Mental health

Facing ‘colonial history’ key for Indigenous youth: Crime Prevention Ottawa

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Broader cultural education could help steer Indigenous youth away from criminal justice system, author says

CBC News Posted: Feb 14, 2017 4:54 PM ETLast Updated: Feb 14, 2017 8:53 PM ET

Melanie Bania presented the results of her study on preventing the criminalization of Indigenous youth at Ottawa City Hall on Tuesday. (Giacomo Panico/CBC )

A renewed focus on broader cultural education that confronts rather than ignores Canada’s “colonial history” could help steer Indigenous youth away from the criminal justice system, according to a new report by Crime Prevention Ottawa.

The report, titled Culture as Catalyst: Preventing the Criminalization of Indigenous Youth, was released during a presentation at Ottawa City Hall Tuesday morning.

Marc Maracle is the chair of the Ottawa Aboriginal Coalition, which helped lay the groundwork and provide background information for the report. (Roger Dubois/CBC)

According to the report, traumatic events stemming from “colonizing policies” such as the residential school system contribute to the disproportionately high rates of poverty, poor education and unsafe housing experienced by Indigenous people in Canada.
As a result, the paper concludes, Indigenous youth and adults are highly over-represented in the Canadian criminal justice system.
“The research also shows that a connection to culture is very important for all young people, but that for Indigenous people in particular that connection to culture is directly linked to their sense of identity,” said Melanie Bania, the report’s author. Read More…
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Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Community-Engaged Adolescent Mental Health, Simon Fraser University.

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Simon Fraser University invites applications for a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair (CRC) in Community-Engaged Adolescent Mental Health.

The proposed Chair will be embedded at SFU Surrey – a vibrant community hub located in one of Canada’s fastest-growing cities. S/he will take a leadership role in building research capacity that benefits the City of Surrey, and that will have important implications for adolescent mental health in British Columbia, across Canada, and beyond. The Chair will work closely with City of Surrey partners from multiple sectors such as health (including the Fraser Health Authority and its regional Child and Youth Mental Health Substance Use program), education, law enforcement, social services, government, and community partners. The Chair will also create ties with other researchers working in the area of adolescent mental health and mental health policy. The Surrey-based CRC holds promise for increasing linkages with the Surrey community and strengthening SFU’s research presence in this city and beyond. Over time, it is anticipated that this Chair will leverage his/her Surrey-based research program to capitalize on innovative developments and collaborative research opportunities at the local, national, and international levels.

We are seeking an outstanding and innovative researcher who is internationally-recognized in the field of adolescent mental health with a focus on one or more of the following areas: program implementation and evaluation; diversity and culturally sensitive programming; determinants of mental health; and intersectoral and upstream approaches to enhancing mental health. The preferred candidate could have a disciplinary background in health, education, or the social sciences (e.g., psychology).

The successful candidate will play a leadership role in establishing a cutting-edge, community-relevant research facility and lead a research program focused on the advancement of community-based and clinically relevant strategies designed to maximize the mental health of young people.

This position is contingent upon the applicant being awarded a Tier 1 Canada Research Chair; therefore, only senior investigators with outstanding publication records and a proven track record of working with communities and developing research centres/institutes will be considered. The position is tenable for seven years and renewable. Please review the initial appointment and chair renewal details of the CRC Program.

Application Process:

Applicants should submit:

1) a full curriculum vitae
2) the names of six academic referees
3) a 3-4 page document summarizing their qualifications for the Chair and a proposed vision for developing a program of research, including a training program and leadership plan.

All applications should be submitted to:

Dr. Joy Johnson
Chair, Adolescent Mental Health CRC Search Committee
Vice-President, Research
Simon Fraser University
vpres@sfu.ca

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; however, Canadian citizens and permanent residents will be given priority. Simon Fraser University is committed to employment equity and encourages applications from all qualified women and men, including visible minorities, aboriginal people, and persons with disabilities.

The position is subject to the availability of funding and to final approval by the University Board of Governors and the Tri-agency Institutional Programs Secretariat.

The competition will remain open until the position is filled. Screening of applications will commence on January 31, 2017.

All applications will be reviewed by the Search Committee. The Committee will recommend one candidate for ratification by the faculty member’s home department or school. The Faculty in which the CRC is to be situated will be determined based on best-fit once an appropriate candidate is nominated. The successful applicant will work with the department/Faculty and the Major Projects Office to develop a full proposal for submission to the CRC Secretariat.

Under the authority of the University Act, personal information that is required by the University for academic appointments will be collected. For further details, please see the Collection Notice.

Graduate Programs: CTLT, Teaching Assistants Institute

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The TA Institute is open to any graduate student who is interested in teaching or TAing. The Institute includes sessions on teaching and learning theory, scholarship, classroom strategies, campus climate, and lesson design.

 

Design Thinking in Teaching

January 10, 2017

9:30 am–11:30 am

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

How do you design a successful lesson? This workshop will discuss common challenges in lesson planning and develop a toolkit of best practices and strategies. More info

 

Grad Student Mental Health

January 10, 2017

12:30 pm–2:30 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

Do you ever feel overwhelmed as a TA and feel like students can see right through you? In this workshop, we will address raising self-awareness on “impostor syndrome” and identify strategies for self-care and navigating teaching and life as a grad student. More info

 

Developing a SoTL Project

January 10, 2017

3:00 pm–5:00 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

This workshop will help you design a research project to evaluate the quality of teaching and learning in your course. Learn the fundamentals of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning and create a blueprint for your very first SoTL project. More info

 

Metacognition, Lifelong Learning, and Disciplinary Practice

January 11, 2017

9:30 am–11:30 am

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

How can you help students become lifelong learners? This session will examine the idea of metacognition as a distinct and valuable practice in teaching and learning. More info

 

Transliteracies

January 11, 2017

12:30 pm–2:30 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

This workshop explores how TAs can develop safer, more trans-inclusive pedagogical practices in their various role(s) in the classroom and on campus. More info

 

Giving Guest Lectures and Presentations

January 11, 2017

3:00 pm–5:00 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

Learn more about guest lectures and presentations, and design a toolkit to prepare for successful lectures or presentations. More info

 

Experiential Learning: Concept and its Application in Lesson Planning

January 12, 2017

9:30 am–11:30 am

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

Explore the experiential learning cycle, its value in teaching contexts, and ways to integrate the model into your lesson planning and teaching. More info

 

Incorporating Results from SoTL

January 12, 2017

12:30 pm–2:30 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

This professional development workshop is open to grad students interested in learning more about Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. More info

 

Unsettling Group Guidelines

January 12, 2017

3:00 pm–5:00 pm

Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Seminar Room 2.22

 

Classroom guidelines are often used by educators with the intent to establish a “safe” learning environment. But others have argued that classroom guidelines sometimes fail to recognize and respond to issues of power and social position. More info

 

Thank You!

 

Elissa Morris
Events Assistant | Centre for Teaching Learning and Technology
The University of British Columbia | Vancouver
214-1961 East Mall, Vancouver BC, V6T 1Z1 Canada
Phone 604 827 4871| elissa.morris@ubc.ca

http://www.ctlt.ubc.ca | @UBC_CTLT

 

 

Inner Peace? The Dalai Lama Made a Website for That

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The Dalai Lama spoke about the Atlas of Emotions study at the Wilson House on the Sisters of St. Francis’ Assisi Heights campus in Rochester, Minn. Credit Tim Gruber for The New York Times

ROCHESTER, Minn. — The Dalai Lama, who tirelessly preaches inner peace while chiding people for their selfish, materialistic ways, has commissioned scientists for a lofty mission: to help turn secular audiences into more self-aware, compassionate humans.

That is, of course, no easy task. So the Dalai Lama ordered up something with a grand name to go with his grand ambitions: a comprehensive Atlas of Emotions to help the more than seven billion people on the planet navigate the morass of their feelings to attain peace and happiness.

“It is my duty to publish such work,” the Dalai Lama said.

To create this “map of the mind,” as he called it, the Dalai Lama reached out to a source Hollywood had used to plumb the workings of the human psyche.

Specifically, he commissioned his good friend Paul Ekman — a psychologist who helped advise the creators of Pixar’s “Inside Out,” an animated film set inside a girl’s head — to map out the range of human sentiments. Dr. Ekman later distilled them into the five basic emotions depicted in the movie, from anger to enjoyment.

Dr. Ekman’s daughter, Eve, also a psychologist, worked on the project as well, with the goal of producing an interactive guide to human emotions that anyone with an Internet connection could study in a quest for self-understanding, calm and constructive action.

“We have, by nature or biologically, this destructive emotion, also constructive emotion,” the Dalai Lama said. “This innerness, people should pay more attention to, from kindergarten level up to university level. This is not just for knowledge, but in order to create a happy human being. Happy family, happy community and, finally, happy humanity.”

The Dalai Lama paid Dr. Ekman at least $750,000 to develop the project, which began with a request several years ago.

Dr. Ekman recalled the Dalai Lama telling him: “When we wanted to get to the New World, we needed a map. So make a map of emotions so we can get to a calm state.”

As a first step, Dr. Ekman conducted a survey of 149 scientists (emotion scientists, neuroscientists and psychologists who are published leaders in their fields) to see where there was consensus about the nature of emotions, the moods or states they produce, and related areas.

Based on the survey, Dr. Ekman concluded that there were five broad categories of emotions — anger, fear, disgust, sadness and enjoyment — and that each had an elaborate subset of emotional states, triggers, actions and moods. He took these findings to a cartography and data visualization firm, Stamen, to depict them in a visual and, he hoped, useful way.

“If it isn’t fun, it’s a failure,” Dr. Ekman said. “It’s got to be fun for people to use.”

Photo

A diagram from the Atlas of Emotions. Credit Paul Ekman

Stamen’s founder, Eric Rodenbeck, has created data visualizations for Google, Facebook and MTV, as well as maps showing climate change and rising oceans. But he said the Atlas was the most challenging project he had worked on because it was “built around knowledge and wisdom rather than data.”

Not surprisingly, getting scientists to reach a unified understanding of human emotions was difficult.

Dacher Keltner, a professor of psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, also counseled Pixar on establishing and depicting the emotional characters for “Inside Out.” He has even advised Facebook on emoticons.

Although Dr. Keltner took part in Dr. Ekman’s survey, the two are not in complete agreement on the number of core emotions. Still, Dr. Keltner said he saw the project as a good step.

“The survey questions could have allowed for more gray areas,” he said. “But it’s important to take stock of what the scientific consensus is in the field.”

Dr. Ekman emphasized that the Atlas was not a scientific work intended for peer review.

“It is a visualization for what we think has been learned from scientific studies,” he said. “It’s a transformative process, a work of explanation.”

The Dalai Lama wants to keep religion out of it.

“If we see this research work as relying on religious belief or tradition, then it automatically becomes limited,” he said. “Even if you pray to God, pray to Buddha, emotionally, very nice, very good. But every problem, we have created. So I think even God or Buddha cannot do much.”

The Dalai Lama said he hoped the Atlas could be a tool for cultivating good in the world by defeating the bad within us.

“Ultimately, our emotion is the real troublemaker,” he said. “We have to know the nature of that enemy.”

Read More…

Reference:
New York Times. Inner Peace? The Dalai Lama Made a Website for That
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/07/world/dalai-lama-website-atlas-of-emotions.html?_r=0 Retrieved on May 6, 2016.

CFP – Conceptualizing Children & Youth Conference, Brock University. Due: April 28, 2016

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CALL FOR PAPERS

CONCEPTUALIZING CHILDREN AND YOUTH CONFERENCE

Brock University – October 12-14, 2016

Brock University’s Department of Child and Youth Studies announces “Conceptualizing Children and Youth”   a multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary conference. All disciplines, multidisciplinary, and transdisciplinary approaches to research within Child and Youth Studies are welcome. The Conference will be held October  12-14, 2016 at Brock University in St. Catharines Ontario.

 

The conference will include keynote speakers, special evening events, networking opportunities, and graduate student events. There will be highlighted sessions on child and youth engagement in sport/performance; child and youth health/mental health; diverse children and youth; education contexts; Indigenous children and youth research; social issues facing children and youth; transdisciplinary in child  and youth research. There will also be additional dissemination opportunities.

 

To submit please complete the attached abstract form to dzinga@brocku.ca by April 28, 2016. Submissions may take the form of posters, individual papers, symposiums, or workshops.  Notification of results will be communicated by June 30, 2016.

 

Dawn Zinga, Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Child and Youth Studies, Brock University 905-688-5550, ext.3152, Cairns 325

A Metaphoric Mind: Selected Writings of Joseph Couture

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Joseph Couture was a key member of the Network for Aboriginal Mental Health Research. We are pleased to announce the published of his collected essays.

A Metaphoric Mind: Selected Writings of Joseph Couture is a collection of essays by Joe Couture, the educational psychologist and expert in Aboriginal healing who spearheaded the formation of the first native studies department at Trent University. Edited by Ruth Couture and Virginia McGowan, the essays touch on the growth of Aboriginal activism in the 1960s and 1970s as well as topics germane to the movement: spirituality and ancestral ways of knowing, Elders and their teachings, justice and the restorative process, and the role of education in self-determination and social change.

Information on the book can be found here: http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120198

Athabasca University Press is an open-access press, which means that PDF copies of the book are available on our website for anybody to download.