self determination

Building Legal Colonialism: Liberal Enclosure and Indigenous Self-Determination. 5:30 – 6:30 pm, Jan 10, 2017

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Building Legal Colonialism:
Liberal Enclosure and
Indigenous Self-Determination

An Inaugural Lecture at the
Peter A. Allard School of Law

Professor Gordon Christie’s research focuses on questions of Aboriginal rights. He has published on many of the signal decisions in Canadian Aboriginal law, from Delgamuukw to Tsilhqot’in Nation, and his work explores a broad range of issues, including Aboriginal rights and title, Indigenous sovereignty and self-determination, and processes of consultation and accommodation. As an Indigenous scholar, Professor Christie has been an important voice as well in the development of thinking on Indigenous legal traditions. His most recent project involves an attempt to move beyond the dominant mode of critical analysis with respect to Canadian jurisprudence on Aboriginal rights, which relies on and champions particular, but often conflicting, normative theories of the law to analyse court decisions. His forthcoming book, Making Sense of Aboriginal Rights: An Exercise in Methodological Naturalism, explores the question of how the nature of the law might be theorized in a way that allows for a non-normative description and explanation of the dynamics of Canadian jurisprudence on Aboriginal questions, in terms of the actions of one meaning-generating community—the settler state and its legal institutions—with relation to numerous and varied Indigenous meaning-generating communities.

Professor Christie joined the Allard School of Law at UBC in 2004, serving as Academic Director of the Indigenous Legal Studies Program from 2005 to 2016. Prior to coming to Allard Law he held a faculty appointment at Osgoode Hall Law School (York University), where he was also Director of the Intensive Program in Aboriginal Lands, Resources and Governments. He obtained B.A. in Philosophy from Princeton University, followed by an LL.B. from the University of Victoria and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of California Santa Barbara. At the Allard School of Law, he teaches in the areas of aboriginal law, legal theory, and interdisciplinary perspectives, as well as first-year Torts.

TUESDAY
JAN 10, 2017
5:30 – 6:30PM
Allard Hall,
Franklin Lew Forum
The Inaugural Lecture tradition at the Allard School of Law celebrates the promotion of faculty members to full Professor with a public lecture addressed to the broad themes of their scholarly work.

Reception to follow. Please RSVP
Peter A. Allard School of Law
The University of British Columbia
Allard Hall, 1822 East Mall
Vancouver BC V6T 1Z1
T 604.822.6335
http://www.allard.ubc.ca

Research Assistant, Project on Water Governance and Indigenous Law at UBC. Due: Sept 9, 2016 (12 pm)

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The student research assistant will support projects for the Project on Water Governance and Indigenous Law, a multi-year SSHRC Partnership Grant.

Position will be approximately 10 hours per week from September to December, with the possibility of extension and further research collaboration.

Job Duties:

  • logistics for partner meetings (accommodation, travel, handouts, room arrangements)
  • taking notes -background research including literature reviews and data base assessment
  • logistics for summer meeting
  • social media
  • support for administrative tasks including copy-editing, network building and data assessment Qualifications
  • interest/knowledge in Aboriginal issues, organizations, and resources
  • a solid work ethic
  • strong research skills
  • excellent computer skills including Office, WordPress, and if possible

    Adobe Creative Suite

  • proven written and verbal communication abilities
  • strong interpersonal and organizational skills
  • an ability and willingness to work independently and on a team
  • accuracy and attention to detail in creating and reviewing documents and databases
  • aptitudes in prioritization and meeting deadlines
  • skill in design and layout

    This position is open to upper year undergraduate and graduate students at UBC.

    Please send your cover letter and resume to water.partners@ubc.ca. Deadline to apply: Noon, Friday, September 9th 2016.

CFP – Storying Solidarities: Sites of Autonomy and Alliance in Indigenous Literary Arts, University of Calgary. Due: Feb 1, 2016

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Storying Solidarities:
Sites of Autonomy and Alliance in Indigenous Literary Arts

A Gathering of the Indigenous Literary Studies Association
May 28th-29th, 2016
Academic Congress, The University of Calgary, Treaty 7 Territory

In the Traditional Lands of the Blackfoot Confederacy Calgary, Alberta, Canada

For its second annual gathering, and the first time at Academic Congress, the Indigenous Literary Studies Association seeks to think together about the sometimes conflicted relationship between alliance and autonomy in decolonial struggles as imagined, illustrated, and interrogated through Indigenous literary arts. While terms like “solidarity” and “alliance” tend to be valued as inherently positive, their often vague and uncritical application risks masking and thereby sustaining settler colonial power in ways that might threaten Indigenous autonomy and self-determination.

We invite scholars, knowledge-keepers, artists, and community members to explore the tensions that persist between the generative possibilities of consensual alliance and the ongoing urgency for what Métis artist and scholar David Garneau calls “irreconcilable spaces of Aboriginality”: “gatherings, ceremony, Cree-only discussions, kitchen-table conversations, email exchanges, etc. in which Blackfootness, Métisness, Indianness, Aboriginality, and/or Indigeneity is performed apart from a Settler audience” (33). In particular, we invite participants to consider the ways in which Indigenous literary arts provide tools for imagining and enacting solidarities with genuinely decolonizing potential, while laying bare the ethical dimensions such solidarities demand.

We welcome participants to consider alliance in its multiple and expansive dimensions — among Indigenous nations, between Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists, between Indigenous scholars and the communities with which they identify, between Indigenous decolonization movements and other social justice movements, and between Indigenous literary studies and Indigenous Studies more broadly. We also welcome participants to conceive of literary arts expansively; we welcome discussions of literature, film, theatre, storytelling, song, hip-hop, and other forms of narrative expression.

Prospective participants are invited to propose conference papers, panels, roundtables, workshops, performances, and other formats for special sessions. Sessions will be 90 minutes in duration, including at least 15 minutes for collaborative dialogue. While open to all proposals dealing with Indigenous literary arts, ILSA encourages proposals for sessions and individual presentations that engage with any of the following topics:

  • Autonomy and Alliance in Treaty 7 Territory
  • Confederacy, Intertribal Alliance, and the Literary Arts
  • The Terrain of “Solidarity” in Community-Based Participatory Research
  • What David Garneau calls “Irreconcilable Spaces of Aboriginality”
  • What Leanne Simpson calls “Sovereign Sites of Intimacy”
  • Activist Alliances among Indigenous and Diasporic Artists
  • Kinship and Alliance with the Other-than-Human
  • Art, Autonomy, and Idlenomore
  • Literary Methods and Narrative Arts as Praxis
  • Orality and Solidarity Building
  • Collaborative Creation and Multi-Media
  • Artistic Expressions of Sovereignty and Self-Determination
  • Land-based Solidarities and the Literary Arts
  • Intimacy and Erotics as Expressions of AllianceStorying Solidarities features keynote speakers Eldon Yellowhorn (confirmed) & Leanne Betasamosake Simpson (unconfirmed). The gathering also features the Renate Eigenbrod Memorial Mentorship Lunch, which will connect emerging artists and scholars with established mentors; both mentors and mentees can register for the event by contacting Deanna Reder at dhr@sfu.ca. In collaboration with the Canadian Association for Commonwealth Literature and Languages Studies, this year’s “Aboriginal Roundtable” will bring together artists, activists, and academics who will engage the theme: “Decolonial Solidarities: Ecology, Gender, and Ethical Calls to Action.” Those interested in participating in the roundtable as featured speakers, please contact Sophie McCall at smccall@sfu.ca.Proposals for individual presentations should include the presenter’s name, institutional and/or tribal affiliation, email address, and telephone number; the presentation’s title; and a 250-word abstract that should identify the presenter’s desired format. Proposals for special sessions should include the session organizer’s name, institutional and/or tribal affiliation, email address, and telephone number; a list of confirmed participants’ names and affiliations; the session’s title; a 250-word description of the session’s goals, format, and significance, and 100-word descriptions of each participant’s contribution to the session.

    The deadline for all proposals is February 1st, 2016. All proposals should be sent to ilsaconference@gmail.com.

CFP – pdf file: CFP Storying Solidarities for ILSA 2016

Self-Determination and Self-Defense in Cherán, Michoacán

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Self-Determination and Self-Defense in Cherán, Michoacán

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On December 11, 2012, the US Justice Department announced that banking giant HSBC was immune from prosecution despite overwhelming evidence that they consistently failed to implement controls against money-laundering. Assistant attorney general Lanny Breuer said: “Had the US authorities decided to press criminal charges, HSBC would almost certainly have lost its banking license in the US, the future of the institution would have been under threat and the entire banking system would have been destabilized.”

The entire banking system would have been destabilized?”

orignal article here

 

 

 

About the website:

 

 

 

 

 

 

elenemigocomun.net

began as a bilingual website aimed at spreading awareness about, and solidarity with, social movements in Oaxaca, Mexico. The site was launched to support the 2005 documentary film El Enemigo Común (The Common Enemy) which is an exposé of repression and resistance in Oaxaca. The film documents paramilitary activity against indigenous communities from 2002 through 2005 and provides historical context for the expansion of capitalism and empire in Oaxaca.

The Zapatista rebels of Mexico: 20 years on and in retreat

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Once the delight of the global left, the Zapatistas trust few people and reject the outside world

“The caracoles sport rainbows of murals on wooden buildings that glorify the struggle: Women in masks who form kernels of corn, the Mayan plumed serpent god and the hero of the 1910 Mexican Revolution, Emiliano Zapata, after whom the movement takes its name. But the villages are still poor and are losing numbers to migration.

The bearded man said the Zapatistas decided a decade ago to go it alone after being betrayed so many times before. Heavily indigenous Chiapas has some of the most underprivileged people in the country, who never benefited from the 1910 revolution’s promise for agrarian reform. The Zapatistas were further frustrated when the government failed to deliver on a 1996 accord for greater autonomy and rights that was meant to pacify them. So they seized land — some estimates are as high as 750,000 acres — and created their own schools and clinics, and rejected subsidies from the state.”

 

read more here