Literature

Job – Adjunct Professor, Introduction to Creative Writing with an Indigenous Focus, UBC Vancouver. Due: Aug 15, 2017

Posted on Updated on

The Creative Writing Program at the University of British Columbia – Vancouver seeks to hire an Adjunct Professor to teach CRWR 220:  Introduction to Creative Writing with an Indigenous Focus.   The successful candidate will teach creative writing across three genres.  CRWR 220 is a 3-hour course (meets once for 3 hours OR twice weekly at 1.5 hours) with a maximum enrolment of 50 students.  This 3-credit course will be scheduled in 2017 Winter session, term 2 (January to April 2018).

 

Requirements:  An MFA degree is preferred, but a Bachelor’s degree combined with a strong record of creative writing credits will be considered as well.  Applicants must have demonstrated excellence in at least three of the following genres:  fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, radio drama, podcasting, stage play, screen and television, graphics, and storytelling.  Teaching experience at the postsecondary level in the workshop format and strong pedagogical and organizational skills are essential.

 

Applicants are asked to apply through our online application site at http://creativewriting.ubc.ca/program-information/opportunities/adjunct-instructor-indigenous-focus/ with a letter of application, current CV, and evidence of teaching ability and effectiveness (course outlines, student evaluations, etc.).

 

Applicants should also arrange for two confidential letters of recommendation to be sent under separate cover by email to: crwr.admin@ubc.ca.

Deadline for applications and recommendation letters: Tuesday August 15, 2017.

 

Equity and diversity are essential to academic excellence. An open and diverse community fosters the inclusion of voices that have been underrepresented or discouraged. We encourage applications from members of groups that have been marginalized on any grounds enumerated under the B.C. Human Rights Code, including sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, racialization, disability, political belief, religion, marital or family status, age, and/or status as a First Nation, Métis, Inuit, or Indigenous person. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority.

CFP – Essays on The Indigenous Everyday. Due: May 15, 2017

Posted on

Call for Papers: Essays on The Indigenous Everyday
Your auntie dies and you get a letter from the Secretary of the Interior—who knew they cared? You have a fantasy of punching—no, scalping—that guy in the PTA who just said to you: “I have Indian blood too, but not enough to get money.”  Once again, you draw the unhappy chore at a cocktail party of explaining what was not cool about Buffalo Soldiers, President Lincoln, and The Revenant. Also not cool: naming a dog “Denali.” Like everyone else, you go home for the holidays. But you also go home for ceremonies to grieve the losses of the last two centuries: relatives lost in battlefields, museums, boarding schools. You say the Lord’s Prayer in your Native language because you can. Not because you believe it. Or maybe you do.
             What is your riff on The Indigenous Everyday? How does history live and breathe and sometimes completely ruin the ordinary stuff of life? What do you wish non-Natives understood about indigenous experience, history and culture—the good, the bad, and the absurdly beautiful? What riffs do you tell your friends to get you through? How do you, in Charlie Hill’s words, “turn poison into medicine”?
            Our proposed essay collection, I [Heart] Nixon: Essays on the Indigenous Everyday, seeks complete manuscripts of creative nonfiction—personal essays, riffs, mixed-genre pieces and prose poems—that reveal the quotidian pain and ordinary beauty of indigenous life today. We aim for a collection that deftly incorporates humor, history, and individual voice from a range of writers. We invite submissions from writers in the United States, Canada, and the indigenous Pacific.  When applicable, submissions should include a short bibliography “For Further Reading” at the end of the piece, as we aim to market this collection to high school, university, and popular readers. No in-text citations, please! The publisher will be announced later this fall.
            Complete manuscripts should be formatted double-spaced, one-inch margins, in 12-point Times New Roman font.
            Complete manuscripts are due May 15, 2017.
            Send manuscripts to: nixon.anthology@gmail.com
            Questions? Contact Beth H. Piatote and Philip J. Deloria, co-editors, I [Heart] Nixon: Essays on the Indigenous Everyday, at nixon.anthology@gmail.com

 

Tenure-Track Job Openings, UNLV English Department

Posted on

The UNLV English Department is searching for three tenure-track positions. Please follow the links to the right for more information about these positions. For information about the university’s diversity profile, please click on the “UNLV Diversity Fact Sheet” link.

Assistant Professor in American Literature and Native American Studies, Emerson College.

Posted on

Deadline Open until filled
Date Posted August 9, 2016
Type Tenured, tenure track
Salary Competitive
Employment Type Full-time

The Department of Writing, Literature, & Publishing at Emerson College invites applications for a tenure-track position in American literature and Native American Studies. The Department seeks candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research, teaching, and service. The successful candidate will teach a variety of undergraduate and graduate courses in both American literature and Native American Studies. A strong commitment to undergraduate education in a liberal arts environment is essential. This position is at the rank of Assistant Professor. Evidence of scholarly promise is a major consideration. Secondary areas of interest: global Indigenous literatures; Native/Indigenous film and cultural studies. The appointment begins August 24, 2017.

Qualifications:  

A Ph.D. in American Literature and Native American Studies or related field is required.

To apply:

Please submit a letter of application, current curriculum vita, and the names and contact information for three references to the online faculty applicant portal @ https://emerson.peopleadmin.com/postings/12443.

Review of applications will begin in September 2016 and continue until the position is filled.

Emerson College is committed to an active, intentional, and ongoing engagement with diversity—in people, in the curriculum, in the co-curriculum, and in the college’s intellectual, social, cultural, and geographical communities.  Emerson endorses a framework of inclusive excellence, which recognizes that institutional excellence comes from fully engaging with diversity in all aspects of institutional activities.  We particularly invite applications from historically underrepresented groups.

The Department of Writing, Literature & Publishing is a vibrant and engaged community of scholars, writers, and designers with over 100 full- and part-time faculty members, 550 undergraduate majors, and 250 graduate students in a Creative Writing MFA program, Popular Fiction MFA online program, and Publishing MA program.

Emerson College is the nation’s only four-year institution dedicated exclusively to majors in communication and the arts in a liberal arts context.  It is located in Boston’s Literary Cultural District in the dynamic multi-cultural city of Boston in close proximity to major publishing houses, arts institutions, and research centers.  The college enrolls 3,783 undergraduate students and 671 graduate students from 71 countries and 48 states.

– See more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/jobs/0000326021-01#sthash.72oPwDj5.dpuf

B.C. author challenges Canadians to sign up for TRC reading challenge

Posted on

Jennifer Manuel wants 1,000 people to pledge by National Aboriginal Day

Truth and Reconciliation 20130918

Jennifer Manuel, from Duncan, B.C., launched an online campaign to get people to read the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) summary report (Darryl Dyck/CP)

4.6k  shares

A B.C. author wants 1,000 people to take up the challenge to read the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) summary report.

Jennifer Manuel, from Duncan, B.C., launched an online campaign, the TRC Reading Challenge, and aims to reach her goal by National Aboriginal Day on June 21.

“It’s one thing to say you’re listening and it’s another to actually try and show that you’re listening,” said Manuel, who has worked as a treaty archivist and school teacher.

Manuel said within a couple days of the challenge’s launch on April 5, she had more than a 100 people sign on and it picked up more steam over the weekend.

“Every time that somebody pledges I get an email alert and I’ve had to turn that off,” she said.

Manuel says she’ll be publishing the names of the people who make the pledge and they will be able to self-report their reading progress as a way to show they’re taking part.

Read More…

Assistant or Associate Professor in Indigenous Literatures, Department of English. Due: Mar 31, 2016

Posted on

Assistant or Associate Professor in Indigenous Literatures, Department of English, Faculty of Arts
Job ID: 9966

Updated: February 23, 2016

Location: Main Campus

Position Description

The Faculty of Arts, Department of English, invites applications at the rank of Assistant Professor (tenure-track) or Associate Professor (with tenure) in the area of Indigenous Literatures.  The anticipated start date is July 1, 2016.

We are seeking candidates who will establish and maintain an active research program with the ability to secure external research funding; produce high impact research and scholarship in their area of specialization; teach graduate and undergraduate courses, and supervise graduate and undergraduate students; and engage in meaningful service activities within the department, faculty, university and community.

As a faculty member in the Department of English, the successful applicant will have a PhD in English or Indigenous-related literary studies and a demonstrated ability to conduct research and develop partnerships with local communities. Candidates will have interdisciplinary strength in Indigenous Studies and the ability to direct the Faculty of Arts’ International Indigenous Studies program (http://www.ucalgary.ca/indg/).

Applicants at the Assistant Professor level are expected to provide evidence of, or potential for, excellence in both research and teaching through peer-reviewed publications in leading journals and academic presses, and have a track record of successful grant applications, course development and teaching effectiveness, as well as community-engaged scholarship with Indigenous peoples.

Applicants at the Associate Professor rank must demonstrate excellence in research, teaching and community engagement through publications in leading journals and academic presses, proven success in obtaining competitive research funding, evidence of teaching effectiveness and instructional development, as well as successfully concluded projects with Indigenous peoples. The successful candidate will be able to assume a leadership role at the beginning of the appointment.

The Department of English is a research-intensive department with high standards in teaching. It values interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches to research and training, and strongly encourages collaboration. The department has thriving MA and PhD programs, and recognized strengths in historical literary periods, archival and book history, postcolonial literature, creative writing, new media and digital humanities, among other areas. For more information about the Department of English, please visit https://english.ucalgary.ca/. With 56 undergraduate programs and over 7,100 students, the Faculty of Arts is the largest and most diverse faculty at the University of Calgary. For information on the Faculty of Arts, please visit https://arts.ucalgary.ca/about. For information on programs and departments in the Faculty of Arts, please visit https://arts.ucalgary.ca/programs.

In their letter to the committee, applicants should address current and future research directions including community engagement. They should also send a current curriculum vitae, one refereed publication, and evidence of teaching excellence such as a statement of teaching philosophy, recent teaching evaluations, examples of course development; and should arrange to have three confidential letters of reference forwarded directly to:

Dr. Jacqueline Jenkins
Head of English
Faculty of Arts
University of Calgary
2500 University Drive NW
Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4

or by email to Barb Howe, at howe@ucalgary.ca

All applications must be received by March 31, 2016.

The University of Calgary believes that a respectful workplace, equal opportunity and building a diverse workforce contribute to the richness of the environment for teaching, learning and research, and provide faculty, staff, students and the public with a university that reflects the society it serves. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. In this connection, at the time of your application, please answer the following question: Are you a Canadian citizen or a permanent resident of Canada? (Yes/No)

Additional Information

To view a listing of all available academic opportunities and to find out more about what the University of Calgary has to offer, please visit our Academic Careers website.

About the University of Calgary

The University of Calgary is Canada’s leading next-generation university – a living, growing and youthful institution that embraces change and opportunity with a can-do attitude. Located in the nation’s most enterprising city, the university is making tremendous progress on its Eyes High journey to become one of Canada’s top five research universities, grounded in innovative learning and teaching and fully integrated with the community it both serves and leads. Ranked as the top young university in Canada and North America, the University of Calgary inspires and supports discovery, creativity and innovation across all disciplines. For more information, visit ucalgary.ca.

About Calgary, Alberta

Ranked the 5th most livable city in the world, Calgary is one of the world’s cleanest cities and one of the best cities in Canada to raise a family. Calgary is a city of leaders – in business, community, philanthropy and volunteerism. Calgarians benefit from a growing number of world-class dining and cultural events and enjoy more days of sunshine per year than any other major Canadian city. Calgary is less than an hour’s drive from the majestic Rocky Mountains and boasts the most extensive urban pathway and bikeway network in North America.

 

Apply Online: http://careers.ucalgary.ca/jobs/5055528-assistant-or-associate-professor-in-indigenous-literatures-department-of-english-faculty-of-arts

Why Native poets, and their languages, are so often misunderstood

Posted on Updated on

Why Native poets, and their languages, are so often misunderstood

by Corinne Segal  November 23, 2015 at 11:20 AM EST

landscape_copyright_BrianAdams-1024x575.jpg
Poet Joan Naviyuk Kane. Photo by Brian Adams

Alaskan Native poet Joan Naviyuk Kane’s poems grow from one word.

In the case of the poem “Compass,” that word is “Uaałukitaaqtuq,” an Inupiaq word that describes the feeling of being “in a boat, and the waves are rocking you back and forth,” Kane said.

Kane writes in Inupiaq, one of the languages spoken by the Native Alaskan people. Many of her poems are inspired by the sound or feel of one word; then, she “build[s] the poem, either through sonic value or tone or emotional value, or intellectual resonances that come up through language,” she said. Kane, who lives in Anchorage, Alaska, often asks her mother, who taught her and her sons Inupiaq, to suggest certain words or phrases.

The act of writing in a Native language is one tool against the misconceptions that exist about Native people in the U.S. — those that do not account for the reality of diverse, thriving Native cultures, she said.

“There is something that is very troublesome to me about … playing into this continued exoticization or fetishization of the Native person as a relic of the past, as a romantic figure, as something outdated or very other,” she said. “Native people from very different parts of the United States are expected to have similarities because we happened to be colonized by the same government — there’s something problematic there.”

The work that Native artists produce speaks to the diversity of Native people in the U.S., she said. “In Alaska, we still call ourselves Eskimo people. We’re very different, culturally, linguistically, socially, geographically, than what people consider the American Indian population,” she said.

“Compass” began as an exploration of her mother’s relationship with her sons. But “it became instead, like many of my poems, a more terrifying psychological exploration of what it means to be a woman,” she said.

The poem outlines the speaker’s physical reality in short declarations, a linguistic pattern that which Kane said reflects her understanding of Inupiaq. Read more…

CFP – Storying Solidarities: Sites of Autonomy and Alliance in Indigenous Literary Arts, University of Calgary. Due: Feb 1, 2016

Posted on Updated on

Storying Solidarities:
Sites of Autonomy and Alliance in Indigenous Literary Arts

A Gathering of the Indigenous Literary Studies Association
May 28th-29th, 2016
Academic Congress, The University of Calgary, Treaty 7 Territory

In the Traditional Lands of the Blackfoot Confederacy Calgary, Alberta, Canada

For its second annual gathering, and the first time at Academic Congress, the Indigenous Literary Studies Association seeks to think together about the sometimes conflicted relationship between alliance and autonomy in decolonial struggles as imagined, illustrated, and interrogated through Indigenous literary arts. While terms like “solidarity” and “alliance” tend to be valued as inherently positive, their often vague and uncritical application risks masking and thereby sustaining settler colonial power in ways that might threaten Indigenous autonomy and self-determination.

We invite scholars, knowledge-keepers, artists, and community members to explore the tensions that persist between the generative possibilities of consensual alliance and the ongoing urgency for what Métis artist and scholar David Garneau calls “irreconcilable spaces of Aboriginality”: “gatherings, ceremony, Cree-only discussions, kitchen-table conversations, email exchanges, etc. in which Blackfootness, Métisness, Indianness, Aboriginality, and/or Indigeneity is performed apart from a Settler audience” (33). In particular, we invite participants to consider the ways in which Indigenous literary arts provide tools for imagining and enacting solidarities with genuinely decolonizing potential, while laying bare the ethical dimensions such solidarities demand.

We welcome participants to consider alliance in its multiple and expansive dimensions — among Indigenous nations, between Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists, between Indigenous scholars and the communities with which they identify, between Indigenous decolonization movements and other social justice movements, and between Indigenous literary studies and Indigenous Studies more broadly. We also welcome participants to conceive of literary arts expansively; we welcome discussions of literature, film, theatre, storytelling, song, hip-hop, and other forms of narrative expression.

Prospective participants are invited to propose conference papers, panels, roundtables, workshops, performances, and other formats for special sessions. Sessions will be 90 minutes in duration, including at least 15 minutes for collaborative dialogue. While open to all proposals dealing with Indigenous literary arts, ILSA encourages proposals for sessions and individual presentations that engage with any of the following topics:

  • Autonomy and Alliance in Treaty 7 Territory
  • Confederacy, Intertribal Alliance, and the Literary Arts
  • The Terrain of “Solidarity” in Community-Based Participatory Research
  • What David Garneau calls “Irreconcilable Spaces of Aboriginality”
  • What Leanne Simpson calls “Sovereign Sites of Intimacy”
  • Activist Alliances among Indigenous and Diasporic Artists
  • Kinship and Alliance with the Other-than-Human
  • Art, Autonomy, and Idlenomore
  • Literary Methods and Narrative Arts as Praxis
  • Orality and Solidarity Building
  • Collaborative Creation and Multi-Media
  • Artistic Expressions of Sovereignty and Self-Determination
  • Land-based Solidarities and the Literary Arts
  • Intimacy and Erotics as Expressions of AllianceStorying Solidarities features keynote speakers Eldon Yellowhorn (confirmed) & Leanne Betasamosake Simpson (unconfirmed). The gathering also features the Renate Eigenbrod Memorial Mentorship Lunch, which will connect emerging artists and scholars with established mentors; both mentors and mentees can register for the event by contacting Deanna Reder at dhr@sfu.ca. In collaboration with the Canadian Association for Commonwealth Literature and Languages Studies, this year’s “Aboriginal Roundtable” will bring together artists, activists, and academics who will engage the theme: “Decolonial Solidarities: Ecology, Gender, and Ethical Calls to Action.” Those interested in participating in the roundtable as featured speakers, please contact Sophie McCall at smccall@sfu.ca.Proposals for individual presentations should include the presenter’s name, institutional and/or tribal affiliation, email address, and telephone number; the presentation’s title; and a 250-word abstract that should identify the presenter’s desired format. Proposals for special sessions should include the session organizer’s name, institutional and/or tribal affiliation, email address, and telephone number; a list of confirmed participants’ names and affiliations; the session’s title; a 250-word description of the session’s goals, format, and significance, and 100-word descriptions of each participant’s contribution to the session.

    The deadline for all proposals is February 1st, 2016. All proposals should be sent to ilsaconference@gmail.com.

CFP – pdf file: CFP Storying Solidarities for ILSA 2016

These Authors Are Writing in Indigenous Languages to Keep Native Traditions Alive

Posted on

These Authors Are Writing in Indigenous Languages to Keep Native Traditions Alive

By October 12, 2015

Those who write books in indigenous languages are not in it for the E.L. James money or fame. Javier Castellanos, who won the 2002 Premio Nacional de Literatura Indígena Nezahualcóyotl, said that authors of books in indigenous languages rarely have critics, let alone readers. Despite the modest audience for the work, the importance can’t be overstated. It’s one way that native languages are being kept alive.

Castellanos, with the help of Jóvenes Creadores del Fondo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes, tutors a group of young writers who have been working on ambitious and completely badass projects. There’s Pergentino José from Oaxaca, who plans to take the oral stories and traditions of Zapoteco de Loxicha into stories that can be held. For Elizabeth Sáenz Díaz, it’s about writing stories so that newer generations can continue to have a connection to Zoque.

Because it’s impressive to hear about these projects, we’ve compiled a list of five writers who are holding it down for the indigenous populations. Read More…

Original Article: http://remezcla.com/lists/books-indigenous-languages-americas/

Book Launch and Reading: Broken Man, at Vancouver Public Library, Nov. 14, 2015, 3-5pm

Posted on Updated on

Untitled

HUMMINGBIRD DREAMS PRESS promotes Indigenous writers, artists, storytellers and translators. Our collections explore inter-culturality, bilingual editions, ethical financing and diverse forms of distribution. As cultural caretakers, we celebrate Indigenous world views, the reconstitution of cultural identities and the foregrounding of luminous contributions.