residential schools

Facing ‘colonial history’ key for Indigenous youth: Crime Prevention Ottawa

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Broader cultural education could help steer Indigenous youth away from criminal justice system, author says

CBC News Posted: Feb 14, 2017 4:54 PM ETLast Updated: Feb 14, 2017 8:53 PM ET

Melanie Bania presented the results of her study on preventing the criminalization of Indigenous youth at Ottawa City Hall on Tuesday. (Giacomo Panico/CBC )

A renewed focus on broader cultural education that confronts rather than ignores Canada’s “colonial history” could help steer Indigenous youth away from the criminal justice system, according to a new report by Crime Prevention Ottawa.

The report, titled Culture as Catalyst: Preventing the Criminalization of Indigenous Youth, was released during a presentation at Ottawa City Hall Tuesday morning.

Marc Maracle is the chair of the Ottawa Aboriginal Coalition, which helped lay the groundwork and provide background information for the report. (Roger Dubois/CBC)

According to the report, traumatic events stemming from “colonizing policies” such as the residential school system contribute to the disproportionately high rates of poverty, poor education and unsafe housing experienced by Indigenous people in Canada.
As a result, the paper concludes, Indigenous youth and adults are highly over-represented in the Canadian criminal justice system.
“The research also shows that a connection to culture is very important for all young people, but that for Indigenous people in particular that connection to culture is directly linked to their sense of identity,” said Melanie Bania, the report’s author. Read More…

Orange Shirt Day, Faculty of Forestry, UBC – 30 Sept, 2016

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orange shirt day.jpg

Why Orange Shirts?
Orange Shirt Day is a legacy of the St. Joseph Mission (SJM) residential school commemoration event held in Williams Lake, BC, Canada, in the spring of 2013.  It grew out of Phyllis’ story of having her shiny new orange shirt taken away on her first day of school at the Mission, and it has become an opportunity to keep the discussion on all aspects of residential schools happening annually. 

The date was chosen because it is the time of year in which children were taken from their homes to residential schools, and because it is an opportunity to set the stage for anti-racism and anti-bullying policies for the coming school year.  It also gives teachers time to plan events that will include children, as we want to ensure that we are passing the story and learning on to the next generations.


Orange Shirt Day is also an opportunity for First Nations, local governments, schools and communities to come together in the spirit of reconciliation and hope for generations of children to come.

Education of Tribes (Indigenous People) in India: Policies, Programmes and Progress. 10:30am–11:30am, Mar 11, 2016

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Education of Tribes (Indigenous People) in India: Policies, Programmes and Progress

When: Friday, March 11, 2016  |  10:30 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.
Where: Neville Scarfe Building, Room 310

 

k-sujathaThe Educational Administration & Leadership Program (EDAL, Department of Educational Studies), Indigenous Education, and the Faculty of Education Dean’s Office present a seminar by Professor K. Sujatha, Head, Department of Educational Administration, National University of Educational Planning and Administration, New Delhi, India.

Tribes (Indigenous people) in India, who are also called Adivasis (Hindi for “original inhabitants”), constitute 8.9 percent (over 80 million) of the total population of the country and occupy the lowest levels in socio-economic development. There are more than 750 tribal groups with varied socio-cultural traditions. The Constitution of India envisages special measures for socio-economic development of tribes. Consequently both national and state governments have adopted several special policies and programmes for educational development of tribes. This presentation will cover several of these special policies and programmes — including residential schools — for the education of tribes, progress that is being made, and current issues and challenges.

Bio

Professor Sujatha holds a PhD in Educational Anthropology from Andhra University. She has been a Visiting Fellow at New England Univesity in Australia and has consulted with UNESCO, UNICEF, the British Council, the UN Development Programme, and the UN Office for Project Services. She has authored eight books in addition to research papers and articles published in national and international journals. Her specializations include education of disadvantaged groups, educational policy analysis, comparative education in developing countries, and school management.