Navajo

Job – Lecturer II – Department of Linguistics Navajo Language Program, University of New ACMexico. Due: Oct 26, 2015

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LECTURER II

The University of New Mexico Department of Linguistics

Position Summary:

The Department of Linguistics Navajo Language Program at the University of New Mexico announces a search for a Lecturer II to begin working January 11, 2016. The position is contingent upon final budgetary approval. Responsibilities include:

1)      teaching undergraduate courses in Navajo,

2)      developing Navajo language curricular materials,

3)      advising students pursuing the minor in Navajo,

4)      program recruitment, and

5)      service to the department

Minimum qualifications:

  •        Master’s degree in hand at time of application in Linguistics, Native American Studies, Education, or related field.
  •        Experience teaching Navajo with Navajo as the language of instruction in K-12, college or university settings.

Preferred qualifications:

  •        Demonstrated commitment to diversity, equity, inclusion, and student success, as well as working with broadly diverse communities.
  •        Conversational fluency in Navajo sufficient for teaching environment.
  •        Ability to read and write in Navajo.
  •        Experience in developing curricular materials for teaching Navajo.
  •        Documented experience working in partnership with Navajo educational institutions.
  •        Ability to work effectively with students and colleagues.
  •        Ability to assume administrative duties and to mentor part-time instructors as needed.
  •        Expertise in the use of technology to support instruction.

Date for best consideration: October 26, 2015

Closing date:  Open until filled

Please direct all inquiries to: Professor Mary Willie, mawillie@unm.edu

For details about the application requirements or to apply, visit the UNMJobs website:

https://unmjobs.unm.edu. Please reference Posting Number 0832338.

University of New Mexico is committed to promoting and supporting the diversity of our campuses. UNM is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer.

Black Mesa mines: Native Americans demand return of their ancestors’ bones

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Black Mesa mines: Native Americans demand return of their ancestors’ bones

Navajo and Hopi Nations are fighting for the protection of Arizona burial grounds as one of the world’s largest coal companies seeks extension of its mining permit

The Peabody mine on Black Mesa with reclaimed areas in the background, looking north-west.
 The Peabody mine on Black Mesa. The company is seeking a lifetime mining permit for the lands it leases from Native American tribes. Photograph: Sam A Minkler

In 1967 the Peabody coal company came to the Navajo and Hopi reservations in northern Arizona and Utah to excavate a strip mine – but the land it leased from the tribes was on an ancient tribal burial ground. So, as required by law, it hired archeologists and for the next 17 years a dig known as the Black Mesa archeological project – the largest in North American history – unearthed more than one million artefacts, including the remains of 200 Native Americans.

Now the bones and artefacts are at the centre of a debate between tribes people who say ancestral remains and archeological ruins have been desecrated, and a coal company and government officials who are planning a new dig. Read More