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Policy

CFP – Native American Track at the Annual Research and Policy Conference on Behavioral Health, Due: Oct 30, 2015

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Greetings Colleagues,
I wanted to make sure you all knew about the Call For Proposals to present at the Annual Conference in Tampa in March. If you are not familiar with this conference, it focuses on connection between research and policy, which is critical for improving the systems and structures so that we can better serve tribal youth and their families. It also supports dissemination of knowledge around best practices.
The Indian Country Child Trauma Center is a partner for the conference in 2016. The deadline for proposal submissions is October 30th and we are preparing a Native American Track that will include keynotes, presentations, and workshops focused on research and/or policy in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities.
Please forward to those that may be interested in presenting and feel free to reach out to me if you have any questions or need special accommodations regarding your submission.
Best,
Jami Bartgis, Ph.D.
President and CEO
One Fire Associates, LLC
241 Kershner Road
Sand Springs, OK 74063

Call for Papers (PDF): 29th Call for papers-9-18-15

US Education Secretary, Arne Duncan redirects state funding intended for correctional programs to pay teachers in most underprivileged communities

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The Atlantic: Education

Teachers vs. Prisons

Arne Duncan may be on his way out, but he’s determined to draw attention to the role of schools in perpetuating—and eradicating—inequality.

WASHINGTON — Outgoing Education Secretary Arne Duncan, in a speech before an audience last week at the National Press Club, announced a new policy to reallocate state correctional-funding dollars to raises for teachers in the nation’s most underprivileged districts.

In what were perhaps his most intentional comments to date on race, Duncan addressed the disparities in educational access and correctional patterns within a decidedly racial framework.

The secretary challenged educators and those to whom they answer to take “an unsparing look at our own attitudes and our own decisions and the ways that they are tied to both race and class.”

“In the wake of Ferguson, Baltimore, and elsewhere, this has become a central discussion for many in America, and rightly so,” said Duncan, who on Friday—days after the National Press Club speech—announced that he’ll be resigning at the end of the year. “Those of us in education simply cannot afford to stay on the sidelines. Let’s recognize upfront that this is one of the hardest conversations that we can have in education.

“Suspensions, expulsions, and expectations for learning track far too closely to race and class,” Duncan continued. “Sometimes the facts must force a tough look inward. This is not just about explicit, obvious bias. Indeed, sometimes when a genuinely transparent moment of bias arises, the whole country stops and takes a breath. A child holds a clock and we see a bomb. But more often, it’s far subtler stuff buried in invisible privileges and expectations that we’re not even aware that we hold.”

“It’s painful to admit to one’s own actions. It’s painful to admit that one’s own actions might be causing harm, particularly for us as educators who come to this work from such an altruistic place,” said Duncan. “It’s difficult work challenging centuries of institutionalized racism and class inequality, but I firmly believe a hard look at ourselves is a critical part of becoming the nation we strive to be — one of liberty and opportunity regardless of circumstances of your birth.”

Duncan proposed a reallocation of funding from the correctional system to the poorest schools in each state “to get great teachers in front of our neediest kids.”

Acknowledging a need for salary increases for all teachers, Duncan suggested that particularly those working in schools in the bottom 20 percent of each state in the most impoverished areas “doing the hard but incredibly important work in those schools” need a boost of up to 50 percent. Teaching is hard work everywhere, he said, but it is particularly harder for teachers at under-resourced schools.

“Everyone here knows it can be challenging to recruit and keep fantastic teachers in the schools where the needs are the greatest,” said Duncan.

“The fact of the matter is, because we’re so property tax-based throughout the nation—not everywhere, there are some important exceptions—but in far too many places the children of the wealthy get dramatically more spent on them than the children of the poor,” he said. “And until we become uncomfortable with that truth, until we really start to believe that black and brown children and poor children actually can contribute to society, we’re going to continue to have huge disparities.”

Acknowledging the “decades of neglect and abuse and mistreatment and non-investment” in communities like Baltimore; Ferguson, Missouri; his native Chicago; and other majority-minority cities and school districts across the country, Duncan said the historically inequitable funding of the public education system in states is doing a disservice to the nation.

“As long as children in Ferguson are getting less than half the money spent on them as children in other communities, we’re going to have real challenges; we’re going to leave a lot of talent on the sidelines and we’re going to lock up far too many young people.”

“The bottom line is that we must do more to ensure that more strong teachers go to our toughest schools and stay for the long haul. Right now, in far too many places, glaring and unconscionable funding gaps create all the wrong incentives,” said Duncan.

But even in states that are said to be doing well, students are still largely underprepared for college, Duncan said. Citing Massachusetts, which boasts the highest performance rates in the country as an example, Duncan revealed that, even in the top education state, roughly one-third of students still require remedial classes once they get to college. If that’s the story in the No. 1 state, Duncan asked, what does that say about two through 50?

“What’s the cumulative impact of such a massive disparity of opportunity over 13 years of a child’s education?” he asked. “The linkage between education, or a lack thereof, and incarceration is powerful.”

Duncan said it is imperative that correctional funds be redirected to ensure that “all students, including and especially students those in low-income communities of color, have access to high standards that align to expectations of the real world, challenging coursework that prepares them for college without having to lose time with remediation.”

The ultimate goal is to “make opportunity real for those who have grown up without advantages,” said the secretary.

“It’s a fight to increase social mobility; it’s a fight for social justice,” he said. “And the stakes could not be higher. For far too many of our children today, this fight could literally mean the difference between life and death.”


This article appears courtesy of Diverse: Issues in Higher Education.

Source: http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/10/arne-duncan-prison-funding/408745/

Indigenous Peoples’ International Roundtable on Forests and Climate Change, Oct. 8, 5-7pm

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YOU ARE INVITED!

Forestry Event Image

Indigenous Peoples’ International Roundtable
on Forests and Climate Change

The University of British Columbia (UBC) Faculty of Forestry and WWF International Forest and Climate Programme are sponsoring an international roundtable to facilitate discussion by Indigenous Peoples’ representatives of the important issues of forests and climate change.

The roundtable will support ongoing preparations by Indigenous Peoples for the Conference of Parties (COP21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in December 2015 as well as beyond.

The roundtable will bring together Indigenous representatives from all regions of the world, including Canada, to strategize on best ways for policy advocacy at the national and international levels.

Open meeting with UBC community

An open meeting with the UBC community and the general public is organized to interact with delegates and share views on forest governance and climate change.

Thursday, October 8, 2015

5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

(Light refreshments at 4:15 – 4:45 pm)

2424 Main Mall, room 1005
Forest Sciences Centre, UBC
Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4

RSVP

Please RSVP by October 1: caryn.horii@ubc.ca

Feel free to forward this invite to friends and colleagues.

CFP – 17th Annual American Indian Studies Association Conference, Due: Oct. 15, 2015

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17th Annual American Indian Studies Association Conference
February 4-­‐5, 2016 — Tempe, AZ

“Native Leadership in Community Building ”

“Native Leadership in Community Building,” is the theme for the 17th Annual American Indian Studies Association conference. With the many challenges native communities and nations are facing, leadership is key to community building. While political officials are seen as leaders, individuals and families are also taking the initiative to transform their native communities and nations for the better. These individuals and families are undertaking work on a number of levels, such as language and culture maintenance/revitalization, health improvement, environmental protection, culturally-­‐based education, and many other pertinent issues, that build strength and capacity in our communities.

This year’s conference looks to examine and initiate discussions about leadership and community building. This includes, however is not exclusive to: language, culture, art, history, environment, governance, gender, sexuality, health, storytelling, education, family, philosophy, policy, and all other topics which would include leadership and community building.

The organizers of the AISA Conference welcome proposals for paper presentations, panel presentations, round table discussions, and workshops.

Consideration will be given to other topics that relate to American Indian issues. Paper/Session/Panel Proposals:

  • Please send paper and panel submissions in a digital format.
  • When submitting a paper, session or panel, please provide the name of the presenter, title,

    session organizer and/or all persons involved, including their role/s. Also, provide their address,

    phone number and email information.

  • Submit the presentation title/s and a 200-­‐word paper abstract, describing the paper, session or

    panel.

  • Please submit proposals by October 15, 2015. Abstracts after this date will only be considered if

    space is available on the program.

    Thank you!

    Please send submissions to:

    Elizabeth P. Martos, Coordinator American Indian Studies
    P.O. Box 874603
    Arizona State University

    Tempe, AZ 85287-­‐4603 480-­‐727-­‐8691
    Email: elizabeth.martos@asu.edu

    PDF Announcement: 2016 CP 17th Annual American Indian Studies Association Conference

Jobs – Several Positions for Doctoral Students in Education

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There are 5 job announcements targeted to education doctoral students below:

1. Postdoc Position: UC Davis School of Education. Please see the linked document outlining an open Postdoctoral Researcher position at the University of California at Davis School of Education.

Bechtel UC Davis SOE Postdoc Ad_Final_8August2015

2. Job Announcement: Indiana University Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.  Please see the linked advertisement for an open rank position in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at Indiana University.

IU_Ed Leadership Faculty Search Description 2015

3. Job Announcement (2): University of Louisville. Please see the linked announcements for two positions at the University of Louisville. One for an Associate Professor and Program Director for P-12 Educational Policy, Leadership and Administration; the other for a Assistant Professor for P-12 Educational Policy, Leadership and Administration.

ELFH-Assist-Prof P-12Admin2015.final

ELFH-Assoc Prof P-12Admin2015.final

4. Job Announcements (2): Vanderbilt University
Two Tenure Track Positions Department of Leadership, Policy and Organizations. Please see below.

Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College
Nashville, Tennessee

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Tenure-Track, Open Rank Faculty Position in Education Policy and Organizations
Department of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations
Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College
Nashville, Tennessee

The Department of Leadership, Policy, and Organizations of Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College invites applications for an open rank tenure-track faculty position in Education Policy and Organizations. We seek a scholar who studies how school organization and organizational structures impact classroom instruction, student and teacher outcomes, and school performance, including attention to inequality and impacts on traditionally disadvantaged or marginalized populations. We are interested in scholars who use an organizational perspective to examine early childhood or K-12 education and educational policies, and/or the pipeline from K-12 to postsecondary schooling. We welcome a variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives, with a preference for researchers making use of mixed methods and/or survey research methods.

Candidates at the associate professor or professor level should have an established program of research and a record of accomplishment in securing external funding. Candidates at the assistant professor level should have a promising program of research that will lead to a high degree of scholarly output and a commitment to seeking external funding. All candidates should have a commitment to excellence in undergraduate and graduate teaching and an interest in working collaboratively with other faculty, students and staff.

The successful candidate will contribute to teaching in both the undergraduate and graduate programs in the department. The mission of the Department of Leadership, Policy and Organizations is to understand and improve the political, economic, organizational, and social contexts in which human learning takes place. The department operates highly regarded graduate programs in K-12, international, and higher education leadership and policy, as well as an undergraduate major in Human and Organizational Development. The start date is August 2016.

Applications
Review of applications will begin October 30, 2015 and will continue until the position is filled.  Applicants should submit: a cover letter addressing their qualifications; curriculum vitae; and the names and contact information of three references. Indicate in your cover letter the position for which you are applying. Electronic submissions are strongly preferred. Please send all application materials to: Tammy Eidson at tammy.eidson@vanderbilt.edu or 414 GPC, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, TN 37203. For inquiries about the position, please contact Jason A. Grissom, Associate Professor and Search Committee Chair, at jason.grissom@vanderbilt.edu.

For information about the Department of Leadership, Policy and Organizations visit the Web site at http://peabody.vanderbilt.edu/departments/lpo/index.php.

Vanderbilt University is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer. Minorities, women, and individuals with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Tenure-Track Assistant Professor
Higher Education Leadership and Policy
Department of Leadership, Policy and Organizations
Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College
Nashville, Tennessee

The Department of Leadership, Policy and Organizations of Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College invites applications for a tenure-track assistant professor with a research agenda focused on the college student experience, broadly defined. We seek applicants whose work is grounded in the social sciences and who study the intersection of higher education institutions and students, and of the formal and informal policies, programs, and practices (whether at the organizational, state, or federal level) that contribute to both student success and failure in higher education. We welcome a variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives and encourage candidates who research the academic, social, and/or economic outcomes of diverse student populations. Candidates must show evidence of a methodologically rigorous, original research agenda that will lead to a high degree of scholarly output. Successful candidates will also demonstrate potential for obtaining extramural funding and teaching excellence. The successful candidate will teach in the student affairs concentration in the higher education degree programs, as well as contribute to the other undergraduate and graduate degree programs in the department. The mission of the Department of Leadership, Policy and Organizations is to understand and improve the political, economic, organizational, and social contexts in which human learning takes place. The department operates highly regarded graduate programs in K-12, international, and higher education leadership and policy, as well as an undergraduate major in Human and Organizational Development. The start date is August 2016.

Applications
Review of applications will begin October 23, 2015 and will continue until the position is filled.  Applicants should submit: a cover letter addressing their qualifications; curriculum vitae; and the names and contact information of three references. Indicate in your cover letter the position for which you are applying. Electronic submissions are strongly preferred. Please send all application materials to: Tammy Eidson at tammy.eidson@vanderbilt.edu or 414 GPC, 230 Appleton Place, Nashville, TN 37203. For inquiries about the position, please contact Christopher P. Loss, Associate Professor and Search Committee Chair, at christopher.p.loss@vanderbilt.edu.

For information about the Department of Leadership, Policy and Organizations visit the Web site at http://peabody.vanderbilt.edu/departments/lpo/index.php.

Vanderbilt University is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer. Minorities, women, and individuals with disabilities are strongly encouraged to apply.

5. Job Announcement: University of Illinois at Chicago, Center for Urban Education Leadership.

The Center for Urban Education Leadership, within the College of Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago, is launching a search for a full-time Visiting Research Specialist. The Center for Urban Education Leadership conducts research and policy work in urban school leadership, urban school improvement, and urban school leadership preparation and development.  The Center is connected with the UIC’s nationally-recognized Ed.D. program, which prepares transformational urban school leaders.

Online Posting: https://jobs.uic.edu/job-board/job-details?jobID=56185

2015 Noted Summer Scholar Public Lecture – Video Online

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2015 Noted Summer Scholar Public Lecture – Video Online

The 2015 Noted Summer Scholar public lecture took place on August 5th. Dr. Claudia Mitchell of McGill University presented Looking at showing: On the politics and pedagogy of exhibiting in order to engage communities and policy makers.

To learn more about Dr. Mitchell and to access the video and information on the lecture, please visit: http://ogpr.educ.ubc.ca/nss2015-publiclecture/.

Settler-Colonialism and Genocide Policies in North America – free public lecture by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz 27 Oct. 15, 7-9 pm

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“Settler-Colonialism and Genocide Policies in North America”

A free public lecture by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz

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27 October, 2015

Location: 1400-1420 Segal Centre, SFU Harbour Centre.

Co-sponsored by SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement, J.S. Woodsworth Chair in the Humanities, and First Nations Studies, and UBC’s First Nations and Indigenous Studies Program and Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies.

Governmental policies and actions related to Indigenous peoples, though often termed “racist” or “discriminatory,” are rarely depicted as what they are: classic cases of imperialism and a particular form of colonialism—settler colonialism. As anthropologist Patrick Wolfe has noted: “The question of genocide is never far from discussions of settler colonialism. Land is life—or, at least, land is necessary for life.” i The history of North America is a history of settler colonialism. The objective of government authorities was to terminate the existence of Indigenous Peoples as peoples—not as random individuals. This is the very definition of modern genocide. US and Canadian history, as well as inherited Indigenous trauma, cannot be understood without dealing with the genocide committed against Indigenous peoples. From the colonial period through the founding of states and continuing in the 21st century, this has entailed torture, terror, sexual abuse, massacres, systematic military occupations, removals of Indigenous peoples from their ancestral territories, forced removal of Native American children to military-like boarding schools, allotment, and policies of termination.

Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz grew up in rural Oklahoma, daughter of a tenant farmer and part-Indian mother. Her grandfather, a white settler, farmer, and veterinarian, was a member of the Oklahoma Socialist Party and Industrial Workers of the World. Her historical memoir, “Red Dirt: Growing Up Okie,” tells that story. Moving to San Francisco, California, she graduated in History from San Francisco State University and began graduate school at the University of California at Berkeley, transferring to University of California, Los Angeles to complete her doctorate in History, specializing in Western Hemisphere and Indigenous histories. From 1967 to 1972, she was a full time activist and a leader in the women’s liberation movement that emerged in 1967, organizing in various parts of the U. S., traveling to Europe, Mexico, and Cuba. A second historical memoir, “Outlaw Woman: Memoir of the War Years, 1960-1975,” tells that story. In 1973, Roxanne joined the American Indian Movement (AIM) and the International Indian Treaty Council, beginning a lifelong commitment to international human rights, lobbying for Indigenous rights at the United Nations. Appointed as director of Native American Studies at California State University East Bay, she collaborated in the development of the Department of Ethnic Studies, as well as Women’s Studies, where she taught for 3 decades. Her 1977 book, “The Great Sioux Nation: An Oral History of the Sioux Nation,” was the fundamental document at the first international conference on Indians of the Americas, held at United Nations’ headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. Two more scholarly books followed: “Roots of Resistance: A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico” and “Indians of the Americas: Human Rights and Self-Determination.” In 1981, Roxanne was invited to visit Sandinista Nicaragua to appraise the land tenure situation of the Mískitu Indians in the isolated northeastern region of the country. In over a hundred trips to Nicaragua and Honduras, she monitored what was called the Contra War. Her book, “Blood on the Border: A Memoir of the Contra War,” was published in 2005. “An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States” was published by Beacon Press in September 2014.

Facebook Event Page: https://www.facebook.com/events/714236692040031/