Research

CFP – ab-Original Journal of Indigenous Studies and First Nations’ and First Peoples’ Cultures

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ab-Original Journal Cover

ab-Original

Journal of Indigenous Studies and First Nations’ and First Peoples’ Cultures
    • Jakelin Troy, Editor in Chief
      Lorena Fontaine, Editor
      Adam Geczy, Editor
    • Forthcoming 2017
    • Biannual Publication
    • ISSN 2471-0938
    • E-ISSN 2470-6221

ab-Original: Journal of Indigenous Studies and First Nations’ and First Peoples’ Cultures is a journal devoted to issues of indigeneity in the new millennium. It is a multi-disciplinary journal embracing themes such as art, history, literature, politics, linguistics, health sciences and law. It is a portal for new knowledge and contemporary debate whose audience is not only that of academics and students but professionals involved in shaping policies with regard to concern relating to indigenous peoples.

Each issue will consist of 40-50,000 words. All academic articles should be approximately 6-10,000 words long. An abstract of approximately 150 words must accompany each manuscript. All articles and comprehensive review essays will be peer-reviewed. Opinion pieces or short research reports, which are not peer reviewed, should be approximately 1,500 to 3,000 words in length.

To submit an article, please visit http://www.editorialmanager.com/ab-original. The online system will guide you through the steps to upload your article to the editorial office.

Call for Participants – UBC’s Response to Federal Science Review and Innovation Agenda

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Participate in UBC’s Response to Federal Science Review and Innovation Agenda

You are invited to participate in a campus-wide consultation in response to the recently announced federal government panel on innovation and review of fundamental science.  We have arranged roundtable sessions at which we would like to hear your perspectives and advice on UBC’s submission to the two federal initiatives.
Sessions are planned for both campuses, and are open to UBC faculty and staff across all disciplines.

This is an important opportunity for UBC to inform Canada’s approach to research and innovation.  I encourage you to join in this consultation, and thank you in advance for your time to participate.

Register: https://research.ubc.ca/federal_initiatives

Graduate Research Assistant Project: Research in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. Due: Aug 5, 2016

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The UBC Learning Exchange (http://learningexchange.ubc.ca) is seeking a Graduate Research Assistant (GRA) at Master’s or PhD level for one year to provide research support to the Academic Director. 

The Learning Exchange is core to UBC’s Downtown Eastside (DTES) campus and works to engage, inspire and lead local residents, students, faculty and organizations to work and learn together.  This GRA position will focus on issues of research in the DTES.  The project provides an excellent opportunity for a graduate student to develop expertise in community-based participatory research and knowledge exchange involving people who are marginalized and live in an area that has been stigmatized. The graduate student will be responsible for supporting all aspects of the Making Research Accessible initiative.

Hours: 15hrs/week    Pay: $1250 – $1350 per month.     Starting beginning of September

Deadline: Friday, August 5, 2016

Apply: Submit letter of interest and résumé to Dr. Angela Towle, Academic Director (angela.towle@ubc.ca)

Further information: http://learningexchange.ubc.ca/2016/07/19/were-hiring-graduate-research-assistant/

UBC Library Research Commons August Events

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The UBC Library Research Commons has a variety of events happening in August; including Pixelating: A Digital Humanities Mixer every Thursday 12-2PM, and Working Together with the R Study Group on August 19 from 1-2PM.

There are also several consultation and support options available; including Thesis Formatting Support on August 9 and 16, 2016, Citation Management Support consultations on Tuesdays (4-6PM) and Fridays (9-11AM), and Data Analysis Software consults (SPSS) on Fridays (1-2PM). 

Further information and registrations: bit.ly/RCNewsAugust2016

 

Course: Researching in Cross-Cultural and Global Contexts

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EDCP 508 (031): Researching in Cross-Cultural and Global Contexts open to all students

The focus of this advanced research methodology course is to guide students in the design and enactment of cross-cultural research with Indigenous and other marginalized peoples in local and global contexts. While mainstream research primarily privileges the generation of new knowledge, there is growing call for re-generation of the ‘ten thousand different voices’ that still exist on this planet to address global social and ecological injustices and other critical issues facing life on earth. These knowledges are based on millennia of observation and lived experiences that bring together human, non-human and more-than-human intelligences and agencies, gesturing toward radically reimagined and enacted research affiliations, relationships and responsibilities.   

 

This course offers students an opportunity to examine the challenges of conducting research across different worldviews, knowledge systems, languages, geographies, and ecologies. In this era of epistemic hegemony, neoliberalism, global capitalism and climate change, students will consider research method(ologie)s and research projects that promote equity, social and environmental justice, and living in a good way with all our relations. Students will critically reflect on their own philosophical, historical, cultural, epistemological, ontological, and relational life narratives and how they influence the methodological shaping of their own research projects. It is recommended that students come to this course having already completed EDUC 500: Introduction to Research Methodologies.

Winter Term 1, 2016   Day: Monday   Time: 4:40PM – 7:30PM

Professor: Dr. Peter Cole     peter.cole@ubc.ca

SSHERC’s New Guidelines for Merit Review of Aboriginal Research

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Purpose

SSHRC has developed these guidelines to ensure that the merit review of Aboriginal research upholds SSHRC’s principles for merit review. These guidelines are intended to supplement the SSHRC Manual for Adjudication Committee Members, but might also be used by applicants, external reviewers and the postsecondary institutions and partnering organizations that support Aboriginal research.

Context

Aboriginal research is defined under the Definitions of Terms on SSHRC’s website.

Since the early 2000s, SSHRC has promoted research by and with Aboriginal Peoples, having recognized its potential to increase knowledge and understanding about human thought and behaviour, past and present, and to help create a better future.

The Guidelines for the Merit Review of Aboriginal Research further ensure that Aboriginal research incorporating Aboriginal knowledge systems (including ontologies, epistemologies and methodologies) is recognized as a scholarly contribution and meets SSHRC’s standards of excellence. The guidelines are also designed to encourage that Aboriginal research be conducted with sensitivity, and only after consideration about who conducts the research and why and how it is conducted. The guidelines complement information contained in the second edition of the Tri-Council Policy Statement: Ethical Conduct for Research Involving Humans (TCPS2), and, in particular, Chapter 9: Research Involving the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples of Canada.

These guidelines are relevant for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal researchers who conduct Aboriginal research.

Merit Review Measures in Place

For applications related to Aboriginal research, SSHRC ensures that:

  • external assessors, either Aboriginal or non-Aboriginal, have experience and expertise in Aboriginal research; and
  • when the volume of applications warrants it, adjudication committees are in part or entirely composed of members having community research experience and expertise in Aboriginal research.

SSHRC may solicit external assessments from experts in fields of inquiry relevant to the applications, to aid the adjudication committee in making its decisions.

Key Concepts for the Merit Review of Aboriginal Research

Indigenous or traditional knowledge, according to Chapter 9 of the TCPS2, “is usually described by Aboriginal Peoples as holistic, involving body, mind, feelings and spirit” (p.108). Indigenous knowledge is rarely acquired through written documents, but, rather, a worldview adopted through living, listening and learning in the ancestral languages and within the contexts of living on the land. Engagement with elders and other knowledge holders is acknowledged as valued and vital to knowledge transmission within the context of Aboriginal Peoples living in place. Both Aboriginal knowledge content and processes of knowledge transmission are, thus, embedded in the performance of living, including storytelling, ceremonies, living on the land, the use of natural resources and medicine plants, arts and crafts, singing and dancing, as well as engagement with the more than human world.

Reciprocity is considered an important value in Aboriginal ways of knowing, in that it emphasizes the mutuality of knowledge giving and receiving. In the context of research, and, more specifically, SSHRC’s evaluation criteria, the emphasis on a co-creation model should result in reciprocity in the form of partnerships and collaborative practices, which can include: identification of research objectives and methods; conduct of the research; ethical research protocols; data analysis and presentation; and transmission of knowledge. It also recognizes that access and benefits are, thus, integrally connected.

Community, in the context of Aboriginal research, can refer to places or land-based communities, as well as thematic communities and communities of practice. Furthermore, community-based, community-initiated and community-driven research can involve varying degrees of community engagement; the research outputs will be negotiated taking into account the interests of relevant Aboriginal community members.

Respect, relevance and contributions are important considerations in the merit review of Aboriginal research. Applications should demonstrate that the proposed research identifies and respects relevant community research protocols and current goals, as well as the contributions to and from the community that are likely to emerge or are in place. A respectful research relationship necessitates a deep level of collaboration and ethical engagement. This may include engaging with existing, distinctive research processes and protocols for conducting ethical research reviews in the community; learning within language and/or traditional knowledge systems; collaboratively rebuilding or revitalizing processes that have been displaced or replaced; and/or codeveloping new processes, based on the community’s expressed interests. Finally, this level of collaboration and engagement may also require additional, targeted consultative or review processes.

The following points are intended to assist committee members when reviewing Aboriginal research proposals.

Committee members evaluating research grant applications should use the following list of considerations in relation to the specific evaluation criteria used in assessing grant proposals (i.e., Challenge, Feasibility and Capability).

Committee members evaluating applications for fellowships and scholarships should use the following list of considerations in their review of proposed programs of study or programs of work, as well as in their general assessment of a candidate’s academic capability. While some of these considerations relate more strongly to aspects of SSHRC’s grants programming, they also offer relevant guidance for the review of proposals for doctoral and postdoctoral support.

1. Challenge—The aim and importance of the endeavour:

  • Given the emphasis placed on lived experience, both written and oral literature are appropriate forms of knowledge for consideration. Examples of oral literature can include interviews or personal encounters, or traditional teaching with elders.
  • Theoretical framework and methodology may be combined. For example, in storytelling, the stories represent in some instances both theory and method, a way of explaining phenomena or illustrating how behaviour or actions contribute to living in a good way.
  • Community involvement and the co-creation of knowledge, as appropriate, are considered essential, especially in data interpretation. In this context, the co-creation of knowledge could include interpretative approaches that are jointly developed, reviewed and confirmed by and with community members or their community-delegated organization.
  • Where appropriate, priority should be given to Aboriginal students and postdoctoral researchers when training opportunities are offered.

2. Feasibility—The plan to achieve excellence:

  • The research should address the needs of each partner, if applicable, and demonstrate how the research meets these identified needs.
  • The application should demonstrate how outputs will be made available to, and potentially used by, Aboriginal Peoples and other stakeholders, with community benefits configured into the research outputs. Examples of outreach may include: websites, videos, presentations, artistic or community exhibits, performances, or festivals.
  • The availability and nature of organizational or administrative infrastructure varies from community to community. This aspect should be considered in the structuring of the research in ways that acknowledge and maximize the contributions of a community partner organization.
  • Where required by the funding opportunity, the leveraging of cash and/or in-kind support from host institutions and partners can include social capital, an asset that may emphasize social and familial relationships and networks and may affect the cost of research. Furthermore, linguistic capital, the ability to engage in the community with the ancestral language(s) of the community and a national language of Canada, can also be considered as a contribution.
  • Expectations about the management and governance of the coproduction and outputs of knowledge and related support, during and beyond the award, should be outlined.

3. Capability—The expertise to succeed:

  • The career and academic stages, as well as the rates of research and publication contributions, of applicants and team members need to be reviewed with respect to the following considerations:
    • Aboriginal scholars may have had to start their academic path later in life, or have had interruptions.
    • For some scholars, there are expectations that they significantly contribute to and engage with their home community.
    • Applicants’ accountability to their postsecondary community is also important, as demonstrated by Aboriginal scholars providing support that could include providing student support, teacher training, committee work, and cultural sensitivity training to non-Aboriginal scholars; and contributing to the incorporation of Aboriginal knowledge systems, language, culture and experiences into their postsecondary institutions, including through the creation of associated programs.
    • In the Special Circumstances section, reviewers should take into account the degree of difficulty in an applicant’s career as a useful measure of merit, especially where they have succeeded in overcoming career obstacles.
    • The relevant experience of Aboriginal scholars should take into account the life/knowledge journey of individuals.
  • Collaborators who are considered to have a strong role and community connection should be regarded favourably in the review of Aboriginal research. In particular, elders and community-based partners need to be recognized and respected in terms of their contribution of knowledge assets.

Source: Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. Guidelines for Merit Review of Aboriginal Research Retrieved from: http://www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca/funding-financement/merit_review-evaluation_du_merite/guidelines_research-lignes_directrices_recherche-eng.aspx on August 1, 2016

Funding: BC Council On Admissions & Transfer (BCCAT). Due: Sept 29, 2016

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Send on behalf of Dr. Robert Adamonski, Director of Research and Admissions: 

BCCAT is calling for research project proposals on Contemporary Issues in Student Mobility: http://www.bccat.ca/research/call

 
If you are interested in proposing a research project on a topic within the BCCAT mandate, please send a brief letter of intent by September 29, 2016 to Anna Tikina (atikina@bccat.ca). No need to wait until September to express interest – the letters of intent will be considered as they arrive. 
 
If you know someone who might be interested in proposing a project, please feel free to share this notice. 
 
Please do not hesitate to contact Anna (atikina@bccat.ca, or 604-412-7680) if you have questions about the Call. 

Call for Participants – Paths to Sustainability: Creating Connection through Place-based Indigenous Knowledge

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Call for Participants

Paths to Sustainability: Creating Connection through Place-based Indigenous Knowledge

Seeking people to participate in a Vancouver-area research project on Indigenous world view, Place-based education and the practice of sustainability. This is for a research study conducted by Celia Brauer, a Graduate Student in Socio-cultural Anthropology at the University of British Columbia.

Participants must be available: Aug 2016 – Nov 2016 for 5, 5 hour Sessions, on weekend afternoons.

Plus: pre-and post-interview sessions of about 2 hours.

Participants must be 19 years or over and able-bodied. They should be interested in the subject matter and follow the whole course of educational sessions, plus all the interviews: approx. 25 hours total.

Contact Information: Co-Investigator: Celia Brauer: celiabrauer@alumni.ubc.ca

 

Invitation to Participate in a Needs Assessment Survey on the Needs of Aboriginal Youth and Families Living with FASD

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Hello, my name is Billie Joe Rogers, I am a graduate student at Simon Fraser University and an Ojibwe member of Aamjiwnaang First Nation. I am a PhD student at SFU in the department of Psychology, and am conducting a study to better understand the needs of Aboriginal youth and families living with FASD.
I am looking to hear from those who can speak about the needs of Aboriginal youth and families living with FASD – the survey is open to anyone in BC.
The purpose of the survey is to learn about the support needs of Aboriginal youth and families living with FASD. The survey will ask about the top needs in different areas (e.g., school needs, needs in the assessment process), what services are available and what services are missing, but needed in your community.
The information you provide in this survey will be used to inform an evaluation of a current project working to support Aboriginal youth and families living with FASD. Because the goal is that this survey will contribute to a comprehensive assessment of needs, the questions are mostly qualitative and it is expected that the survey will take approximately 60 minutes to complete.
 
For participation in the survey, your email will be entered into a draw for one of these prizes:
  1. Grand prize: a $250 Apple gift card
  2. Second prize: one of two $100 Apple gift cards
  3. Third prize: one of nine $50 Apple gift cards.
The survey is available now, and will close on June 15, 2016. The survey link is:  http://fluidsurveys.com/surveys/reciprocal-consulting/needs-assessment-supporting-aboriginal-youth/
I have also attached a pdf invitation to participate in the survey.
Thank you for your help in gathering this important information!
Thank you,
Billie Joe

Public Scholars Initiative, Due: May 16, 2016

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Deadline

Monday, 16 May 2016

Annual Value

Up to $10,000

Citizenship

Canadian
Permanent Resident
International

Degree Level

Doctoral

This award is part of the UBC Public Scholars Initiative, which intends to build connections, community, and capacity for doctoral students who are interested in explicitly linking their doctoral work to an arena of public benefit and integrating broader and more career-relevant forms of scholarship into their doctoral education process.

Up to $10,000 per student is available to support innovative/collaborative scholarship which the student would otherwise be unable to pursue. Funding can be used for:

  • Student stipend, if the student’s current funding source would not allow the alternative project(s)
  • A research allowance (including allowance for professional development or travel relevant to the scholarly work)

Funding is available for up to 30 new students in 2016-17. Students may be eligible for renewal for a second year (pending new PSI funding).

Listen to the PSI Info Session, recorded on March 9, 2016: https://www.grad.ubc.ca/awards/ubc-public-scholars-award