photography

Job – Landed Learning Multimedia Education Assistant, Due: Feb 24, 2017 (deadline extended

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Job Description:

The Intergenerational Landed Learning Project is a unique community education and research project that teams school-aged youth with adult volunteers to build a multigenerational community that learns how to nurture the land and live in balance with the earth, through growing, caring for, cooking, and eating local food.

The Landed Learning Multimedia Education Assistant will use a variety of media (visual, written, and digital) to support the academic, programmatic, research, and fundraising objectives of the Intergenerational Landed Learning Project (ILLP). The Multimedia Education Assistant will develop multi-media educational programming for participants in the Landed Learning Project, as well as integrate multi-media into the communications strategy for the Landed Learning Project. By using multimedia, the student will help participants deepen, enhance, and solidify learning, as well as cultivate enthusiasm for gardens-based learning among the wider community.

The student must be able to commit to being available Wednesday and Thursday mornings, 9am-Noon.

Hourly wage: $16.41

10 hours/week

March-June 2017

The responsibilities include:

Designing and implementing media education programs within the framework of the Project

  • Develop and facilitate photography workshops for elementary program participants in the garden
  • Develop and facilitate blog training workshops for elementary program participants to share their garden-based learning experiences
  • Provide on-going support youth to document their experiences and learning through photography, writing, and photo journalism

Managing the Project’s photography equipment, photos, and other data archives

  • Maintain and troubleshoot program cameras used by program participants
  • Liaise with ILLP teachers to facilitate ongoing documentation, data collection, and reporting of student activities within participating classes
  • Organize, maintain, and archive ILLP documents (e.g. Photographs, surveys, consent forms, volunteer criminal record checks, volunteers hours)

Developing and managing the Project’s communication strategy

  • Document ILLP visits and events through digital photography
  • Select and provide photos for communication and outreach on social media and print materials Student Job
  • Liaise with Web Assistant to design a visual appealing and informative website, relevant to stakeholder audiences (educators, volunteers, parents, students, and funders)
  • Manage social media (Facebook page and blog) to keep stakeholders connected with the Project through a consistent and dynamic on-line presence

Supporting Program Manager and other program activities as needed

Qualifications:

  • Must be a UBC Student
  • Must be available Wednesday and Thursday mornings, 9am-Noon
  • Experience developing curriculum and working with children
  • Aptitude in and experience with on-line communications and social media
  • Expertise with digital cameras, iPads, and digital photography for photodocumentation and reporting (Having your own camera is an asset)
  • Ability to communicate with diplomacy and tact with children, community volunteers, staff, teachers, and donors
  • Interest in and respect for people of all cultures and backgrounds
  • Self-motivation, flexibility, and excellent organization skills; ability to identify and prioritize multiple tasks with minimal supervision
  • Ability to work effectively both in a team setting as well as independently; team player
  • Physically healthy and active. Able to work outdoors in all weather conditions
  • Familiarity with, and commitment to the vision and mission of the Intergenerational Landed Learning project is an asset
  • Successful completion of a criminal record check is required

To Apply: Please send Resume, Cover Letter, and Time Table to landed.learning@ubc.ca. Applications must be received no later than February 17, 2017.

Tillikum Lens Photo Exhibition Opening

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Tillikum Lens Photo Exhibition Opening

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Take a walk in my shoes and see the world that I see.

Join us for a photo gallery opening hosted by Tillikum Lens, a program dedicated to empower indigenous youth through image making. Photos that will be displayed were all taken by youth, with the help of experienced instructors who work with local communities and organizations to promote diverse perspectives and cross-cultural understanding.

To learn more about Tillikum Lens, please read the outline.

People are drawn to different mediums for creative purposes. What we saw within our youth that took part in Tillikum Lens is they not only learned to be creative but began to witness the world around them and document it. For a young person who may not feel they have a place, or purpose in this world this is a massive realization, they became aware and, they belong to that moment. That moment they record has a story and now they are a part of it.” – Osoyoos Indian Band

Join us for an evening of creativity, stories and music celebrating indigenous youth.

Open to all ages. Light refreshments will be served.

Register for the event here.

Explore some of the photography: http://tillikumlens.com/

Co-sponsored by Sony Canada, the International Sustainability Education Foundation, the Osoyoos Indian Band and Lil’wat Nation, and the Squamish Nation, and the Liu Institute for Global Issues, UBC.

Location:
Liu Lobby Gallery
Address:
6476 North West Marine Drive

Photography: “These Gorgeous Photographs Show Indigenous Americans Without the Stereotypes”

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These Gorgeous Photographs Show Indigenous Americans Without the Stereotypes
Three years ago, Matika Wilbur set out on an ambitious undertaking: a vast road trip across America to photograph members of all 562 of America’s federally-recognized tribes.

This article appears in Cities Are Now, the Winter 2015 issue of YES! Magazine.

72 Cities Cover

Images of Native Americans made by non-Natives have a problematic history. During the 19th and early 20th centu­ries, ethnographers often used photos to document and romanticize the last traces of the New World’s “dying cul­tures.” Native Americans survived, but the tradition lives on: Posed images and media stereotypes continue to reduce indigenous peoples to vessels for the American imagination.Photographer Matika Wilbur, a member of the Tulalip and Swinom­ish tribes, aims to change this. Three years ago, she set out on an ambitious undertaking, a vast road trip across America to photograph members of all 562 of America’s federally-recognized tribes. (That number is now 566.) The first part of this ongoing project was recently displayed in Wilbur’s first solo museum show, Photographic Pres­ence and Contemporary Indians: Matika Wilbur’s Project 562 at the Tacoma Art Museum in Tacoma, Wash. The show featured 40 portraits chosen from Wil­bur’s collection, which so far includes images from the more than 200 tribes she visited in the course of traveling 80,000 miles around the western United States. A fine art book series is also forthcoming from the University of Washington Press. Read More

Guardians of life: The indigenous women fighting oil exploitation in the Amazon

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On Oct. 12, 2013, a group of nearly 300 women from seven indigenous nationalitiesmarched to Quito, Ecuador, arriving in the capital four days later with theirchildren in their arms, the sharp angles of their faces — young and old — decoratedwith vegetable ink designs, covered in the same strength and determination with which they began their journey. They were marching to Quito to ask the central government to respect their ancestral lands, to refrain from exploiting the oil that lies beneath his Kawsak Sacha, a living jungle. In November of that same year, a smaller delegation of women peacefully protested during the 11th Oil Licensing Round, an auction of 6 million acres of ancestral indigenous land for oil exploitation. The protests, however, turned sour when oil executive and politicians scolded protesters, and Ecuadoran President Rafael Correa subsequently demanded the closing of the NGO Fundación Pachamama and indicted 10 indigenous leaders on charges of terrorism.

While women have always played an active role in historic marches that marked the struggle for the rights of indigenous peoples in Ecuadorthis was the first walkorganized and led by women.

Felipe Jacome’s set of photos AmazonGuardians of Life documents the strugglesof indigenous women defending the Ecuadoran Amazon through portraitscombined with the powerful written testimonies. The words across each photograph are a self-reflection of the lives of women, their culture, history and traditions, and especially about the reasons for fighting oil drilling on their ancestral landsThe color designs framing each portrait use the same natural dyes found in face paint to expand on the symbols and designs that reflect theirpersonalities, courage and struggle.

All photos by Felipe Jacome Read More

Amazon Indian protests outside Jimmy Nelson photo exhibition in London

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Nixiwaka Yawanawá protested against the 'outrageous' exhibition of Jimmy Nelson's work at London's Atlas Gallery today, wearing his ceremonial headdress.

Nixiwaka Yawanawá protested against the ‘outrageous’ exhibition of Jimmy Nelson’s work at London’s Atlas Gallery today, wearing his ceremonial headdress.
© Sophie Pinchetti/Survival

An Amazon Indian protested outside the exhibition of controversial photographer Jimmy Nelson’s work “Before They Pass Away” at London’s Atlas Gallery today.

Nelson’s work has been attacked by indigenous peoples around the world, as well as Survival International – the global movement for tribal peoples’ rights – for portraying afalse and damaging picture of tribal peoples.

Nixiwaka Yawanawá from Acre state in Brazil handed a letter to the gallery and said, “As a tribal person I feel offended by Jimmy Nelson’s work ’Before They Pass Away’. It’s outrageous! We are not passing away but struggling to survive. Industrialized society is trying to destroy us in the name of ‘progress’, but we will keep defending our lands and contributing to the protection of the planet.”

Read the letter to London’s Atlas Gallery (pdf, 10MB)

Famed photographer Jimmy Nelson's work 'Before They Pass Away' has been attacked by tribal peoples around the world.

Famed photographer Jimmy Nelson’s work ‘Before They Pass Away’ has been attacked by tribal peoples around the world.
© Jimmy Nelson/teNeues

While Nelson claims his work is “ethnographic fact”, Survival Director Stephen Corrydenounces it as a photographer’s fantasy which bears little relationship either to how the people pictured look now, or how they ever appeared. Nelson’s subjects are supposed to be “passing away”, but no mention is made of the genocidal violence they are being subjected to. …Read More

Amazon Women on the Frontlines of Climate Change

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SEPTEMBER 23, 2014

A selection of photos from Amazon Women on the Frontlines of Climate Change, a traveling photography exhibit with written and live testimonies from indigenous women leading solutions on the frontlines of the Amazon as the region confronts the impacts of climate change.

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As in other developing countries, women in the Amazon bear a disproportional burden as climate change impacts their traditional territories and environment. It is in the daily lives of these women – who are highly dependent on local natural resources for their livelihood – that the battle to save the family, traditional ways of life and the future of their children is played out. In order to further preserve biodiversity and limit its degradation, indigenous people – particularly women – can and should play a leading role in the global response to climate change. Amazonian women hold a wealth of knowledge and expertise that can be used in climate change mitigation, disaster reduction and adaptation strategies. These brave women are rising to become effective agents of change, and have taken the lead in a rapidly growing movement to protect their rainforest homelands across Ecuador. As female givers of life, the women of the Amazon have felt a great responsibility to lead the fight against impending oil drilling and the destruction of Pachamama, our “life giving mother earth,” and are calling on the world to keep oil under ground in their ancestral lands. Read More…