language

Faculty of Education Vancouver Summer Program – Employment and Volunteer Opportunities. Due: June 17, 2016

Posted on

The Faculty of Education will be running three packages (LLED, ECPS, and Early Childhood Education) as part of the Vancouver Summer Program. PDCE is supporting the administration of this program and we are looking to hire 2 Cultural Exchange Student Ambassadors and 10-15 Cultural Exchange Volunteers.

Further information: http://pdce.educ.ubc.ca/vancouver-summer-program

Cultural Exchange Student Ambassadors will support the Vancouver Summer Program. They will assist in the planning and facilitation of orientation and social activities for visiting students on behalf of the Faculty of Education, help students orient and adapt to studies at UBC, and provide a supportive atmosphere for students while they are in Vancouver. The incumbent will work closely with the Cultural Coordinator and the Professional Development & Community Engagement (PDCE) unit within the UBC Faculty of Education. The position reports directly to the Manager of Professional Programs in PDCE.

Duties & Responsibilities: Assisting with the planning and facilitation of orientation and social activities. Assist with airport pick-up and residence check-in when students arrive (July 14-17). Attend and facilitate Orientation (July 18 all day), and evening and weekend social activities. In conjunction with the Cultural Coordinator, liaise with other faculties and external units including catering services, entertainment venues, transportation companies, and building facility managers. Assist with the development of a template for future program implementation.

Wage: $22/hour

Deadline: June 17, 2016

Apply: Submit cover letter and résumé to Andrea Webb andrea.webb@ubc.ca or in person to PDCE office

Cultural Exchange Volunteers will be working closely with the Faculty of Education’s Cultural Exchange Students Ambassadors and the Cultural Coordinator to provide visiting students with a fun, safe, supportive, and meaningful exchange experience.  Cultural Exchange Volunteers will engage with VSP students by encouraging participation in a range of social and cultural activities, and supporting them throughout their orientation and transition to UBC and Vancouver.

Duties & Responsibilities: Attend a mandatory orientation and training session, attend and assist with welcoming activities including but not limited to residence check in, campus tours, city tours, and orientations events, attend and engage VSP students at various social and cultural events on evenings, weekends, and some weekdays, assist the VSP staff in facilitating events.

Hours per week: 5 – 15

Apply: email cover letter, résumé, and unofficial transcript addressed to Renae Roles; r.roles@alumni.ubc.ca

 

Public Lecture by Daryl Baldwin on February 22 – “Feature Speakers” Lecture Series. 11:30am, Feb 22, 2016

Posted on

We are delighted to announce that Daryl Baldwin is the next guest in the Future Speakers lecture series supported by the Dean of Arts. 

Daryl Baldwin is a citizen of the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma, and Director of the Myaamia Center at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. His lecture, entitled “toopeeliyankwi, kati myaamiaataweeyankwi: We Succeed At Speaking The Myaamia Language,” will take place on Monday, February 22 at 11:30am in the Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall at the First Nations Longhouse. A free catered lunch will follow his talk at 1pm.
We would be grateful if you could help promote this event through your networks. We’ve attached the poster and digital signage.

Best regards,
The Faculty and Staff at the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program



The Museum of Anthropology, the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program, the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program, the Department of Linguistics, and the Department of Anthropology present a new lecture series supported by the Dean of Arts, and in partnership with the First Nations House of Learning and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, to spark a conversation about the futures of Indigenous languages in the 21st century.

Future Speakers” highlights both the struggles and the successes of Indigenous language revitalization and looks to a future where these languages are not only spoken, but thrive. The Museum of Anthropology, the First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program, the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program, the Department of Linguistics, and the Department of Anthropology present a new lecture series supported by the Dean of Arts, and in partnership with the First Nations House of Learning and the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, to spark a conversation about the futures of Indigenous languages in the 21st century.

Skwomesh language activist to launch ‘trailblazing’ immersion course at B.C. university

Posted on Updated on

Students to be taught indigenous language 5 days a week at Simon Fraser University

By Duncan McCue, CBC News Posted: Jan 14, 2016 6:38 PM ETLast Updated: Jan 15, 2016 11:36 AM ET

"My heart just soars when I have opportunities to speak to others in my language. Right now, I don't have enough people," says 26-year-old Khelsilem.

“My heart just soars when I have opportunities to speak to others in my language. Right now, I don’t have enough people,” says 26-year-old Khelsilem. (Kwi Awt Stelmexw)

A young man’s determined efforts to revive his ancestral language — which started with grassroots language nights in his father’s home five years ago — reached a new milestone this week with the announcement that he’ll be leading a full-time adult immersion program for the Skwomesh language at Simon Fraser University in September.

“My heart just soars when I have opportunities to speak to others in my language. Right now, I don’t have enough people,” says 26-year-old Khelsilem (his traditional Skwomesh name).

The program would like to have 15 students learning Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim (the 7 represents a glottal stop or a slight pause) — or in English, the Skwomesh language — seven hours a day, five days a week.

Khelsilem teaching

Khelsilem will be one of two lead instructors of an innovative indigenous language program at Simon Fraser University, which is now accepting applicants. (Kwi Awt Stelmexw)

Khelsilem will be one of two lead instructors of the program, which is now accepting applicants. After completing 1,000 classroom hours, students graduate with a certificate in First Nations language proficiency.

It’s modeled after similar indigenous language programs in Canada and New Zealand. Khelsilem says he was inspired by a trip to the community of Kahnawake in Quebec, where he learned about Mohawk immersion efforts.

“I was able to see how many years of running an adult immersion program has created a community of language speakers … that permeates through many institutions in the community, whether schools, community centres, hospital, daycares or administrative centres,” says Khelsilem.

“When I saw that, it was clear to me what was really needed in my community.”

The Squamish Nation has a population of 4,000 members with a vast traditional territory that ranges from North Vancouver to the city of Squamish, 60 kilometres north of Vancouver.

But a 2014 report on the status of B.C. First Nations languages listed Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim as “critically endangered,” with only seven fluent speakers remaining.

Immersion-based approach

Until now, the options for Squamish Nation members interested in learning the language have been limited to Skwomesh classes in local elementary and high schools. There are also evening classes for adult learners, which are university-accredited but sporadic. Khelsilem says a few hours a week of language instruction can’t turn a student into a language speaker.

“You might become knowledgeable in aspects of the language, but it won’t make you into a conversational speaker that can talk to fluent speakers, or describe events, people and locations.”

Marianne Ignace

“It’s a trail-blazing project (in British Columbia),” says Professor Marianne Ignace, director of SFU’s First Nations Language Centre. (SFU)

Professor Marianne Ignace, the director of SFU’s First Nations Language Centre, believes the Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim immersion project has exciting prospects for revitalizing the language.

It’s a trailblazing project (in British Columbia),” says Ignace, a community member of the Skeetchesen First Nation and fluent speaker of secwepemctsin.

“We know in our hearts it’s nearly impossible for somebody who studies their First Nations language at the pace of two to three hours a week — and they need to pump in 1,000 hours to get good at it.”

SFU has certified over 200 students in 15 indigenous languages over the past two decades, says Ignace but only recently began offering opportunities to learn in immersion settings.

The centre ran a four-month immersion “boot-camp” for the Haida language in Haida Gwaii last winter. It’s also piloting a “language house” project with the Osoyoos First Nation and Penticton Indian Band, immersing 15 students in the Okanagan language, known as nsyilxcen, for two-days per week.

“We can see how much faster learners are able to progress, if it’s the full-time immersion based approach,” says Ignace.

“It’s hard to sustain that energy, but we’re losing our elders so fast. We’re in a desperate situation to produce intermediate and advanced speakers as fast as we can.”

Funding indigenous language learning

Khelsilem, a semi-fluent speaker of Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim, began learning from cassette tapes as a teenager. Once he became more proficient, he launched an online language blog in 2011, designed to reach and teach Squamish Nation members in any location with his self-designed podcasts and YouTube videos.

That evolved into a Language House, where three residents lived and spoke Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim daily.

Khelsilem 'language house'

Khelsilem was once part of ‘Language House,’ where three residents lived and spoke Sk̲wx̱wú7mesh sníchim daily. (Duncan McCue)

All these efforts were do-it-yourself volunteer affairs, supplemented with contributions from crowdfunding campaigns. But Khelsilem says he recognizes the key to developing a community of language speakers is to make it financially viable for language students.

“A couple ofpost community members have indicated their boss would give them a year leave of absence to take the program, but they won’t be earning income during that time. We want to make language learning financially accessible to people.”

The partnership with Simon Fraser University means students who are First Nation members will be eligible to apply for post-secondary funding to cover tuition costs, as well as a monthly living allowance.

Khelsilem has founded a not-for-profit organization called Kwi Awt Stelmexw, hoping to raise $30,000 for student scholarships, and plans to hold a gala fundraiser this March in North Vancouver.

Reference:

(2016, January 18) Skwomesh language activist to launch ‘trailblazing’ immersion course at B.C. university. CBC News. Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/skwomesh-language-activist-b-c-university-launch-immersion-course-1.3404541?__vfz=tc%3D1m3KDoFKsn9

Why Native poets, and their languages, are so often misunderstood

Posted on Updated on

Why Native poets, and their languages, are so often misunderstood

by Corinne Segal  November 23, 2015 at 11:20 AM EST

landscape_copyright_BrianAdams-1024x575.jpg
Poet Joan Naviyuk Kane. Photo by Brian Adams

Alaskan Native poet Joan Naviyuk Kane’s poems grow from one word.

In the case of the poem “Compass,” that word is “Uaałukitaaqtuq,” an Inupiaq word that describes the feeling of being “in a boat, and the waves are rocking you back and forth,” Kane said.

Kane writes in Inupiaq, one of the languages spoken by the Native Alaskan people. Many of her poems are inspired by the sound or feel of one word; then, she “build[s] the poem, either through sonic value or tone or emotional value, or intellectual resonances that come up through language,” she said. Kane, who lives in Anchorage, Alaska, often asks her mother, who taught her and her sons Inupiaq, to suggest certain words or phrases.

The act of writing in a Native language is one tool against the misconceptions that exist about Native people in the U.S. — those that do not account for the reality of diverse, thriving Native cultures, she said.

“There is something that is very troublesome to me about … playing into this continued exoticization or fetishization of the Native person as a relic of the past, as a romantic figure, as something outdated or very other,” she said. “Native people from very different parts of the United States are expected to have similarities because we happened to be colonized by the same government — there’s something problematic there.”

The work that Native artists produce speaks to the diversity of Native people in the U.S., she said. “In Alaska, we still call ourselves Eskimo people. We’re very different, culturally, linguistically, socially, geographically, than what people consider the American Indian population,” she said.

“Compass” began as an exploration of her mother’s relationship with her sons. But “it became instead, like many of my poems, a more terrifying psychological exploration of what it means to be a woman,” she said.

The poem outlines the speaker’s physical reality in short declarations, a linguistic pattern that which Kane said reflects her understanding of Inupiaq. Read more…

Job – Assistant Professor, Spanish and Spanish American Studies, Due: Nov. 15, 2015

Posted on

Assistant Professor, Spanish and Spanish American Studies

About Mills College:

Located in Oakland, California, in the heart of the San Francisco Bay Area, Mills College is a nationally renowned independent liberal arts college for women with graduate programs for women and men.  Ranked one of the top-tier regional universities in the West by U.S. News & World Report, Mills is also recognized as one of The Best 380 Colleges in the nation by The Princeton Review.  Since 1852 we’ve been empowering students to become creative, independent thinkers who take and inspire action. For more information, visit http://www.mills.edu.


Job Description:

The Department of Languages and Literatures [DLL] invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor position in the Spanish and Spanish American Studies Program [SSAS] to begin Fall 2016.

We seek an engaged scholar with a demonstrated commitment to teaching, advising undergraduate students, and cutting edge research. The successful candidate will teach all levels of Spanish language, including specialized courses, such as Spanish for Heritage Speakers and Translation. In addition, the candidate will teach classes in culture, film and literature. The successful candidate will also direct the Language Club, co-supervise undergraduate research by SSAS Majors, contribute to the Spanish and Spanish American Studies program and particularly to the discipline of Latin American and Latino(a) Literature, play an active role in departmental and College service, and maintain an active research agenda.


Requirements:

Evidence of excellence in teaching, demonstrated knowledge of current trends in pedagogy, critical theory, and new technologies necessary. Candidates are expected to have a Ph.D in hand at the time of appointment, native or near-native fluency in Spanish and English, and a commitment to the education of undergraduate students.


Additional Information:

Women and other traditionally underrepresented groups are encouraged to apply. Mills College seeks to recruit and retain a diverse workforce as a reflection of our commitment to diversity and our desire to maintain the excellence of our faculty. In so doing, we offer our students not only the opportunity to learn about varied disciplines, but to engage diverse perspectives, and ways of knowing and learning.

Mills College does not permit discrimination based on pregnancy, childbirth or related medical conditions, race, religious creed, color, national origin or ancestry, physical or mental disability, medical condition, marital status, age, sex, sexual orientation, or gender identity.   For more information on Mills’ non-discrimination policy, pleased go to:
http://www.mills.edu/administration/administrative_offices/policies/nondiscrimination.php


Application Instructions:

Please submit:

  • Cover letter
  • Curriculum vitae
  • Contact information for three references
  • A teaching statement outlining candidate’s approach to teaching
  • Teaching evaluations
  • Writing samples

To receive full consideration, applications must be received by November 15, 2015. Inquiries may be addressed to SpanishSearch@mills.edu.

CFP – Canadian Journal for New Scholars in Education, Due June 1, 2015

Posted on

CJNSE Fall 2015 Special Issue

Language, Identity, and Diversity in Education 

This is a call for submissions for a Fall 2015 special issue of the Canadian Journal for New Scholars in Education. This special issue is broadly dedicated to issues surrounding language, identity, and diversity in Education and will be guest co-edited by the journal’s newest faculty advisory editor, Dr. Antoinette Gagné. The CJNSE welcomes and encourages submissions describing original (MA or PhD) research but may also accept position papers and book reviews from new scholars. Submissions are welcomed in our journal’s two official languages, English and French. Submissions will be accepted starting immediately with a deadline of June 21st, 2015. Submissions will go through our journal’s extensive peer-review and editing process. Questions and queries may be sent to CJNSE editor James Corcoran (English) at cjnse.rcjce.journal@gmail.comor Nancy Allen (French) at directricesrcjce@hotmail.com

RCJCE, numéro thématique, automne

Langue, identité et diversité en éducation


Le numéro thématique de l’automne 2015 de la Revue canadienne des jeunes 

chercheurs-chercheuses en éducation portera sur la langue (au sens large), le 

développement identitaire qui peut y être associé de même que sur la diversité et la pluralité des langues. Nous sommes heureux d’avoir à nos côtés, pour mener à bien ce numéro, Antoinette Gagné, professeure associée à l’Université de Toronto. La RCJCE encourage la publication d’articles inédits (MA ou PHD), en anglais ou en français, traitant de recherches en cours ou complétées. La RCJCE accepte aussi des articles d’opinions ou des recensions d’écrits scientifiques. Les propositions d’articles seront acceptées jusqu’au 21 juin 2015. Pour tous commentaires ou questions concernant ce numéro thématique, nous vous invitons à écrire à la directrice du volet francophone, Nancy Allen, directricesrcjce@hotmail.com ou au directeur du volet anglophone, James Corcoran cjnse.rcjce.journal@gmail.com