Musqueam

Traditional Naming & Pole Raising Ceremony at the Indigenous Health, Research and Education Garden – 12pm – 3pm, 3 Oct 2016

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Please join us at the garden on Monday October 3rd from 12pm – 3pm for a Traditional Naming and Pole Raising Ceremony. We are honoured to grow medicines, learn, conduct research, and build community on the beautiful unceded territory of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ speaking Musqueam people, and are grateful to announce that the Indigenous Health, Research and Education Garden will be receiving a traditional Musqueam name.

Job – Musqueam Indian Band: Musqueam Historical Timeline Project Assistant. June 17, 2016

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The Musqueam Indian Band (MIB) and the University of British Columbia – Vancouver Campus (UBC) are seeking a motivated UBC student to work as a Musqueam Historical Timeline Project Assistant. The Project Assistant will play a key role in the development and delivery of the Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund (TLEF) grant “Developing a UBC-Aboriginal Timeline with Musqueam content – Time and Place at UBC: Our Histories and Relations” (More information). As part of the TLEF project team, comprising partners from MIB and UBC, the Project Assistant will work to enhance the Time and Place at UBC: Our Histories and Relations (http://timeandplace.ubc.ca ) digital timeline by creating a new line with the history of the Musqueam Nation, including the community’s relationship with UBC.

Employment date: late June 2016 – April 2017, requiring an average of 10 – 12 hours/week

Application deadline: June 17, 2016 at 4:00PM

Apply with résumé and cover letter to: Musqueam Indian Band, Human Resources, 6735 Salish Drive, Vancouver, BC, V6N 4C4, Fax: (604) 263-4212, e-mail jobs@musqueam.bc.ca

Information: http://fnis.arts.ubc.ca/2016/06/03/jobb-opportunity-musqueam-historical-timeline-project-assistant

Musqueam Post dedicated at UBC Vancouver campus

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Musqueam artist Brent Sparrow Jr. carved the new Musqueam Post during UBC’s Centennial year. Photo credit: Reese Muntean

The Musqueam people and the University of British Columbia acknowledged their developing partnership today with the dedication of a striking cedar post installed prominently on the Point Grey campus, which is located on the traditional, ancestral and unceded territory of the Musqueam people.

Carved by talented Musqueam artist, Brent Sparrow Jr., the post tells an origin story of the Musqueam involving a two-headed serpent.

“We cherish the relationship between the university and the Musqueam,” said Musqueam Chief Wayne Sparrow. “As UBC is on our traditional territory, it’s important that we work together closely to share our culture and look for opportunities to work together.”

The new Musqueam post is now installed, facing east towards the new Robert H. Lee Alumni Centre and the campus entrance, at the foot of a cascading water feature at University Boulevard and East Mall.

“This beautiful post will serve as a permanent welcome to all visitors to these grounds and as a reminder of our relationship with the Musqueam people who were here long before UBC’s history began,” said Interim President Martha Piper. “Its dedication, one of the closing events of UBC’s Centennial year, points towards renewed—and stronger—relationships in the future.”

The land upon which UBC and the post are situated has always been a place of learning for the Musqueam people, where culture, history, and traditions have been passed from one generation to the next.

A time-lapse video of the installation of the Musqueam post can be viewed here: https://youtu.be/1ii_DjN1kz8

A photo gallery of the creation of the Musqueam post can be viewed here: http://100.ubc.ca/galleries/musqueam-post/

For more on the post and the history of the Musqueam-UBC relationship, see http://centennial.aboriginal.ubc.ca

For more about partnership between the Musqueam and UBC, including academic courses and youth programs, visit: http://aboriginal.ubc.ca/community-youth/musqueam-and-ubc/

Brent Sparrow Jr. speaks about the Musqueam Post:

“This qeqən (post) tells the story of the origin of our name xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam). The old people spoke of a small lake called xʷməm̓qʷe:m (Camosun Bog) where the sʔi:ɬqəy̓ (double-headed serpent) originated. They were warned as youth to be cautious and not go near or they would surely die. This sʔi:ɬqəy̓ was so massive its winding path from the lake to the stal̕əw̓ (river) became the creek flowing through Musqueam to this day. Everything the serpent passed over died and from its droppings bloomed a new plant, the məθkʷəy̓. For this reason the people of long ago named that place xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam – place of the məθkʷəy̓)

This qeqən represents our xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) ancestors and our ongoing connection to them and this land through their teachings. The figure is holding the sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s tail to showcase this sχʷəy̓em̓’s (ancient history) passage through generations, relating how we became known as xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) people – People of the məθkʷəy̓ plant. The scalloping reflects the sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s path and trigons represent the unique məθkʷəy̓ plant. The sʔi:ɬqəy̓’s stomach is said to have been as big as a storage basket, designed here as an oval. I drew upon these traditional design elements to depict this rich history.”

Significant Musqueam-UBC milestones

1927: A pair of Musqueam house posts are presented to UBC: http://100.ubc.ca/timeline/musqueam-house-posts-are-presented-to-ubc/

1993: The First Nations Longhouse, built in consultation with Musqueam and many other Aboriginal groups, opens as a gathering place for Aboriginal students and a place of learning for people from the broader community.

2006: The University of British Columbia and the Musqueam Indian Band sign a historic memorandum of affiliation to further the sharing of knowledge and the advancement of Musqueam and Aboriginal youth and adults in post-secondary education.

MUSQUEAM EXHIBITION WINS CANADIAN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION PUBLIC HISTORY PRIZE

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MUSQUEAM EXHIBITION WINS CANADIAN HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION PUBLIC HISTORY PRIZE
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The Canadian Committee on Public History awarded its 5th annual Public History Prize Tuesday at the annual meeting of the Canadian Historical Association in Ottawa. The winning project emerged from a curatorial partnership between the Museum of Vancouver, Museum of Anthropology, University of Waterloo, and Musqueam Nation. The collaboration culminated with the creation of c̓əsnaʔәm: the city before the city, a multi-site exhibition project.

This multi-disciplinary, community-based Indigenous research project resulted in a series of three museum exhibitions (all currently on display) at the Museum of Vancouver (2015-2020), Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia (2015-2016), and Musqueam Cultural Education Resource Centre (2015-2016).

c̓əsnaʔәm: the city before the city examines the history of Vancouver from the point of view of the Musqueam First Nation. It brings a critical history of city building, colonialism and dispossession, museum collecting practices, and Indigenous activism to public audiences. The project also engages many varied groups in discussions about conflicting and complex interpretations of Indigenous history and heritage sites as well as current debates about heritage and development in the city.

As Musqueam cultural advisor Larry Grant explains, “c̓əsnaʔәm: the city before the city aims at ‘righting history’ by creating a space for Musqueam to share their knowledge, culture and history and to highlight the community’s role in shaping the City of Vancouver.”

“We are thrilled that the committee has recognized this project as an example of innovative scholarship and public engagement,” says Susan Roy, historian at the University of Waterloo and MOV guest curator.

The award recognizes work that achieves high standards of original research, scholarship, and presentation; brings an innovative public history contribution to its audience; and serves as a model for future work, advancing the field of public history in Canada.

Upon accepting the award in Ottawa, Roy shared, “The c̓əsnaʔәm exhibition team is honoured to receive this acknowledgement that recognizes the importance of developing highly collaborative curatorial practices to reflect and promote new understanding of aboriginal history in Canada.”

For more information about the c̓əsnaʔәm: the city before the city exhibitions, please visit: http://www.thecitybeforethecity.com.

More information about past Public History Prize winners can be viewed here:
http://www.cha-shc.ca/english/what-we-do/cha-prizes/public-history-prize.html#sthash.h4gwPXSu.LEMb9OLQ.dpbs

Source: http://moa.ubc.ca/canadian-historical-association-public-history-prize/

Job – Indigenous Programs Liaison at UBC Farm, Due Feb. 11, 2015

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Deadline Wednesday, February 11: Indigenous Programs Liaison Job Opportunity at UBC Farm

The Centre for Sustainable Food Systems, on unceded ancestral Musqueam territory at UBC Farm, is seeking an Indigenous Programs Liaison. This individual will work closely with the Indigenous Programs at the UBC Farm, UBC Farm staff, UBC community, and community at large to support and enhance communication and relationship-building among these groups. Ideal candidates will have experience facilitating cross-cultural dialogue or consultation, will be comfortable working in both University and community settings, and will have awareness of, respect for, and sensitivity to Indigenous worldviews, spiritualities, histories, daily realities, and relationships with the land.

For full posting details, visit here: http://ubcfarm.ubc.ca/about/careers