language learning

Celebrating indigenous culture through animated film

Posted on

Ten inspiring animated shorts from 2016

December 29, 2016

With films like Pocahontas, Apocalypto, Peter Pan and The Green Inferno, it’s safe to say that Hollywood has a deplorable track record when it comes to its portrayal of Indigenous Peoples. Perhaps it’s to be expected given that films tend to be produced through a Eurocentric lens. Even when production companies try to get it right, they still somehow manage to fail–such as the case with Disney’s Moana.

It makes us all the more grateful that Hollywood has lost its monopoly on film. New Independent film makers are constantly emerging to give us something genuine, heartfelt and inspired to watch with family and friends.

This year was particularly exciting for indigenous film. Among the hundreds–if not, thousands–of feature films, documentaries and television shows that indigenous filmmakers made in 2016, indigenous nations started releasing their own independently-produced films to tell their own stories in their own words and languages.

We also saw a sturdy wave of truly inspiring animated shorts that celebrate indigenous culture, breathing new life into the incredibly rich and equally important tradition of storytelling.

We loved these animated shorts so much we just had to share them with you. Read more…

 

Source: Schertow, John Ahni. January 18, 2017. Celebrating indigenous culture through animated film. Retrieved from:  https://intercontinentalcry.org/celebrating-indigenous-culture-animated-film/

Advertisements

New Issue of Canadian Journal of Education

Posted on Updated on

Canadian Journal of Education

Canadian Journal of Education/Revue canadienne de l’éducation has just published its latest issue [Vol 39, No 4 (2016)] at http://www.cje-rce.ca/index.php/cje-rce. We invite you to review the Table of Contents on our site and review articles and items of interest.

Editorial/Éditorial

Editorial | December 2016 PDF
Christopher DeLuca, Theodore M. Christou 1-3

Articles

Les enseignants issus de la diversité ethnoculturelle représentent-ils une valeur ajoutée pour la profession ? Résultats d’une étude menée en Suisse romande PDF (Français)
Stéphanie Bauer, Abdeljalil Akkari 1-25
Documenter les façons de faire d’enseignants de 6e année du primaire en mathématiques, en lecture et en écriture dans toutes les étapes de la démarche d’évaluation PDF (Français)
Lakshmee Devi Ramoo, Micheline-Joanne Durand 1-24
Revisiting the Challenges Linked to Parenting and Home–School Relationships at the High School Level PDF
Rollande Deslandes, Sylvie Barma 1-32
Développer le sens du métier pour favoriser le bienêtre en formation initiale à l’enseignement PDF (Français)
Nancy Goyette 1-29
Enseigner en milieu francophone minoritaire canadien: synthèse des connaissances sur les défis et leurs implications pour la formation des enseignants PDF (Français)
Martine Cavanagh, Laurent Cammarata, Sylvie Blain 1-32
From Cultural Deprivation to Individual Deficits: A Genealogy of Deficiency in Inuit Adult Education PDF
Scott McLean 1-28
Inclusion Reconceptualized: Pre-Service Teacher Education and Disability Studies in Education PDF
Chris Gilham, Joanne Tompkins 1-25
Étude de conditions didactiques favorables à la décontextualisation des connaissances mathématiques PDF (Français)
Virginie Houle 1-19
Lire des textes de fiction et des textes informatifs aux élèves du préscolaire et du primaire : analyse des interactions extratextuelles des enseignants PDF (Français)
Anne-Marie Dionne 1-28
Evolving Practices: Admissions Policies in Ontario Teacher Education Programs PDF
Michael Holden, Julian Kitchen 1-28

Book Reviews/Recensions d’ouvrages

Indigenous Business in Canada: Principles and Practices PDF
Melanie Nelson, Matthew Waugh 1-4
Self-Construction and Social Transformation: Lifelong, Lifewide and Life-deep Learning PDF
Carl Ruest 1-4
GRIT: The Power of Passion and Perseverance PDF
Richard Morehouse

Quetzaltenango – Learn Spanish and volunteer in Guatemala

Posted on

INEPAS LOGO FINAL VECTICAL
 
Dear Sir/Madam,
 
We would like to invite the students / employees of your college / university / organization to enhance their learning, whilst experiencing life in Guatemala. Specifically, we are targeting:
·         those who want to learn Spanish with native speakers and other students alike
·         those who wish to combine this learning with voluntary work experience
·         gap-year students of any discipline seeking a voluntary internship within a development organization.
 
Briefly, INEPAS was founded in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala in 1994 as a self-sustaining non-profit organization. It is fully recognized by the Guatemalan government for performing a range of social, legal, and humanitarian projects within the framework of developing rural communities in and around Quetzaltenango. INEPAS functions solely with the help of national and international volunteers who offer their support, professional talent and work experience in diverse fields. 
INEPAS has received official recognition from UNESCO. Its first social project, the foundation and construction of a rural school in the Maya-K’iché community of Choquiac was designated by UNESCO as exemplary for other organizations that work on similar projects. INEPAS generates the necessary funds for its social aid programs through its Spanish language school, thus remaining self-sustaining and non-partisan. We offer a variety of options for individuals wishing to learn Spanish:
The Language Immersion Program: for those whose primary aim is to learn Spanish. 
This is tailored to meet the needs of the individual, comprising of structured, intensive one-to-one tuition daily. Daily socio-cultural activities are arranged according to the interests of the students, including visits to local villages, trips to areas of natural beauty, films, sports and conferences on various aspects of Guatemalan life.
The Service Learning Program: for those who wish to learn Spanish in the context of voluntary work.
Voluntary Internships: both in Social Projects and as an International Co-ordination Assistant. More information about these can be found on our website.
As a non profit-making organization, we rely heavily on independent sources of promotion and would therefore greatly appreciate your displaying of this letter, trifold and poster in an appropriate place. Thank you for taking the time to read this and in anticipation of your immensely important support.
If you would like to receive more information about our organization, please visit our website at www.inepas.org or contact us at info@inepas.org   
Transparent-Facebook-Logo-Icon   Twitter (1)
Yours Sincerely,
 
María Antonieta Ixcoteyac Velásquez,
General Coordinator, INEPAS

 

Behind Alex Cuba’s Canada Day performance in Wit’suwet’in

Posted on Updated on

‘I’m digging into the roots of my adopted land,’ says Cuban-Canadian songwriter

By Andrew Kurjata, CBC News Posted: Jul 01, 2016 7:00 AM PT Last Updated: Jul 01, 2016 7:00 AM PT

Cuban-Canadian singer Alex Cuba had the lyrics of one of his songs translated into the Wit'suwet'in language for a Canada Day performance on Parliament Hill.

Cuban-Canadian singer Alex Cuba had the lyrics of one of his songs translated into the Wit’suwet’in language for a Canada Day performance on Parliament Hill. (Alex Cuba photo: Paul Darrow/Reuters; Lyrics photo: Alex Cuba/Facebook)

When Cuban-born singer Alex Cuba takes the national stage for a performance on Parliament Hill this Canada Day, he’ll be showcasing the language of his adopted home — and it isn’t English or French.

Instead, the Juno and Grammy-award winning artist will be performing a verse from his song Directo in Wit’suwet’in, an Athabaskan language spoken by First Nations in northwest British Columbia.

Cuba says the performance is his way of paying tribute to his adopted home, the small town of Smithers in northern B.C.

“I have roots in that part of Canada now,” he said. “I made Smithers my home for over 13 years now, and my kids, they are growing in Smithers.”

“I’m basically digging into the roots of my adopted land.”

From Spanish to English to Wit’suwet’in

Ron Austin

Northwest coast artist Ron Austin (T’sek’ot) translated lyrics from English to Wit’suwet’in. (Northwest Community College)

The lyrics were translated by Ron Austin (T’sek’ot), an artist and hereditary chief living in nearby Moricetown.

First, Cuba had to translate the words from Spanish to English. Then, Austin got to work adapting them to Wit’suwet’in.

“I had to search for some words like ‘hopelessness,’ because in our language it’s said almost like a sentence,” the chief said. The closest he could come was the phrase, “My heart is in confusion.”

“It’s a more expressive language.”

Endangered language takes national stage

It was during this collaboration that Cuba discovered the deeper significance of the project.

Alex Cuba Director lyrics in Wit'suwet'in

The lyrics of Alex Cuba’s song ‘Directo’ translated into Wit’suwet’in, along with handwritten notes. (Alex Cuba/Facebook)

There are only a few fluent Wit’suwet’in speakers left: somewhere between 70 and 200.

Austin says when he was growing up, children spoke nothing but Wit’suwet’in. That changed when he was sent to a Catholic day school.

“We were not allowed to practice our language and not allowed to speak any native language without being disciplined. Now you see our children around the village, all they do is speak English.”

Cuba says hearing this reaffirmed his commitment to learning the verse.

“It became more clear to me, what if I can do this on national television? … I am honoured to be able to do my little bit to help save this language.”

Read More…

Summer Institute Programs for BC Teachers

Posted on

2016 Summer Institute Programs for BC Teachers

pdce.educ.ubc.ca/workshops-institutes

 

Focus on: INCLUSIVE LEARNING, INQUIRY & SELF-REGULATED LEARNING

SRL INQUIRY HUB – Developing Self-Regulating Learners in Inclusive Classrooms

non-credit program

Begins July 4 | UBC Vancouver

Apply by May 23

 

PRACTICAL INQUIRY AND INNOVATION FRAMEWORDS for School and District Teams

non-credit program

Begins July 8 | UBC Vancouver

Apply by May 26

 

SUPPORTING IMMIGRANT & REFUGEE STUDENTS IN SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY SETTINGS

non-credit program

Begins August 22 | UBC Vancouver

Apply by July 11

 

CREATING THE FUTURE: PARTNERSHIPS FOR INCLUSIVE LEARNING

non-credit program

Begins August 22 | UBC Vancouver

Apply by July 11

 

 

>> The full list of summer learning programs is available at:  http://pdce.educ.ubc.ca/workshops-institutes

 

M.ED. COHORT WITH A FOCUS ON SELF-REGULATED LEARNING

SRL2 Information Session

Wednesday, April 9 | Delta Manor Education Centre

4:00 ­ 6:00pm

 

 

In addition to these programs, below are some non-credit events may be of interest for your professional learning this summer.

NON-CREDIT PROGRAMS

GOING PUBLIC: BUILDING CAPACITY FOR KNOWLEDGE TRANSLATION THROUGH THE MEDIA

Begins May 30 | UBC Vancouver (blended in-person & online)

Apply by April 18

 

CRITICAL DIGITAL LITERACY: ISSUES, CHALLENGES, DIRECTIONS

Begins July 25 | UBC Vancouver

Apply by May 30

 

FRENCH IMMERSION SUMMER INSTITUTES

July | UBC Vancouver & Robson Square

 

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING, new BC coding curriculum

July 4-15 | UBC Vancouver

 

Anishinaabe cook uses language to teach about traditional food

Posted on

By Waubgeshig Rice, CBC News Posted: Jan 29, 2016 4:28 PM ET

dan-kimewonDan Kimewon uses Anishinaabemowin to teach cooking and healthy living.

Diabetes epidemic among indigenous Canadians, say front-line workers
Culture night hits home at Ottawa’s Wabano Centre
An Anishinaabe cook is using his indigenous language and knowledge of traditional foods to teach people about culture and healthy eating at the Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health.

Dan Kimewon, from Saugeen First Nation in southern Ontario, is in Ottawa this weekend to talk Anishinaabemowin (also known as the Ojibway language) with community members, lead cooking classes, and share his experiences of growing up with traditional Anishinaabe teachings about growing and preparing food.

Wabano
The Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health’s community kitchen is a weekly event. (Waubgeshig Rice/CBC News)

“I’m here to teach about a healthy way of life, and how to cook in a healthy way,” said Kimewon, following a lesson with the Wabano diabetes program’s community kitchen, where people learn how to make healthy food options to manage diabetes.

He encourages people to move away from diets of processed and fast foods in hopes of curbing high rates of diabetes and obesity among indigenous people.

“We’ve got so many native people that are sick from this, and we’ve got to understand that,” he said.

Instead, he wants people to embrace more traditional indigenous foods like corn, also known as “mandamin” in Anishinaabemowin. He demonstrates how to prepare corn for soup and other meals in his presentations.

“[Corn] is a way of life of our people,” he said. “It never came from overseas. It’s from here. We’ve always had it.” Read More…