language documentation

Celebrating indigenous culture through animated film

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Ten inspiring animated shorts from 2016

December 29, 2016

With films like Pocahontas, Apocalypto, Peter Pan and The Green Inferno, it’s safe to say that Hollywood has a deplorable track record when it comes to its portrayal of Indigenous Peoples. Perhaps it’s to be expected given that films tend to be produced through a Eurocentric lens. Even when production companies try to get it right, they still somehow manage to fail–such as the case with Disney’s Moana.

It makes us all the more grateful that Hollywood has lost its monopoly on film. New Independent film makers are constantly emerging to give us something genuine, heartfelt and inspired to watch with family and friends.

This year was particularly exciting for indigenous film. Among the hundreds–if not, thousands–of feature films, documentaries and television shows that indigenous filmmakers made in 2016, indigenous nations started releasing their own independently-produced films to tell their own stories in their own words and languages.

We also saw a sturdy wave of truly inspiring animated shorts that celebrate indigenous culture, breathing new life into the incredibly rich and equally important tradition of storytelling.

We loved these animated shorts so much we just had to share them with you. Read more…

 

Source: Schertow, John Ahni. January 18, 2017. Celebrating indigenous culture through animated film. Retrieved from:  https://intercontinentalcry.org/celebrating-indigenous-culture-animated-film/

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Public Lecture by Daryl Baldwin on February 22 – “Feature Speakers” Lecture Series. 11:30am, Feb 22, 2016

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We are delighted to announce that Daryl Baldwin is the next guest in the Future Speakers lecture series supported by the Dean of Arts. 

Daryl Baldwin is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma, and Director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. His lecture, entitled “toopeeliyankwi, kati myaamiaataweeyankwi: We Succeed At Speaking The Myaamia Language,” will take place on Monday, February 22 at 11:30am in the Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall at the First Nations Longhouse. A free catered lunch will follow his talk at 1pm.
We would be grateful if you could help promote this event through your networks. We’ve attached the poster and digital signage.

Best regards,
The Faculty and Staff at the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program



The Museum of Anthropology, the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program, the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program, the Department of Linguistics, and the Department of Anthropology present a new lecture series supported by the Dean of Arts, and in partnership with the First Nations House of Learning and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, to spark a conversation about the futures of Indigenous languages in the 21st century.

Future Speakers” highlights both the struggles and the successes of Indigenous language revitalization and looks to a future where these languages are not only spoken, but thrive. The Museum of Anthropology, the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program, the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program, the Department of Linguistics, and the Department of Anthropology present a new lecture series supported by the Dean of Arts, and in partnership with the First Nations House of Learning and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, to spark a conversation about the futures of Indigenous languages in the 21st century.

Job – Program Director, Documenting Endangered Languages Program; National Science Foundation; Due Jan 23, 2015

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The National Science Foundation (NSF) is seeking a qualified candidate to serve as a Program Director in the Documenting Endangered Languages Program, in the Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences (BCS), within the Directorate for Social and Behavioral Sciences, Arlington, VA.

NSF Program Directors bear the primary responsibility for carrying out the agency’s overall mission to support innovative and merit-reviewed activities in basic research and education that contribute to the nation’s technical strength, security, and welfare. Fulfilling this responsibility requires not only knowledge in the appropriate disciplines, but also a commitment to high standards, a considerable breadth of interest and receptivity to new ideas, a strong sense of fairness, good judgment, and a high degree of personal integrity.

The Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences supports research to develop and advance scientific knowledge on human cognition, language, social behavior and culture as well as the interactions between human and natural systems. BCS programs consider proposals that fall squarely within disciplines, but they also encourage and support interdisciplinary projects. These are evaluated either through joint review among programs in BCS, joint review with programs in other Divisions, or by NSF-wide multi-disciplinary panels. All programs in BCS consider proposals for research projects, conferences, and workshops.

Documenting Endangered Languages (DEL) is an activity conducted in coordination with the National Endowment for the Humanities to develop and advance scientific and scholarly knowledge concerning endangered human languages. Made urgent by the imminent death of roughly half of the approximately 7000 currently used human languages, DEL seeks not only to acquire scientific data that will soon be unobtainable, but also to integrate, systemize, and make the resulting linguistic findings widely available by exploiting advances in information technology. The program focuses on language description, infrastructure, and computational methods.

KEY REQUIREMENTS


DUTIES:

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  • Articulate a vision for the future of the discipline and allocate program resources to maintain a balance of support to meet the field’s needs and future development;
  • Maintain an effective merit review system and post-award action process;
  • Participate in one or more cross-cutting activities within the Foundation;
  • Work cooperatively across the Division, Directorate, and Foundation, and with other agencies to accomplish the mission of NSF;
  • Participate in interagency meetings, coordinating groups, special task groups, staff meetings, and site visits;
  • Assess trends and opportunities in the field with assistance of advisory panels;
  • Pursue affirmative action and EEO goals in selection of reviewers, panelists, and grantees;
  • Represent the program to the scientific community and the public;
  • Establish contacts and maintain active involvement in the program field through participation in meetings and conferences and by undertaking other relevant activities;
  • Pursue a personal scholarly research agenda, with results presented at professional meetings and published in academic journals, as workload permits

QUALIFICATIONS REQUIRED:

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Candidates must have a Ph.D. in an appropriate field directly related to linguistics, plus after award of the Ph.D., six or more years of successful research, research administration, and/or managerial experience pertinent to the position. In addition to above qualification, experience in computational methods, cyberinfrastructure and/or cyber-capabilities is highly desired.

In addition to above qualification, the ability to organize, implement and manage a proposal-driven grant program, allocating resources to meet a spectrum of goals, including insuring transparency and accountability in the grant award/declination management process is highly desired. Candidates should be able to communicate effectively and work productively with the scientific community, peers, and co-workers at all levels to advocate program policies and plans and to fulfill NSF’s mission.
You must meet eligibility and qualification requirements before 11:59 PM Eastern time on the closing date of the job announcement.

All online applicants must provide a valid email address. If your email address is inaccurate or your mailbox is full or blocked, you may not receive important communication that could affect your consideration for this position.

HOW TO APPLY:

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Your application must be submitted online and all document faxing/uploading must be completed before 11:59 PM Eastern time on the vacancy closing date.

You must answer all of the job-related questions to ensure full consideration for this position. For more detailed information, please review our NSF eRecruit Frequently Asked Questions.

WARNING! Applications submitted online must have a valid email address. If your email address is inaccurate or your mailbox is full or blocked, you may not receive important communication that could affect your consideration for this position.

If you are unable to apply electronically, please use the Contact Information below for special instructions on how to submit your application materials. Hearing impaired individuals may call TDD (703) 292-5090 for assistance.

IMPORTANT NOTE: PLEASE DO NOT INCLUDE YOUR SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER OR DATE OF BIRTH ON YOUR APPLICATION DOCUMENTS.