law

Job – Asst. Professor, U of Lethbridge. Due: March 25, 2016

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Job Title Assistant Professor – Native American Studies
Rank Assistant Professor
Tenure Information Tenure Track
Position Details The Department of Native American Studies at the University of Lethbridge invites applications for one tenure track position at the rank of Assistant Professor, beginning July 1, 2016, subject to budgetary approval.

A Ph.D. (or near completion) is required, combined with a strong teaching, research, and publication record in Native American Studies. The area of research is open, with interest in candidates with multidisciplinary backgrounds in Indigenous or traditional knowledge and symbolism; Indigenous pedagogical and ontological perspectives; Aboriginal law, rights, and treaties; First Nations governance; economics; political science; history; or community development. Since Native American Studies faculty are required to teach in a wide variety of areas, candidates with experience and expertise in any one or any combination of the above listed areas will be given preference. Fluency in or knowledge of an Indigenous language is an asset.

The University of Lethbridge hires on the basis of merit and is committed to employment equity and diversity. All qualified persons are encouraged to apply. In accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given preference. Preference will also be given to Aboriginal applicants who meet the requirements of the position: applicants who wish to be considered under this initiative should self-identify in their cover letter. The University aspires to hire individuals who have demonstrated considerable potential for excellence in teaching, research and scholarship, and especially those who have well established research programs.

Located in southern Alberta, near the Rocky Mountains, Lethbridge offers a sunny, dry climate that is surprisingly mild for the prairies, excellent cultural and recreational amenities and attractive economic conditions. Founded in 1967, the University has an enrollment of over 8,000 students. Our focus on liberal education, selected professional programs, smaller classes, co-op placements, and involvement of students in faculty research provides the very best education available. For more information about Native American Studies and the University of Lethbridge please visit our web site at http://www.uleth.ca.

Faculty Faculty of Arts & Science
Campus Lethbridge

Posting Detail Information

Open Date 02/23/2016
Close Date 03/25/2016
Open Until Filled Yes
Special Instructions to Applicants Applications should include a curriculum vitae, transcripts, outlines of courses previously taught, teaching evaluations, publication reprints or preprints, a statement of teaching philosophy, a statement of research interests, and at least three references from scholars in the field. Send these materials, and arrange for the reference letters to be sent directly, electronically to Jessica.goodrider@uleth.ca. Enquiries may be directed to Dr. Muriel Mellow, Acting Chair, Department of Native American Studies, University of Lethbridge, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alberta T1K 3M4.; Telephone: (403) 329-2529, Fax: 403 380-1855, E-mail: muriel.mellow@uleth.ca
Employment Equity The University of Lethbridge hires on the basis of merit and is committed to employment equity and diversity. All qualified persons are encouraged to apply. In accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given preference.

Presentation by the Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada. 10 – 11 am, March 5, 2016

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Presentation by the Honourable Jody Wilson-Raybould, Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada

All students and community members are invited to attend a presentation by the Hon. Jody Wilson-Raybould, Canada’s newest Attorney General, and a graduate of the UBC Allard School of Law, who will be discussing her vision and role as the Minister of Justice.

Saturday, March 5, 10:00-11:00 AM
Jack Poole Hall, The Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre

Please RSVP for this event as seating is limited. Light refreshments will be served.

March 11, 2016: Perspectives on Access to Information – iSchool @ UBC Research Day

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The School of Library, Archival and Information Studies, the iSchool at UBC, invites you to its 6th Annual Research Day on Friday, March 11th, 2016, which showcases the contributions of the iSchool students and faculty working at the intersections of archival, information, library and children’s literature studies. This year, focusing broadly on perspectives on providing access to information.

We are very excited to welcome Peter Hirtle, our keynote speaker, to speak with a specific focus on intellectual property issues. Peter Hirtle is an Affiliate Fellow of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. Until his retirement from Cornell in 2015, he served as Senior Policy Advisor to the Cornell University Library with a special mandate to address intellectual property issues. He is also a contributing author to the LibraryLaw.com blog.

Research Day 2016 Schedule:

Friday, March 11th, 2016,

Keynote and Short Talks: 11.00-1.30pm

Posters and Demos: 1.30-3.00 pm

Where: Golden Jubilee Room (4th floor, Irving K. Barber Learning Centre)

RSVP at: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/ischool-at-ubcs-research-day-2016-tickets-19846745149

More information about Research Day 2016 is available from the iSchool website: http://slais.ubc.ca/research-day-2016-perspectives-on-access-to-information/ and questions about Research Day can be directed to: ischool.researchday@ubc.ca

Globally significant landmark agreement reached

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Globally significant landmark agreement reached

First Nations, environmental groups and coastal forest industry representatives joined the Province today to celebrate achieving ecosystem-based management in the Great Bear Rainforest.

The Great Bear Rainforest was established through land-use decisions announced in 2006. This globally unique area covers 6.4 million hectares on British Columbia’s north and central coast, and is home to 26 separate First Nations. Ecosystem-based management in the area is defined as “concurrent achievement of high levels of ecological integrity and high levels of human well-being.”

Under the new Great Bear Rainforest land-use order, ecological integrity is achieved through increasing the amount of protected old-growth forest to 70% from 50%. As well, eight new special forest management areas covering almost 295,000 hectares will be off-limits to logging. Six may receive additional protection based on ongoing discussions with First Nations. With the new measures, 85% of the forest will be protected and 15% will be available for logging, supporting local jobs.

The land-use order also addresses First Nations’ cultural heritage resources, freshwater ecosystems and wildlife habitat. The amount of habitat protected for the marbled murrelet, northern goshawk, grizzly bear, mountain goat and tailed frog will increase as new reserves required by the order are developed.

The Province has signed reconciliation protocols with the Coastal First Nations and Nanwakolas Council. Through these government-to-government relationships, separate human well-being agreements have been reached to address issues of special concern to each group of First Nations. Most notably, both have an increased stake in the forest sector. The commercial grizzly bear hunt will cease in Coastal First Nations’ traditional territories.

The Province has committed to amending atmospheric benefit-sharing agreements with Nanwakolas and Coastal First Nations. This will increase the forest carbon credits they can use to support implementation of ecosystem-based management and community development projects of importance to them.

Because of the uniqueness of the Great Bear Rainforest and the innovative elements in the new and amended agreements, the B.C. government intends to introduce supporting legislation in spring 2016.

https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2016PREM0011-000122

Melanie Mark, NDP MLA, Is 1st First Nations Woman Elected To B.C. Legislature

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Posted: 02/03/2016 8:55 am EST Updated: 02/03/2016 9:59 am EST
MELANIE MARK

Melanie Mark grew up in one of Canada’s poorest neighbourhoods, bouncing around the social housing system while her mother struggled with addiction and her siblings lived in foster care.

Decades later, she’s about to become the first indigenous woman to be elected to B.C.’s legislature in the province’s history.

Mark, a New Democrat, snagged a seat in her party’s stronghold of Vancouver-Mount Pleasant in a byelection Monday. She handily defeated Liberal Gavin Dew and Green candidate Pete Fry with over 60 per cent of the vote.

The mother of two will be replacing Jenny Kwan, who moved into federal politics as NDP MP for Vancouver-East last October.

melanie mark
Mark at a campaign launch event in April 2015. (Photo: Facebook)

Mark was a frontrunner throughout the campaign, which was an experience that provided a stark contrast from a childhood marked with hardship.

Now 40, the politician grew up in social housing in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside — an impoverished neighbourhood known for high levels of homelessness, addiction, and mental illness.

Mark’s mother — now 10 years sober — was an alcoholic. Her father was also an addict and died from an overdose when she was in her 20s, the MLA wrote in a letter published by the Georgia Straight last week.

Mark, who is of Cree, Nisga’a, Gitxsan, and Ojibway descent, also had several siblings living in foster care. The future politician said she was left to support them for 16 years, working with “relentless passion” while her mother struggled with addiction.

melanie mark
Mark at a campaign event before winning the byelection in her riding of Vancouver-Mount Pleasant on Feb. 2, 2016. (Photo: Melanie Mark’s Campaign/Flickr)

Mark was shuffled into “over 30” different homes growing up in the neighbourhood, she told the Straight.

But her takeaway from it all, according to her website, wasn’t frailty.

It was “warrior strength.”

Youth advocacy and provincial politics

Mark, who studied political science at B.C.’s Simon Fraser University, spent years advocating for children and youth in the province and across Canada. She worked with organizations such as Covenant House Vancouver, Save the Children, the RCMP, and co-founded Vancouver’s Aboriginal Policing Community Centre.

She also volunteered as president of the city’s Urban Native Youth Association, which helps indigenous youth settle into city life.

Before her foray into politics, Mark worked with B.C. children’s watchdog Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond for nearly a decade.

The politician announced her bid for B.C. legislature in April.

“There was no chance in hell I was going to stand on the sidelines.”

Throughout her campaign, Mark focused on youth advocacy, affordable housing, poverty reduction, and education.

“I’ve never worked so hard to get a job,” the candidate told the Vancouver Courier last year.

Mark’s First Nations heritage was also at the forefront — a part of her identity that shows how far the MLA-elect has come.

“My early days weren’t easy. There was a lot of struggle, and there certainly wasn’t a lot of pride. I faced so much racism in school, and bullies, and really had to fight — whether that [was against] the experiences that my family confronted [or] how my brothers were treated in care,” Mark said at a campaign event on Sunday.

“There was no chance in hell I was going to stand on the sidelines.”

Nine First Nations Unite With Declaration Against LNG Tankers in B.C. Salmon Waters

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by Daniel Mesec on 1/26/16
To the deep beat of drums, hereditary chiefs and elders from coastal and inland First Nations entered the Highlander Hotel and Convention Centre, packed with more than 300 people. They were there for a show of strength and unity against government and the onslaught of gas development in the heart of their traditional lands, the “bread basket” of the Lax Kw’alaams people.

On Saturday January 23 the Lelu Island Declaration was signed by the nine allied tribes of Lax Kw’alaams as well as other hereditary and elected chiefs from neighboring nations, sending a clear message to government and industry that the Skeena watershed will not allow the $11 billion Pacific Northwest Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) project to be built.

The tribes decreed that First Nations have not only rights, but also responsibilities, when it comes to harvesting from and sustaining the environment.

“Our ancestral knowledge, supported by modern science, confirms this area is critical to the future abundance of the wild salmon our communities rely on,” the declaration said. “It is our right and our responsibility as First Nations to protect and defend this place. It is our right to use this area without interference to harvest salmon and marine resources for our sustenance, and commercially in support of our livelihoods.”

Salmon is the link, said Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs (UBCIC) in his remarks closing the weekend summit. Read more…

ILSA Indigenous Awareness Week. Feb 2-5, 2016

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February 2 – 5: ILSA Indigenous Awareness Week

The Indigenous Law Student Association annually hosts Indigenous Awareness Week at Allard Hall at the Allard School of Law. This is an opportunity for students to engage in Indigenous culture and to raise awareness about Indigenous issues. This year the focus is on the Call to Action items from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. For more information, contact Carly.

Source: The Talking Stick: News and Information from the First Nations Longhouse, February 1, 2016

Angelique EagleWoman becomes new dean of Lakehead law school

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Attorney and professor brings a wealth of experience in Indigenous law, say university officials

CBC News Posted: Jan 13, 2016 6:40 AM ETLast Updated: Jan 13, 2016 11:43 AM ET

Angelique EagleWoman has been appointed the new dean of Lakehead University's Bora Laskin Faculty of Law. EagleWoman will leave her current postion at the University of Idaho College of Law, where she is a law professor and a legal
scholar.

Angelique EagleWoman has been appointed the new dean of Lakehead University’s Bora Laskin Faculty of Law. EagleWoman will leave her current postion at the University of Idaho College of Law, where she is a law professor and a legal scholar. (Supplied)

Listen to audio recording…

A northern Ontario university says the new dean of its law school will be the first aboriginal woman to hold that position in Canada.

Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ont., has appointed Angelique EagleWoman to lead the Bora Laskin Faculty of Law starting in May, a month before the fledgling law school’s first class is set to graduate.

EagleWoman will leave her current postion at the University of Idaho College of Law, where she is a law professor and a legal scholar.

She told CBC News she’s impressed with the Lakehead faculty’s focus on rural and small-town practice, environmental law, and Indigenous law.

“Those three areas are all areas I’ve taught in and I have experience in, and I write a lot of articles about,” she said. “So I just thought ‘what a perfect match.'”

EagleWoman has taught in the areas of Tribal Nation economics and law, and Native American natural resources law. She has also published articles on topics like tribal economics and quality of life for Indigenous peoples, according to a Lakehead University press release.

Wants to build ‘distinguished’ law school

She takes over the position in Thunder Bay from the school’s first dean, Lee Stuesser, who resigned in 2015.

EagleWoman said she doesn’t feel that being relatively new to Canada will be an issue, adding that things like environmental law and Indigenous law share common traits on both sides of the border.

“The Truth and Reconciliation Commission recommendations coming out are very common issues with people that are both in the United States and in Canada who are Indigenous,” she said.

“So there’s a real commonality there, and the land doesn’t know political boundaries.”

EagleWoman said she wants to see the school grow and continue to be a forward-thinking institution.

“I hope to move the law school from the start-up phase to taking its place as a distinguished law school, along with the other Ontario and national law schools,” she said.

A biography posted on the school’s site says one of the highlights of her career was serving as general counsel for her own tribe, the Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate in Dakota.

with files from The Canadian Press.

Reference:

(2016, January 18) Audio – Angelique EagleWoman becomes new dean of Lakehead law school. CBC News. Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/law-school-canada-aboriginal-dean-1.3400903?__vfz=tc%3D7c4KA0bOGi9

Job – Assistant Professor, Indigenous Criminology/Socio-Legal Studies. Due: Feb 12, 2016

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The Department of Sociology at the University of Manitoba invites applications for a full-time tenure-track appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor in the area of Indigenous Criminology/Socio-Legal Studies. Position Number:  21467.

The appointment will begin on July 1, 2016, or as soon as possible thereafter. The Department seeks a Criminology/Socio-Legal Studies scholar with research and teaching specialization related to Indigenous peoples and law and/or Indigenous criminology. In addition to specialized courses related to Indigenous Criminology/Socio-Legal Studies, the candidate must be able to teach core introductory Criminology courses (SOC 2510, Criminology and SOC 2610, Criminal Justice and Corrections). The ideal candidate will have a Ph.D. in Sociology, Criminology, or Socio-Legal Studies by the commencement of the appointment, but applicants in cognate disciplines may be considered. The successful candidate must have demonstrated competence in teaching and research. Duties for this position include course development, undergraduate and graduate teaching, graduate supervision, research in the candidate’s area of expertise, and service within the University and the community. Starting salary will be commensurate with experience and qualifications.

The University of Manitoba campuses are located on original lands of Anishinaabeg, Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, and Dene peoples, and on the homeland of the Métis Nation. The University of Manitoba is strongly committed to equity and diversity within its community and especially welcomes applications from women, members of racialized communities, Indigenous persons, persons with disabilities, persons of all sexual orientations and genders, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas.  All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

The Department of Sociology at the University of Manitoba is the second largest department in the Faculty of Arts. Our faculty and students form an active and collegial community committed to excellence in teaching and research. We offer undergraduate programs in Sociology and Criminology and M.A. and Ph.D. programs. Further information concerning the Department and the University may be obtained from http://www.umanitoba.ca/sociology

In order to expedite the selection process, the following documents should be provided to the Search Committee: 1) a letter of application, 2) a statement of how the applicant’s program of study qualifies her/him for the position sought, 3) a brief statement of teaching philosophy and interests, a sample course outline, and evidence of effective teaching, 4) a curriculum vitae, 5) three confidential letters of reference to be received directly from the applicant’s referees, and 6) sample of written work. Applications are to be sent by email to:

Dr. Andrew Woolford, Chair, Search Committee, Department of Sociology, 318 Isbister Building, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada R3T 2N2

Email: Andrew.Woolford@umanitoba.ca; Phone: (204) 474-6058.

 

Deadline for initial review of applications is February 12, 2016. If necessary, the review of applications will continue until the position is filled.

 

Application materials, including letters of reference will be handled in accordance with the protection of privacy provisions of “The Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy (Manitoba). Please note that each curriculum vitae may be provided to participating members of the search process.

http://umanitoba.ca/admin/governance/media/Access_and_Privacy_Policy_-_2015_06_23.pdf.

Legal warriors: Profiles of 5 indigenous lawyers

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Legal warriors: Profiles of 5 indigenous lawyers

From navigating inquiries to defending the land, 5 indigenous lawyers are making a difference

CBC News Posted: Dec 29, 2015 5:00 AM ET

Armed with a law degree, Caleb Behn is emerging as one of the fiercest defenders of Dene territory against the fracking industry.

Armed with a law degree, Caleb Behn is emerging as one of the fiercest defenders of Dene territory against the fracking industry. (Two Island Films)

There was a time in Canada when indigenous peoples weren’t allowed to hire lawyers without the permission of government officials, and First Nations people couldn’t enter law school without first renouncing their “Indian status.”

That all changed in 1954 when the late William Wuttunee graduated from the University of Saskatchewan, becoming Western Canada’s first status Indian lawyer.

Since then, many indigenous people across the country have followed in Wuttunee’s footsteps, graduating from law school, being called to bar and succeeding in a field that was until recently off-limits to them.

Here’s a look at five indigenous people who are using the legal profession to change Canada.

Donald Worme

Donald Worme

Cree lawyer Donald Worme is from the Kawacatoose First Nation in Saskatchewan. (CBC)

A founding member of the Indigenous Bar Association of Canada, Donald Worme is a Cree lawyer based in Saskatoon.

From the Kawacatoose First Nation, Worme first rose to prominence for his work in the Neil Stonechild inquiry in 2003, during which he represented Stonechild’s family.

Since then, Worme has represented many families and groups who often find themselves at odds with police and the justice system. These include the family of Matthew Dumas, shot and killed by Winnipeg police in 2005, and Kinew James, who died in Saskatoon’s Regional Psychiatric Centre in 2013.

Worme was also commission counsel between 2004 and 2006 at the Ipperwash Inquiry — which was tasked with investigating what led to the shooting death of unarmed Anishinaabe protester Dudley George — was more recently, for the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada.

Jean Teillet

Jean Teillet

A great-grandniece of famous Métis leader Louis Riel, Jean Teillet has emerged as a staunch legal defender of indigenous rights. (University of Toronto)

A great-grandniece of famed Métis leader Louis Riel, Jean Teillet had two-decade career in theatre – dancing, acting, teaching and choreographing – before entering the University of Toronto’s law school at age 38.

When she graduated in 1994, she quickly established herself as a staunch defender of indigenous rights.

In 2003, Teillet won a landmark victory in the Supreme Court of Canada for Métis rights. The case centred on Sault Ste. Marie, Ont., resident Steve Powley who was charged with hunting moose without a licence.

Now a partner with Pape Salter Teillet LLP, Teillet specializes in aboriginal rights law, a field in which she’s won numerous awards, including the 2011 Indigenous Peoples’ Council award by the Indigenous Bar Association and a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2012.

Outside the courtroom, Teillet helped create the Métis Nation of Ontario and has served as vice president and treasurer of the Indigenous Bar Association of Canada, and founding president of the Métis Nation Lawyers Association.

Christa Big Canoe

Christa Big Canoe

In 2014, lawyer Christa Big Canoe testified before a House committee reviewing C-26, the government’s controversial prostitution law. (CBC)

A member of the Georgina Island First Nation, an Anishinaabe community in Ontario, Christa Big Canoe is the legal advocacy director of Aboriginal Legal Services of Toronto.

Big Canoe, known as a passionate advocate for First Nation children and women’s rights, has appeared before all levels of court in Canada where she’s provided an aboriginal perspective and representation on issues that most affect aboriginal people in Canadian law.

While at Legal Aid Ontario, she led the province-wide Aboriginal Justice Strategy aimed at removing barriers to accessing justice for First Nation, Métis and Inuit people.

Most recently, Big Canoe is representing six of the seven families of the students whose deaths are the subject of an inquest in Thunder Bay. All of the young people came to the city from remote First Nations to attend high school.

Katherine Hensel

Jonathan Rudin, Katherine Hensel

“There needs to be a 360 degree analysis of what happens in Canadian courtrooms, in the Canadian justice system,” lawyer Katherine Hensel told the CBC. (Law Society Gazette )

Katherine Hensel was called to the bar in 2003.

Just a year later, the member of the Secwepemc nation began to serve as assistant commission counsel for the Ipperwash Inquiry.

After working with a prominent litigation firm for several years, Hensel left to establish Hensel Barristers in 2011. She’s since been involved with several cases involving indigenous rights, and served as counsel for the Native Women’s Association of Canada during the British Columbia’s Missing and Murdered Women’s Inquiry.

Hensel often speaks to the media about issues surrounding indigenous peoples, including a recent appearance on CBC’s The Current, where she offered pointed criticism of the justice system in the wake of a controversial not-guilty decision in the Cindy Gladue murder trial.

“There needs to be a 360-degree analysis of what happens in Canadian courtrooms, in the Canadian justice system,” Hensel said.

Caleb Behn

Caleb Behn

Caleb Behn hasn’t been called to the bar yet, but plans to use law to defend his traditional territory against fracking. (Zack Embree)

He’s not even been called to the bar yet, but Caleb Behn is already planning to use the law to defend the traditional territory of his people, the Dene.

Behn was born into in a very political family, with several close relatives serving as chiefs. He grew up in northern British Columbia, a land increasingly changed as the oil and gas industry grows.

Driven by a responsibility to protect that land and water, Behn entered law school at the University of Victoria.

Before officially entering his chosen profession, Behn has seen that goal — and his life — become the subject of a critically acclaimed 2015 documentary, Fractured Land.

“Anybody who can throw a hatchet and sue you is a force to be reckoned with,” said Bill McKibben, 350.org founder.

(2015, December 29) Legal warriors: Profiles of 5 indigenous lawyers. CBC News. Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/aboriginal/legal-warriors-five-indigenous-lawyers-1.3371819