law

The BC Infant and Early Childhood Court Team (IECCT) Conference – May 15 – 16, 2017

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Judges and lawyers routinely face making life-altering, best interest decisions about infants and young children who have experienced significant adverse experiences and are at risk for devastating long-term outcomes. This conference is a unique opportunity to learn from and engage with internationally-recognized experts (including judges, lawyers, and infant mental health clinicians) from evidence-based court teams developed in the USA. Working together we will build on and adapt these model programs for implementation in the Canadian context and, in British Columbia, to create the BC Infant and Early Childhood Court Teams (IEECTs).
 
A limited number of tuition bursaries to partially cover registration fees are available for professionals and service providers working with children and families who would otherwise not be in a position to attend.
 
Date: May 15 – 16, 2017
Location: Coast Plaza Hotel and Suites, Vancouver
 
Early bird registration deadline: April 7, 2017

 

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Indigenous Resurgence in an Age of Reconciliation, Pre-symposium and Symposium events – March 15-18, 2017.

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Pre-Symposium Event: Landsdowne Lecture with Leanne Betasamosake Simpson

March 15th 5:00 pm, First Peoples House, Ceremonial Hall

Hosted by the Department of Political Science

Freedom Sings: Land/Bodies/Resurgence

This talk will explore Indigenous resurgence and nationhood through story, song and video. Leanne will discuss resurgence as an ongoing intervention into the colonial project by sharing works from her recent album f(l)ight (RPM Records), her new book of short stories This Accident of Being Lost (House of Anansi) and her forthcoming academic work on the The Radical Resurgence Project (UMP Press). More information about Leanne Simpson.

See poster

Symposium: Indigenous Resurgence in an Age of Reconciliation March 15-18, 2017

  • This symposium will bring together many prominent Indigenous scholars in the fields of Political Science, Law and Indigenous Governance to consider the long intellectual tradition of Indigenous resurgence within these fields while looking toward new directions in consideration of the challenges and possibilities produced in the era of reconciliation. The aim in hosting this event is to cultivate an environment for productive discussion of a central concern facing Indigenous resurgence: our relationships with creation (land, water, animals, ancestors) and how these relationships have been impacted by reconciliation politics.

Speakers: Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Heidi Kiiwetinepinesiik Stark, Dian Million, Sheryl Lightfoot, Christine O’Bonsawin, Taiaiake Alfred, Glen Coulthard, Sarah Hunt, Aimee Craft, Audra Simpson, Hayden King, Nick Claxton, Hokulani Aikau, Daniel Heath Justice. This event will take place at the University of Victoria at the First Peoples House from March 15th to 18th 2017. No registration is required, and the event is free.

More info…

 

Building Legal Colonialism: Liberal Enclosure and Indigenous Self-Determination. 5:30 – 6:30 pm, Jan 10, 2017

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Building Legal Colonialism:
Liberal Enclosure and
Indigenous Self-Determination

An Inaugural Lecture at the
Peter A. Allard School of Law

Professor Gordon Christie’s research focuses on questions of Aboriginal rights. He has published on many of the signal decisions in Canadian Aboriginal law, from Delgamuukw to Tsilhqot’in Nation, and his work explores a broad range of issues, including Aboriginal rights and title, Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination, and processes of consultation and accommodation. As an Indigenous scholar, Professor Christie has been an important voice as well in the development of thinking on Indigenous legal traditions. His most recent project involves an attempt to move beyond the dominant mode of critical analysis with respect to Canadian jurisprudence on Aboriginal rights, which relies on and champions particular, but often conflicting, normative theories of the law to analyse court decisions. His forthcoming book, Making Sense of Aboriginal Rights: An Exercise in Methodological Naturalism, explores the question of how the nature of the law might be theorized in a way that allows for a non-normative description and explanation of the dynamics of Canadian jurisprudence on Aboriginal questions, in terms of the actions of one meaning-generating community—the settler state and its legal institutions—with relation to numerous and varied Indigenous meaning-generating communities.

Professor Christie joined the Allard School of Law at UBC in 2004, serving as Academic Director of the Indigenous Legal Studies Program from 2005 to 2016. Prior to coming to Allard Law he held a faculty appointment at Osgoode Hall Law School (York University), where he was also Director of the Intensive Program in Aboriginal Lands, Resources and Governments. He obtained B.A. in Philosophy from Princeton University, followed by an LL.B. from the University of Victoria and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of California Santa Barbara. At the Allard School of Law, he teaches in the areas of aboriginal law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary perspectives, as well as first-year Torts.

TUESDAY
JAN 10, 2017
5:30 – 6:30PM
Allard Hall,
Franklin Lew Forum
The Inaugural Lecture tradition at the Allard School of Law celebrates the promotion of faculty members to full Professor with a public lecture addressed to the broad themes of their scholarly work.

Reception to follow. Please RSVP
Peter A. Allard School of Law
The University of British Columbia
Allard Hall, 1822 East Mall
Vancouver BC V6T 1Z1
T 604.822.6335
http://www.allard.ubc.ca

Job – Native Courtworker, First Nations Court sittings, Vancouver & New Westminster. Due: Sept 10, 2016

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Job posting for a Native Courtworker to cover Vancouver & New Westminster.

The Native Courtworker would be required to travel to New Westminster once per month to attend First Nations Court sittings.  The position is Monday to Friday 8:30am to 4:30pm.

The closing date is September 10, 2016.

Vancouver Native Courtworker Job Posting – Sept 10 16

29th Annual Indian Law Symposium at UW – Sept 8-9, 2016

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September 8 – 9, 2016
William H. Gates Hall
University of Washington
Seattle, WA

Register

Details

Research Assistant, Project on Water Governance and Indigenous Law at UBC. Due: Sept 9, 2016 (12 pm)

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The student research assistant will support projects for the Project on Water Governance and Indigenous Law, a multi-year SSHRC Partnership Grant.

Position will be approximately 10 hours per week from September to December, with the possibility of extension and further research collaboration.

Job Duties:

  • logistics for partner meetings (accommodation, travel, handouts, room arrangements)
  • taking notes -background research including literature reviews and data base assessment
  • logistics for summer meeting
  • social media
  • support for administrative tasks including copy-editing, network building and data assessment Qualifications
  • interest/knowledge in Aboriginal issues, organizations, and resources
  • a solid work ethic
  • strong research skills
  • excellent computer skills including Office, WordPress, and if possible

    Adobe Creative Suite

  • proven written and verbal communication abilities
  • strong interpersonal and organizational skills
  • an ability and willingness to work independently and on a team
  • accuracy and attention to detail in creating and reviewing documents and databases
  • aptitudes in prioritization and meeting deadlines
  • skill in design and layout

    This position is open to upper year undergraduate and graduate students at UBC.

    Please send your cover letter and resume to water.partners@ubc.ca. Deadline to apply: Noon, Friday, September 9th 2016.

Call for Papers: American Indian Law Review

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Turtle Talk

The American Indian Law Review (AILR) welcomes articles by legal scholars and practitioners in the areas of law relating to Native Americans and indigenous peoples. The American Indian Law Review serves as a nationwide scholarly forum for analysis of developments in legal issues pertaining to Native Americans and indigenous peoples worldwide, and is one of the most cited legal publications in the nation.

Adhering to the traditional law review format, the Review offers in-depth articles by legal scholars, attorneys and other expert observers. The American Indian Law Review is committed to advancing the quality of published scholarship relating to Native Americans and other indigenous peoples. Toward this goal, the Review considers article submissions through an independent, double-blind peer-review process. Publication decisions are based upon objective recommendations from reviewers as well as the student board of editors.

Electronic submissions may be sent in one of two ways: (1) via ExpressO, an electronic…

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