Practice

CFP – Investigating Our Practices – 20th Annual IOP Conference at UBC. Due: Feb 24

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UBC is hosting the 20th Annual IOP Conference, where practicing teachers, university educators, graduate students and student teachers from different educational contexts (schools, universities and colleges) come together to share their questions, investigations and understandings about their practice.

 

Date: May 6, 2017

Location: Neville Scarfe Building, 2125 Main Mall, UBC

 

Proposals are invited in three formats: submit a proposal for an individual or group session, host a roundtable discussion, or prepare a poster session

Submission deadline: Friday, February 24

For more information, please visit: http://iop.educ.ubc.ca

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Call for Papers, Provoking Curriculm – “Curriculum Encounters”, Due: September 6, 2016

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Provoking Curriculum Call for Papers

“Curriculum Encounters”

February 17-19, 2017

Eighth Biennial Provoking Curriculum Conference

Faculty of Education, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Co-sponsored by CACS (Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies)

 

Provoking Curriculum Call for Papers 2017 (PDF)

We welcome submissions to the upcoming Provoking Curriculum conference. While we invite any and all pieces that address your current work in curriculum studies, we especially invite submissions that speak to “Curriculum Encounters.”  We welcome proposals for: papers and panels; poetry, arts-informed, and performative pieces.

“Curriculum Encounters” attends to how curriculum, never politically neutral nor materially inert nor disembodied, is always ‘in the making.’ We understand ‘making curriculum’ as very different from the notion of curriculum as a “management category” preoccupied with making a “language of input and output within a production system” (Aoki, 2005, p. 271). Instead, we know that ‘making curriculum’ (as well as unmaking it) carries ethical charges, opening ourselves to encounters (past, present, future; expected and unexpected): (1) with a plurality of voices, beings and bodies, which are all in movement, (2) in spaces that may be disciplinary, interdisciplinary or transitional/in between), and that through our encounters (3) affective intensities may be produced, which can 4) inspire new ethical charges.

Therefore, the proposed theme includes the following (4) thematic strands: Plurality, Spaces, Intensities, and Charges.

 

(1) Plurality

Whose voices, beings or bodies need to be considered in our curriculum encounters? As Maxine Greene (and Hannah Arendt) remind us, plurality is “the condition of human action because we are all the same, that is, human, in such a way that nobody is ever the same as anyone else who ever lived, lives, or will live” (Greene, 1995, pp. 155-6).

(2) Spaces

What kinds of curricular spaces (e.g., disciplinary, interdisciplinary, transitional/in between, “places d’accueil”) can be created to be open to a plurality of voices, beings and/or bodies? In what kinds of spaces are curriculum boundaries made and unmade? By whom, where and why? How can such reconfigurations contribute to projects of curricular reconstruction (Pinar, 2011)?

(3) Intensities

Which curricular intensities will conduce to attuning and opening us to plurality and differences? What kinds will produce discomfort and provoke thinking? How can we become better attuned to the “affective discharges of the semiotic” (Lewkowich, 2015, p. 46) including instances “where the body takes over from … words” (Phillips in Lewkowich, 2015)?

(4) Charges

What kinds of curricular charges (e.g., responsibilities, commitments, projects, movements), might emerge from these intensities so as to catalyze consciousness and move us towards more “just and caring” classrooms and curricula (Greene, 1995, p. 167), ones that address such important contemporary issues as sustainability and wellbeing, and that can continually bring us back to the question: “What is the significance of inviting people to take up what really matters to them?” (Chambers, 1998, p. 17).

 

When submitting a proposal, include the following:

 

  • Name & e-mail address for each participant involved in the proposal
  • Institutional affiliation
  • Title of the presentation
  • 250-word abstract with a clear explanation of the presentation format

 

Please submit your proposals by September 6, 2016 to provokingcurriculummcgill@gmail.com.

 

The conference will open Friday evening with a plenary, with sessions running Saturday and Sunday, and concluding Sunday at 3:30 pm. We are anticipating publishing from the conference (e.g., journal issue; edited book): more news at the conference itself!

 

Thank you and we look forward to your submissions!

 

Provoking Curriculum Organizing Committee

Teresa Strong-Wilson (McGill) & Avril Aitken (Bishops), co-presidents of CACS, with Mindy Carter, Margaret Dobson, Christian Ehret, Lisa Starr, Paul Zanazanian (McGill), Sandra Chang-Kredl (Concordia) & McGill doctoral students Mitchell McLarnon, Shauna Rak, Abigail Shabtay, Layal Shuman, & Amarou Yoder; thank you to Shauna for permission to include the ‘provocative’ image included in this Call.

 

http://www.csse-scee.ca/cacs/news_item/provoking_curriculum_studies_2017

 

References

 

Aoki, T. (2005). In the midst of slippery theme-worlds: Living as designers of Japanese Canadian curriculum (1992). In W. Pinar and R. L. Irwin (Eds.), Curriculum in a new key: The collected works of Ted T. Aoki (pp. 263-77). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

 

Chambers, C. (1998). On taking my own (love) medicine: Memory work in writing and pedagogy. Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, 14 (4), 14-20.

 

Greene, M. (1995). Releasing the imagination: Essays on education, the arts and social change.

San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

 

Lewkowich, D. (2015). Reminders of the abject in teaching: Psychoanalytic notes on my

sweaty, pedagogical self. Emotion, Space and Society, 16, 41-47.

 

Pinar, W. (2011). The character of curriculum studies: Bildung, currere, and the recurring question of the subject. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

CFP – English Practice, due January 30, 2015

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Call for Articles 2015

English Practice, the journal of the BC Teachers of English Language Arts, is a peer-reviewed, open access, online publication published twice annually.

Submission Criteria and Guidelines: 

We accept submissions under the following categories:

  • Teaching Ideas (classroom lessons and strategies)
  • Investigating our Practice (teacher inquiry)
  • Salon (Literary & arts-based pieces)
  • Check this Out (book reviews)

Please see our Submission Guidelines below for details about the different categories, criteria and guidelines.

We invite you to submit articles for our upcoming issue:

Starting a Circle: Exploring Aboriginal Education.

This issue is devoted to exploring the vital importance as well as challenges of integrating Aboriginal perspectives, voices, texts, curricula and teaching and learning practices within English Language Arts. We invite educators and scholars from British Columbia and beyond to explore how the First Peoples Principles of Learning are taken up in classroom practices as well as significant issues arising from landmark events and curricular shifts in BC, which reflect larger questions related to the future of Aboriginal Education and English Language Arts.

Topics may include:

  • Reconciliation: What does reconciliation mean in our classrooms? How can we support students in finding their role within reconciliation? What legacies of residential schools remain in BC schools and beyond, and how can we as Aboriginal and non- Aboriginal educators address these in our practices?
  • Aboriginal Content: How do we increase our ability to integrate Aboriginal content throughout our educational practice? How do we work proactively as a professional community towards these ends?
  • Engagment and Inclusion: What approaches support engagement, inclusion, powerful outcomes and greater success for Aboriginal learners in English Language Arts? What practices support increased Aboriginal graduation outcomes?
  • English First Peoples 10-12: How do we meaningfully and ethically integrate First Peoples’ texts and curriculum into our practices? What barriers and tensions exist and how do we address these?
  • First Peoples Principles of Learning: How do we use these in our classrooms to improve learning for all students? How can they guide our course planning and selection/evaluation of classroom resources?

Closing date: January 30, 2015

Contact: Pamela Richardson pamela.richardson@ubc.ca, or Sara Davidsonsarafdavidson@gmail.com

 Criteria for English Practice

English Practice provides you with the opportunity to write and be read. Your viewpoints, lessons, opinions, research (formal or informal) are welcomed in formats ranging from strategies, lesson plans and units, to more formal compositions and narratives exploring big ideas in teaching and learning, to creative writing.

English Practice publishes contributions on all facets of language arts learning, teaching and research, focusing on the intermediate, middle and secondary grades. The journal offers teachers of a practical, user-friendly guide to research-based practices.

We have four sections with the following guidelines to assist you in preparing and submitting your writing:


Teaching Ideas (teaching strategies, lesson plans, unit plans)
Articles should
:

  • have a clear purpose (i.e. articulate specific learning goals for students)
  • acknowledge your perspective/background/role (i.e. grade 6 teacher; have used reading workshops for 10 years; trying to embed more targeted strategy instruction in my teaching)
  • provide a description of instruction that outlines how modeling or scaffolding is used
  • offer specific classroom practices that are grounded in research (backed up with current thinking, research reference(s))
  • be well organized and clear
  • ensure that any student samples, graphic organizers, and/or handouts are readable and reproducible
  • ensure that formative and summative assessment are aligned with instruction
  • include information on any student and/or professional resources that may be useful for readers
  • include a summary and/or reflection

  Investigating Our Practice (action research, reflection on practice over time, narrative)

Articles should:

  • introduce and outline the purpose and process of inquiry
  • explore a big idea in teaching and learning over time
  • acknowledge your perspective/background/role in relation to issues, big ideas, and/or inquiry question(s) (i.e. “I believe in democratic schooling, but I hadn’t recently looked at how what I do was or was not working”; “I have been teaching for 18 years and oral language has always been important to me. However, I want to know how I can help my students actually improve their speaking and listening abilities.”)
  • include reflections made before and after the teaching practice
  • typically be narrative in style
  • relate your own thinking and practice to current thinking and research
  • be well organized and clear
  • include synthesis and/or next steps
  • include a list of references in APA format


Salon (literary and arts-based explorations, or opinion pieces)
Pieces should
:

  • be related to teaching and learning, curriculum theory and philosophy, language and literacy, or English language arts
  • use form effectively
  • be engagingly written (first person, present tense, ideas are effectively linked and language choice heightens meaning)
  • acknowledge your perspective/background/role, especially in opinion pieces


Check This Out (includes reviews, announcements of contests and conferences)
Articles should

  • acknowledge your perspective/background/role (i.e. teach grades 9-12 English; looking for novels related to the theme of…; “I am always looking for new ideas related to diversity in the classroom”)
  • have clearly explained and supported ideas and/or opinions
  • Book, website, or other resource reviews should include a target audience and some ideas for application in the classroom.
  • Authors must not have a personal or a financial stake in what is being announced or reviewed.