language revitalization

Resource – Mi’kmaq manuscript online

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The Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library is pleased to announce that we have acquired and digitized a rare 19th century Mi’kmaq (Micmac) liturgical manuscript. The prayers are written chiefly in hieroglyphic script, with a few lines including interlinear transliteration in Latin script. Full resolution JPEG images of this extraordinary document are available from Beinecke’s digital library. Images are openly and freely accessible:
A record for this manuscript can be found in Yale’s online library catalog, Orbis:
We are excited to offer this new resource for the study of Mi’kmaq language and culture.
___________________________________
Lisa Conathan
Head of Digital Services Unit
Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library
P.O. Box 208330
New Haven, CT 06520-8240
203.432.9039

Six Nations Polytechnic now offers indigenous language degree

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Six Nations Polytechnic now offers indigenous language degree
Students to be able to get a degree in Ogwehoweh (Cayuga and Mohawk) languages, not just diploma
CBC News Posted: Feb 08, 2016 3:46 PM ET Last Updated: Feb 08, 2016 3:46 PM ET

Ontario’s Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities announced that Six Nations Polytechnic Aboriginal Institute will be able to grant a degree, not just a diploma, in Ogwehoweh languages.

Students will now be able to receive a Bachelor of Arts degree, not just a diploma, in Ogwehoweh languages from the Six Nations Polytechnic Aboriginal Institute in Ohsweken, the province announced today.

It’s the first time the province has allowed an Aboriginal Institute, which are run and governed completely by indigenous leaders, to offer a degree program.

The news lines up with a recommendation from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission — that post-secondary institutions create degree programs in indigenous languages.

Reza Moridi, the province’s Minister of Training, Colleges and Universities, says the change allows several things to happen:

Helps promote and protect Ogwehoweh (Cayuga and Mohawk) languages.
Makes it possible for students to complete their degree at one institution, closer to home.
Helps students build on language and cultural knowledge and skills.
Expands student opportunities for jobs.
“Language preservation and protection are at the core values of Six Nations Polytechnic,” said Rebecca Jamieson, the school’s president, in a press release.

The current diploma program has been offered in partnership with McMaster University.

In the below photo, Six Nations Polytechnic president Rebecca Jamieson is holding a small replica of a drum. Ministers Reza Moridi and David Zimmer are holding a replica of the Covenant Chain wampum belt given by the school to “commemorate the friendships created,” according to Chelsey Johnson, communications director for the school.

Rick Hill, in the middle, is a senior coordinator at the Deyohaha:ge Indigenous Knowledge Centre, and he was holding a replica of the Two Row wampum belt.

Anishinaabe cook uses language to teach about traditional food

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By Waubgeshig Rice, CBC News Posted: Jan 29, 2016 4:28 PM ET

dan-kimewonDan Kimewon uses Anishinaabemowin to teach cooking and healthy living.

Diabetes epidemic among indigenous Canadians, say front-line workers
Culture night hits home at Ottawa’s Wabano Centre
An Anishinaabe cook is using his indigenous language and knowledge of traditional foods to teach people about culture and healthy eating at the Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health.

Dan Kimewon, from Saugeen First Nation in southern Ontario, is in Ottawa this weekend to talk Anishinaabemowin (also known as the Ojibway language) with community members, lead cooking classes, and share his experiences of growing up with traditional Anishinaabe teachings about growing and preparing food.

Wabano
The Wabano Centre for Aboriginal Health’s community kitchen is a weekly event. (Waubgeshig Rice/CBC News)

“I’m here to teach about a healthy way of life, and how to cook in a healthy way,” said Kimewon, following a lesson with the Wabano diabetes program’s community kitchen, where people learn how to make healthy food options to manage diabetes.

He encourages people to move away from diets of processed and fast foods in hopes of curbing high rates of diabetes and obesity among indigenous people.

“We’ve got so many native people that are sick from this, and we’ve got to understand that,” he said.

Instead, he wants people to embrace more traditional indigenous foods like corn, also known as “mandamin” in Anishinaabemowin. He demonstrates how to prepare corn for soup and other meals in his presentations.

“[Corn] is a way of life of our people,” he said. “It never came from overseas. It’s from here. We’ve always had it.” Read More…

Public Lecture by Daryl Baldwin on February 22 – “Feature Speakers” Lecture Series. 11:30am, Feb 22, 2016

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We are delighted to announce that Daryl Baldwin is the next guest in the Future Speakers lecture series supported by the Dean of Arts. 

Daryl Baldwin is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma, and Director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. His lecture, entitled “toopeeliyankwi, kati myaamiaataweeyankwi: We Succeed At Speaking The Myaamia Language,” will take place on Monday, February 22 at 11:30am in the Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall at the First Nations Longhouse. A free catered lunch will follow his talk at 1pm.
We would be grateful if you could help promote this event through your networks. We’ve attached the poster and digital signage.

Best regards,
The Faculty and Staff at the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program



The Museum of Anthropology, the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program, the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program, the Department of Linguistics, and the Department of Anthropology present a new lecture series supported by the Dean of Arts, and in partnership with the First Nations House of Learning and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, to spark a conversation about the futures of Indigenous languages in the 21st century.

Future Speakers” highlights both the struggles and the successes of Indigenous language revitalization and looks to a future where these languages are not only spoken, but thrive. The Museum of Anthropology, the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program, the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program, the Department of Linguistics, and the Department of Anthropology present a new lecture series supported by the Dean of Arts, and in partnership with the First Nations House of Learning and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, to spark a conversation about the futures of Indigenous languages in the 21st century.

Skwomesh language activist to launch ‘trailblazing’ immersion course at B.C. university

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Students to be taught indigenous language 5 days a week at Simon Fraser University

By Duncan McCue, CBC News Posted: Jan 14, 2016 6:38 PM ETLast Updated: Jan 15, 2016 11:36 AM ET

"My heart just soars when I have opportunities to speak to others in my language. Right now, I don't have enough people," says 26-year-old Khelsilem.

“My heart just soars when I have opportunities to speak to others in my language. Right now, I don’t have enough people,” says 26-year-old Khelsilem. (Kwi Awt Stelmexw)

A young man’s determined efforts to revive his ancestral language — which started with grassroots language nights in his father’s home five years ago — reached a new milestone this week with the announcement that he’ll be leading a full-time adult immersion program for the Skwomesh language at Simon Fraser University in September.

“My heart just soars when I have opportunities to speak to others in my language. Right now, I don’t have enough people,” says 26-year-old Khelsilem (his traditional Skwomesh name).

The program would like to have 15 students learning Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim (the 7 represents a glottal stop or a slight pause) — or in English, the Skwomesh language — seven hours a day, five days a week.

Khelsilem teaching

Khelsilem will be one of two lead instructors of an innovative indigenous language program at Simon Fraser University, which is now accepting applicants. (Kwi Awt Stelmexw)

Khelsilem will be one of two lead instructors of the program, which is now accepting applicants. After completing 1,000 classroom hours, students graduate with a certificate in First Nations language proficiency.

It’s modeled after similar indigenous language programs in Canada and New Zealand. Khelsilem says he was inspired by a trip to the community of Kahnawake in Quebec, where he learned about Mohawk immersion efforts.

“I was able to see how many years of running an adult immersion program has created a community of language speakers … that permeates through many institutions in the community, whether schools, community centres, hospital, daycares or administrative centres,” says Khelsilem.

“When I saw that, it was clear to me what was really needed in my community.”

The Squamish Nation has a population of 4,000 members with a vast traditional territory that ranges from North Vancouver to the city of Squamish, 60 kilometres north of Vancouver.

But a 2014 report on the status of B.C. First Nations languages listed Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim as “critically endangered,” with only seven fluent speakers remaining.

Immersion-based approach

Until now, the options for Squamish Nation members interested in learning the language have been limited to Skwomesh classes in local elementary and high schools. There are also evening classes for adult learners, which are university-accredited but sporadic. Khelsilem says a few hours a week of language instruction can’t turn a student into a language speaker.

“You might become knowledgeable in aspects of the language, but it won’t make you into a conversational speaker that can talk to fluent speakers, or describe events, people and locations.”

Marianne Ignace

“It’s a trail-blazing project (in British Columbia),” says Professor Marianne Ignace, director of SFU’s First Nations Language Centre. (SFU)

Professor Marianne Ignace, the director of SFU’s First Nations Language Centre, believes the Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim immersion project has exciting prospects for revitalizing the language.

It’s a trailblazing project (in British Columbia),” says Ignace, a community member of the Skeetchesen First Nation and fluent speaker of secwepemctsin.

“We know in our hearts it’s nearly impossible for somebody who studies their First Nations language at the pace of two to three hours a week — and they need to pump in 1,000 hours to get good at it.”

SFU has certified over 200 students in 15 indigenous languages over the past two decades, says Ignace but only recently began offering opportunities to learn in immersion settings.

The centre ran a four-month immersion “boot-camp” for the Haida language in Haida Gwaii last winter. It’s also piloting a “language house” project with the Osoyoos First Nation and Penticton Indian Band, immersing 15 students in the Okanagan language, known as nsyilxcen, for two-days per week.

“We can see how much faster learners are able to progress, if it’s the full-time immersion based approach,” says Ignace.

“It’s hard to sustain that energy, but we’re losing our elders so fast. We’re in a desperate situation to produce intermediate and advanced speakers as fast as we can.”

Funding indigenous language learning

Khelsilem, a semi-fluent speaker of Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim, began learning from cassette tapes as a teenager. Once he became more proficient, he launched an online language blog in 2011, designed to reach and teach Squamish Nation members in any location with his self-designed podcasts and YouTube videos.

That evolved into a Language House, where three residents lived and spoke Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim daily.

Khelsilem 'language house'

Khelsilem was once part of ‘Language House,’ where three residents lived and spoke Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim daily. (Duncan McCue)

All these efforts were do-it-yourself volunteer affairs, supplemented with contributions from crowdfunding campaigns. But Khelsilem says he recognizes the key to developing a community of language speakers is to make it financially viable for language students.

“A couple ofpost community members have indicated their boss would give them a year leave of absence to take the program, but they won’t be earning income during that time. We want to make language learning financially accessible to people.”

The partnership with Simon Fraser University means students who are First Nation members will be eligible to apply for post-secondary funding to cover tuition costs, as well as a monthly living allowance.

Khelsilem has founded a not-for-profit organization called Kwi Awt Stelmexw, hoping to raise $30,000 for student scholarships, and plans to hold a gala fundraiser this March in North Vancouver.

Reference:

(2016, January 18) Skwomesh language activist to launch ‘trailblazing’ immersion course at B.C. university. CBC News. Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/skwomesh-language-activist-b-c-university-launch-immersion-course-1.3404541?__vfz=tc%3D1m3KDoFKsn9

Job – Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream – Haudenosaunee Language and Culture, U of T. Due Jan 22, 2016

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A detailed description of the job posting can be found on the U of T Careers webpage: https://utoronto.taleo.net/careersection/10050/jobdetail.ftl?job=1501652

 

 

Requisition Title: Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream – Haudenosaunee Language and Culture  1501652

Job Field: Teaching Stream

Faculty / Division: Faculty of Arts and Science

Department: Linguistics

Campus: St. George (downtown Toronto)

Job Posting: Nov 27, 2015

Job Closing: JAN 22, 2016

 

Description:

The Centre for Aboriginal Initiatives and the Department of Linguistics (St. George campus) invite applications for a continuing full-time teaching stream appointment in the area of Haudenosaunee (Iroquoian) language and culture. The appointment is at the rank of Assistant Professor, Teaching Stream and will commence on July 1, 2016.

 

Qualifications include a record of excellence in teaching and fluency or near fluency in an Iroquoian language, with experience in teaching the language in a university setting. Knowledge of historical and contemporary Aboriginal (First Nations, Inuit, Metis) issues, including spiritual beliefs, traditions, culture, politics, history, values and language is also necessary. Community engagement and participation in language vitalization initiatives is desirable. Evidence of excellence in teaching is demonstrated by a strong statement of teaching philosophy, teaching accomplishments, and endorsements from referees.

 

Duties include teaching and supervision at the undergraduate level, working with students, and participating in the language programs in the Centre for Aboriginal Initiatives.

 

All qualified candidates are invited to apply online by clicking on the link below. Applications should include a cover letter, a curriculum vitae, evidence of teaching ability (including a statement of teaching philosophy), and the names and email addresses of three referees who will submit letters of reference to support your application. Please combine your application into one or two files. If you have any questions about this position, please email the contact address below.

 

All application materials should be submitted online and received by January 22, 2016.

 

Submission guidelines can be found at http://uoft.me/how-to-apply.

 

Applicants should arrange to have three letters of reference sent directly to the Director, Centre for Aboriginal Initiatives via email to aboriginal.studies@utoronto.ca  with the subject line “Haudenosaunee – (your full name)’ by the job deadline date of January 22, 2016.

 

Inquiries should be directed to aboriginal.studies@utoronto.ca.

 

For more information about the Centre for Aboriginal Initiatives, see http://aboriginalstudies.utoronto.ca, and for more information about the Department of Linguistics, see http://linguistics.utoronto.ca/.

 

The University of Toronto is strongly committed to diversity within its community and especially welcomes applications from visible minority groups, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, members of sexual minority groups, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas.

 

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.