of a near billion dollar settlement to sell large portions of their land to the federal government.

Savoonga and Gambell elders opted out of the payout. Instead they received no money, no opportunity to become part of a larger regional native corporation, but rather received opportunity to own the former St. Lawrence Island Reserve, now giving them 900 miles of coastline, mountains and lakes.

“One of the things [the elders] told us is, ‘as long as you are owners of the island, the island will take care of you,’” said president of Kukulget Corporation Perry Pungowiyi.

“You keep the land instead of the money, because money runs out,” said Tungiyan.

The BLM gave the native population interim conveyance of the land in 1979, only to receive the final title when the government finished its survey of the land. The survey for St. Lawrence Island wasn’t completed until 2016.

“The ANCSA entitlement in total [statewide] was about 44 million acres, and that’s roughly the equivalent size of the State of Washington,” said Erika Reed, Alaska BLM deputy state director of lands, cadastral survey and pipeline monitoring. “That’s about the acreage that we’ve been surveying and conveying over the last 45 years.”

Pungowiyi said, so far there’s no plans for greater development of the island. He said, most important to the village at this point is to preserve the land their ancestors have inhabited for thousands of years.

“This is home. This is where I live. I feel at peace when I’m here. I have no worries other than fish and game,” said Pungowiyi. “Here it still feels like we’re living with our ancestors.”

Source: KTUU. Retrieved from: http://www.ktuu.com/content/news/Massive-land-transfer-388618852.html on August 1, 2016

Indigenous food trading, sharing and discussions, at Enowkin, Penticton. July 13 & 14, 2016

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1. July 13 – Following the leadership of the BC Food Systems Network Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty (WGIFS), the proposed Gathering of Indigenous Food Trading and Sharing (GIFTS) is being planned on July 13, 2016. GIFTS will provide the time and space for Indigenous harvesters to trade and share Indigenous foods and knowledge generated in inter-tribal trade relationships. The gathering is a traditional camp style gathering with free camping and all meals provided. We welcome contributions of Indigenous foods to contribute to the feasts.

Building on the conversational learning and ancient traditional trade practices and protocols, the WGIFS will realize more fully how the social and cultural values encoded within traditional trading and giving economies can inform the development of mutual aid networks. The intention is to increase the number of trading relationships in traditional trade networks, and apply an innovative approach to 1). addressing one or more of the social determinants of health, and 2). advocating for conservation of Indigenous bio-cultural heritage in the land and food system research, action and policy proposals.
2. July 14 – We are excited to celebrate our 10th Anniversary Strategic Meeting of the Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty at the En’owkin Centre in Penticton, BC, home of our very first Indigenous food sovereignty conference that took place in August of 2006. The WGIFS would like to thank the Syilx Nation and En’owkin Centre for their generous hospitality, as well as our financial sponsor the First Nations Health Authority.
The 10th annual WGIFS Strategic meeting is being planned on the day following GIFTS (July 14), and will provide the time and space to network and introduce the innovative concepts and vision of the project, and increase awareness and sensitivity to the diverse socio-political realities and cultures that are affirmed in Indigenous relationships to food, land, and inter-tribal trading and giving economies.
3. July 15, 16 & 17 – The 10th annual WGIFS meeting and GIFTS will lead into the 18th Annual BC Food Systems Network Gathering being planned for July 15, 16, & 17 at the same venue. Following the theme of Reconciling Cultures:Reconnecting Foodscapes, the BCFSN Gathering will provide the time and space for WGIFS members and Indigenous participants to reconcile Indigenous food systems with sustainable agri-food system issues, concerns, situations and strategies.
The cross cultural conversations will increase community resiliency by flexing our ability to overcome cross cultural learning tension and identify potential that exists within the gaps of knowledge where Indigenous food system meets the rapidly expanding movement of sustainable agriculture.
To RSVP reply to this message ASAP or visit our facebook events page: https://www.facebook.com/events/507787819405373/
To learn more about Indigenous food sovereignty visit our website: http://indigenousfoodsystems.org/
To register for the BC Food Systems Network Gathering go online to website address: http://bcfsn.org/annual-gathering/

Dawn Morrison,

BC Food Systems Network

Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty

C/O 555 East 55th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C, V5X 1N6
Mobile: 778.879.5106
Email: dmo6842@gmail.com
Website: www.indigenousfoodsystems.org

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wgifs@bcfsn.org
http://bcfsn.org/mailman/listinfo/wgifs_bcfsn.org

Upcoming Workshops and Volunteer Opportunities with the Indigenous Health Garden

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Upcoming Workshops and Volunteer Opportunities
  • Wednesday March 3rd, 1:00-4:00PM: Garden Volunteer Session
  • Wednesday March 9th, 1:00-4:00PM: Garden Volunteer Session
  • Wednesday March 16th, 1:00-4:00PM: Garden Volunteer Session
  • Wednesday March 24th, 1:00-4:00PM: Garden Volunteer Session
  • Thursday March 31st, 1:00-4:00PM: Garden Volunteer Session
  • Tuesday March 29th: Feast Bowl community meal hosting the Longhouse Student Lunch (info session about Indigenous Programs at UBC Farm)

How to volunteer for garden sessions: we work in the garden rain or shine, so come dressed for the weather. We have extra rain boots, gardening tools, and gloves to share. Bring a snack and water bottle – bring friends and family (of any age) too! No experience necessary. You will find us in the Indigenous Health Garden at the UBC Farm. The most up-to-date directions to the UBC Farm can be found here. Once at the Farm, you can follow the “Aboriginal Health Gardens” signs or follow this map to find our garden.

How to volunteer for the Feast Bowl: if you are new to the Feast Bowl, please fill out our volunteer sign-up form online so we can get to know you a bit better! Join us at the UBC First Nations Longhouse (1985 West Mall) at or after 9:30AM to help us harvest or cook, or 12:30PM to eat lunch with us. Extra help from any age or skill level is always appreciated, especially in the kitchen. If you can only join us for lunch, we encourage you to come anyway and we look forward to sharing a delicious meal with you!

Note: if you plan to bring a large group, please let us know ahead of time at hannah.lewis@ubc.ca.

Globally significant landmark agreement reached

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Globally significant landmark agreement reached

First Nations, environmental groups and coastal forest industry representatives joined the Province today to celebrate achieving ecosystem-based management in the Great Bear Rainforest.

The Great Bear Rainforest was established through land-use decisions announced in 2006. This globally unique area covers 6.4 million hectares on British Columbia’s north and central coast, and is home to 26 separate First Nations. Ecosystem-based management in the area is defined as “concurrent achievement of high levels of ecological integrity and high levels of human well-being.”

Under the new Great Bear Rainforest land-use order, ecological integrity is achieved through increasing the amount of protected old-growth forest to 70% from 50%. As well, eight new special forest management areas covering almost 295,000 hectares will be off-limits to logging. Six may receive additional protection based on ongoing discussions with First Nations. With the new measures, 85% of the forest will be protected and 15% will be available for logging, supporting local jobs.

The land-use order also addresses First Nations’ cultural heritage resources, freshwater ecosystems and wildlife habitat. The amount of habitat protected for the marbled murrelet, northern goshawk, grizzly bear, mountain goat and tailed frog will increase as new reserves required by the order are developed.

The Province has signed reconciliation protocols with the Coastal First Nations and Nanwakolas Council. Through these government-to-government relationships, separate human well-being agreements have been reached to address issues of special concern to each group of First Nations. Most notably, both have an increased stake in the forest sector. The commercial grizzly bear hunt will cease in Coastal First Nations’ traditional territories.

The Province has committed to amending atmospheric benefit-sharing agreements with Nanwakolas and Coastal First Nations. This will increase the forest carbon credits they can use to support implementation of ecosystem-based management and community development projects of importance to them.

Because of the uniqueness of the Great Bear Rainforest and the innovative elements in the new and amended agreements, the B.C. government intends to introduce supporting legislation in spring 2016.

https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2016PREM0011-000122