Land

Job – Landed Learning Multimedia Education Assistant, Due: Feb 24, 2017 (deadline extended

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Job Description:

The Intergenerational Landed Learning Project is a unique community education and research project that teams school-aged youth with adult volunteers to build a multigenerational community that learns how to nurture the land and live in balance with the earth, through growing, caring for, cooking, and eating local food.

The Landed Learning Multimedia Education Assistant will use a variety of media (visual, written, and digital) to support the academic, programmatic, research, and fundraising objectives of the Intergenerational Landed Learning Project (ILLP). The Multimedia Education Assistant will develop multi-media educational programming for participants in the Landed Learning Project, as well as integrate multi-media into the communications strategy for the Landed Learning Project. By using multimedia, the student will help participants deepen, enhance, and solidify learning, as well as cultivate enthusiasm for gardens-based learning among the wider community.

The student must be able to commit to being available Wednesday and Thursday mornings, 9am-Noon.

Hourly wage: $16.41

10 hours/week

March-June 2017

The responsibilities include:

Designing and implementing media education programs within the framework of the Project

  • Develop and facilitate photography workshops for elementary program participants in the garden
  • Develop and facilitate blog training workshops for elementary program participants to share their garden-based learning experiences
  • Provide on-going support youth to document their experiences and learning through photography, writing, and photo journalism

Managing the Project’s photography equipment, photos, and other data archives

  • Maintain and troubleshoot program cameras used by program participants
  • Liaise with ILLP teachers to facilitate ongoing documentation, data collection, and reporting of student activities within participating classes
  • Organize, maintain, and archive ILLP documents (e.g. Photographs, surveys, consent forms, volunteer criminal record checks, volunteers hours)

Developing and managing the Project’s communication strategy

  • Document ILLP visits and events through digital photography
  • Select and provide photos for communication and outreach on social media and print materials Student Job
  • Liaise with Web Assistant to design a visual appealing and informative website, relevant to stakeholder audiences (educators, volunteers, parents, students, and funders)
  • Manage social media (Facebook page and blog) to keep stakeholders connected with the Project through a consistent and dynamic on-line presence

Supporting Program Manager and other program activities as needed

Qualifications:

  • Must be a UBC Student
  • Must be available Wednesday and Thursday mornings, 9am-Noon
  • Experience developing curriculum and working with children
  • Aptitude in and experience with on-line communications and social media
  • Expertise with digital cameras, iPads, and digital photography for photodocumentation and reporting (Having your own camera is an asset)
  • Ability to communicate with diplomacy and tact with children, community volunteers, staff, teachers, and donors
  • Interest in and respect for people of all cultures and backgrounds
  • Self-motivation, flexibility, and excellent organization skills; ability to identify and prioritize multiple tasks with minimal supervision
  • Ability to work effectively both in a team setting as well as independently; team player
  • Physically healthy and active. Able to work outdoors in all weather conditions
  • Familiarity with, and commitment to the vision and mission of the Intergenerational Landed Learning project is an asset
  • Successful completion of a criminal record check is required

To Apply: Please send Resume, Cover Letter, and Time Table to landed.learning@ubc.ca. Applications must be received no later than February 17, 2017.

Indigenous Resurgence in an Age of Reconciliation, Pre-symposium and Symposium events – March 15-18, 2017.

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Pre-Symposium Event: Landsdowne Lecture with Leanne Betasamosake Simpson

March 15th 5:00 pm, First Peoples House, Ceremonial Hall

Hosted by the Department of Political Science

Freedom Sings: Land/Bodies/Resurgence

This talk will explore Indigenous resurgence and nationhood through story, song and video. Leanne will discuss resurgence as an ongoing intervention into the colonial project by sharing works from her recent album f(l)ight (RPM Records), her new book of short stories This Accident of Being Lost (House of Anansi) and her forthcoming academic work on the The Radical Resurgence Project (UMP Press). More information about Leanne Simpson.

See poster

Symposium: Indigenous Resurgence in an Age of Reconciliation March 15-18, 2017

  • This symposium will bring together many prominent Indigenous scholars in the fields of Political Science, Law and Indigenous Governance to consider the long intellectual tradition of Indigenous resurgence within these fields while looking toward new directions in consideration of the challenges and possibilities produced in the era of reconciliation. The aim in hosting this event is to cultivate an environment for productive discussion of a central concern facing Indigenous resurgence: our relationships with creation (land, water, animals, ancestors) and how these relationships have been impacted by reconciliation politics.

Speakers: Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark, Dian Million, Sheryl Lightfoot, Christine O’Bonsawin, Taiaiake Alfred, Glen Coulthard, Sarah Hunt, Aimee Craft, Audra Simpson, Hayden King, Nick Claxton, Hokulani Aikau, Daniel Heath Justice. This event will take place at the University of Victoria at the First Peoples House from March 15th to 18th 2017. No registration is required, and the event is free.

More info…

 

Interactive map by University of Georgia historian shows U.S. appropriation of over 1.5 billion acres Indigenous land, 1776-1887

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This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations.  (Above is a GIF of the map’s time-lapse display; visit the map’s page to play with its features.)

The project’s source data is a set of maps produced in 1899 by the Bureau of American Ethnology. The B.A.E. was a research unit of the Smithsonian that published and collected anthropological, archaeological, and linguistic research on the culture of North American Indians, as the nineteenth century drew to a close.

While the time-lapse function is the most visually impressive aspect of this interactive, the “source map” option (available on the map’s site) offers a deep level of detail. By selecting a source map, and then zooming in to the state you’ve selected, you can see details of the map used to generate that section of the interactive. A pop-up box tells you which Native nation was resident on the land, and the date of the treaty or executive order that transferred the area to the government, as well as offering external links to descriptions of the treaty and of the tract of land.

In the site’s “About” section (reachable by clicking on the question mark), Saunt is careful to point out that the westward-moving boundaries could sometimes be vague. Asked for an example, he pointed me to the 1791 treaty with the Cherokee that ceded the land where present-day Knoxville, Tenn. stands. The treaty’s language pointed to landmarks like “the mouth of Duck river,” a broad approach that left a lot of room for creative implementation. When dealing with semi-nomadic tribes, Saunt added, negotiators sometimes designated a small reservation, “rather than spelling out the boundaries of the cession.” Read more…

Nine First Nations Unite With Declaration Against LNG Tankers in B.C. Salmon Waters

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by Daniel Mesec on 1/26/16
To the deep beat of drums, hereditary chiefs and elders from coastal and inland First Nations entered the Highlander Hotel and Convention Centre, packed with more than 300 people. They were there for a show of strength and unity against government and the onslaught of gas development in the heart of their traditional lands, the “bread basket” of the Lax Kw’alaams people.

On Saturday January 23 the Lelu Island Declaration was signed by the nine allied tribes of Lax Kw’alaams as well as other hereditary and elected chiefs from neighboring nations, sending a clear message to government and industry that the Skeena watershed will not allow the $11 billion Pacific Northwest Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) project to be built.

The tribes decreed that First Nations have not only rights, but also responsibilities, when it comes to harvesting from and sustaining the environment.

“Our ancestral knowledge, supported by modern science, confirms this area is critical to the future abundance of the wild salmon our communities rely on,” the declaration said. “It is our right and our responsibility as First Nations to protect and defend this place. It is our right to use this area without interference to harvest salmon and marine resources for our sustenance, and commercially in support of our livelihoods.”

Salmon is the link, said Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs (UBCIC) in his remarks closing the weekend summit. Read more…

B.C. Earthquake Caused By Fracking, Investigation Reveals

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B.C. Earthquake Caused By Fracking, Investigation Reveals

Posted: 12/15/2015 10:14 pm EST

FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — The British Columbia Oil and Gas Commission has confirmed that fracking caused a 4.6-magnitude earthquake in August — the largest linked to the industry in the province to date.

The commission says an investigation has determined that the Aug. 17 quake in northeastern B.C. was caused by fluid injection from hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking.

fracking

It says 4.6-magnitude seismic events typically cause brief shaking felt at the surface but aren’t a risk to public or environmental safety.

Progress Energy (TSX:PGE), which is owned by Malaysia’s Petronas and would supply gas to the planned Pacific NorthWest LNG terminal, paused its operations after the quake struck about 114 kilometres outside of Fort St. John.

The company held the previous record for the largest known fracking-caused quake in B.C. with a 4.4-magnitude tremor in 2014.

A statement from Progress Energy says it takes the incident very seriously and it has 17 monitoring stations in its operating area to accurately detect seismic activity.

Stolen Land: First Nations, Palestinians at the Frontline of Resistance

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Stolen Land: First Nations, Palestinians
at the Frontline of Resistance

With Robert Lovelace
Queens University Lecturer & former Anoch Algonquin Chief

Friday, November 27 @ 1pm

Room 098, Henry Angus Building
2053 Main Mall, Unceded & Occupied Musqueam Territory

For more information: sphr.ubc@gmail.com

Stolen Land : Stolen Voices Canada and Israel are both built on land and resources stolen by European settlers; both are still sustained by the ongoing repression of indigenous peoples. The indigenous peoples of Canada and Palestine are on the front lines resisting the destruction of the land by militarism and industrial extraction. In the mainstream media and the halls of power, indigenous activists’ voices and stories have been silenced – they are treated as terrorists or historical curiosities. This event will explore the commonalities of indigenous struggles for land and freedom in Canada and in Palestine as well as connections to the global fight for a decolonized world.

Robert Lovelace is an adjunct lecturer at Queen’s University specialising in Aboriginal Studies, Re-indigenisation and De-colonisation. Robert is an anti-colonial activist and retired chief of the Anoch Algonquin First Nation. He spent 3½ months in jail as a political prisoner for defending the Ardoch homeland from uranium exploration. Robert has sailed twice on the Freedom Flotilla attempting to break the siege of Gaza. He lives at Eel Lake in traditional Ardoch territory.

UBC Solidarity for Palestinian Human Rights • sphr.ubc@gmail.com

Sponsored by UBC Social Justice Centre, Seriously Free Speech Committee. Endorsed by Boycott Israeli Apartheid Campaign, Canada Palestine Association/BDS Vancouver, Canadian Boat to Gaza, Independent Jewish Voices – Vancouver, Mobilisation Against War and Occupation, North West Indigenous Council, South Asian Network for Secularism and Democracy, Streams of Justice, United Network for a Just Peace in Palestine and Israel.

B.C. First Nation writes its own declaration of title rights and strategy

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B.C. First Nation writes its own declaration of title rights and strategy

THE CANADIAN PRESS OCTOBER 28, 2015
A First Nation on British Columbia’s central coast is not waiting for the provincial and federal governments to draft a reconciliation agreement. The Heiltsuk Nation has written and signed its own declaration, setting out what it says is a new mandate for a relationship within Canada.
BELLA BELLA – A First Nation on British Columbia’s central coast is not waiting for the provincial and federal governments to draft a reconciliation agreement.

The Heiltsuk Nation has written and signed its own declaration, setting out what it says is a new mandate for a relationship within Canada.

Hereditary Chief Harvey Humchitt says the First Nation has been collaborating with industry and senior governments on planning and economic opportunities, but without much progress on resource management decisions within its territories.

Chief Marilyn Slett says existing agreements will be honoured but the new approach will build a government-to-government relationship between the Heiltsuk, B.C., and Canada.

The First Nation relies on the Supreme Court of Canada’s 2014 Tsilhqot’in decision, that it says found a declaration of aboriginal title could be obtained through a negotiated agreement, or by court declaration.

Heiltsuk hereditary chiefs and elected leaders say as the sovereign authority over more than 35,000 square kilometres of the central coast, the First Nation has the right to control, manage and benefit from territorial resources.

© Copyright (c) The Vancouver Sun

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/first+nation+writes+declaration+title+rights+strategy/11474798/story.html#ixzz3q7YrYLXd