technology

CTLT Summer Institute, August 22-25, 2016

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Program + Registration

The week-long CTLT Summer Institute, taking place August 22-25, 2016, is designed for educators who are new to teaching at UBC or are interested in renewing their teaching approaches. Explore and share fundamental teaching and learning practices through workshops and information sessions.

All events are free and take place in the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre (IKBLC) on UBC’s Vancouver Campus.

Schedule of Events

View and register for events below or download the complete 2016 CTLT Summer Institute Schedule of Events.
Schedule of Events (PDF)

Guiding Class Discussions

9:30 am – 11:30 am
IKBLC, Lillooet Room 301

In many disciplines “Discussions” are a critical component of the curriculum. But, how do you facilitate as a TA a discussion effectively to stay on track, to motivate all students to speak and to balance student participation at the same time? Please join us for this interactive workshop to explore and learn more about these topics.
Register >

Welcome to Teaching at UBC

9:30 am – 12:00 pm
IKBLC, Seminar Room 2.22

At this welcome session you will be introduced to what you need to know to teach your first course at UBC.
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UBC Studios Open House

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
UBC Studios, Main Studio, Room 0110

With support from the provost office, UBC Studios has recently setup new educational media support services and studios at no charge for all UBC faculty and staff. This studio tour will introduce you to our current and new services and facility.
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Developing Course Goals and Learning Objectives

1:00 pm – 3:30 pm
IKBLC, Seminar Room 2.22

As you design or redesign your course, have you considered what you intend your students should take away from your course? What they should be able to know/do/feel by the end?
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Developing a Learning-Centered Syllabus

9:30 am – 12:00 pm
IKBLC, Seminar Room 2.22

Your syllabus is an important document that introduces the course and you to the students. It also sets forth your responsibilities and those of your students.
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Approaching Teaching as a Scholarly Activity

1:00 pm – 3:30 pm
IKBLC, Seminar Room 2.22

In this session, the distinctions and similarities between research and teaching as a scholarly activity will be discussed and we will provide some tools to help you move your SoTL project forward.
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Marking Papers and Giving Feedback

1:30 pm – 3:30 pm
IKBLC, Lillooet Room 301

In this workshop, we will review a few strategies that will help you keep your grades consistent, provide feedback that helps students learn from their mistakes as well as their successes, and do it all in a way that saves you both time and energy.
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Teaching with Teaching Assistants (for Faculty)

9:30 am – 12:00 pm
IKBLC, Seminar Room 2.22

In this session, we will explore what instructors and students expect from their TAs, key elements of the TA contract, and how we can enhance the teaching and learning experiences of our TAs.
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TA-Instructor Working Relationships (for TA’s)

9:30 am – 12:00 pm
IKBLC, Lillooet Room 301

In this session we will explore the various needs and expectations (including the TA contract) that structure the TA-Instructor relationship, develop effective communication strategies, including feedback and building professional interpersonal skills, all with the aim of helping you to build a harmonious and rewarding professional relationship with the instructors you work with.
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LT Hub Open House

1:30 pm – 3:30 pm
IKBLC, Seminar Room 2.22

Come and visit the LT Hub staff to learn more about our wide range of services and support. Not sure how learning technologies can support your teaching practice? Talk to skilled and knowledgeable LT educational consultants about integrating learning technologies into your face-to-face, blended or online course.
Register >

 

Giving a Guest Lecture/Presentation

9:30 am – 11:30 am
IKBLC, Lillooet Room 301

In this session, we will provide you with some practical strategies for planning a well-organized presentation that is focused, on point, and memorable. You will also discuss some of the common challenges in giving a good presentation, and develop some strategies you can use to manage anxiety when giving your presentation.
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Assessment and Evaluation

9:30 am – 12:00 pm
IKBLC, Seminar Room 2.22

In this workshop, you will develop a course assessment plan, including both formative and summative assessment, that aligns with your intended course learning outcomes, goals or objectives.
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Participatory Learning Techniques for Flipped and Blended, Face to Face Environment

1:00 pm – 3:30 pm
IKBLC, Seminar Room 2.22

In this workshop, we will guide the reflection, the discussion, and the design of appropriate active learning techniques that are best for the learners, for the courses, and for different learning environments.
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Job – Casual Instructor: Computer Applications, Due: July 17, 2015

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EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

INTERNAL POSTING

Casual Instructor

Aboriginal Tourism Operations (ATO) Program

Main Campus

NEC Native Education College is the largest private Aboriginal college in BC, working with First Nations and Aboriginal organizations to deliver programs in locations throughout British Columbia. We strive to combine academic excellence with a strong commitment to First Nations community-based education and the best practices of adult education. Our programs have Aboriginal content and delivery methods and offer credit transfer to colleges and universities. The ATO certificate program offers students the skills and knowledge to work in the tourism industry. Reporting to the ATO Coordinator, NEC is currently seeking a casual instructor for the course indicated below:

TSM 105 Computer Applications
For course description and further information about the Aboriginal Tourism Program, please visit our website.

Qualifications:

  • Bachelor’s degree in a relevant field is required; possession of a Master’s degree is preferred; 2 years related experience to the course subject matter;
  • Successful instructional experience at the post-secondary level, preferably in hospitality and tourism;
  • Knowledge of and successful experience with Aboriginal adult instructional methodology;
  • Aboriginal ancestry or extensive experience working with Aboriginal organizations;
  • Excellent verbal, written and computer communication skills;
  • An equivalent combination of education and work experience will be considered.

    Terms:

    Appointment to this contract position will require a formal criminal record check, the details of which may preclude an offer of employment being finalized. This position is open to male and female applicants. Preference will be given to qualified Aboriginal applicants. Only short listed applicants will be contacted.

Closing Date: Start Date: Hours: Salary:

Application Details:

Friday, July 17, 2015
Week of July 20, 2015
Mondays and four Tuesdays, 9am-2pm $29.75/hour

Please submit your resume, names of three references from related work experience, copy of your credentials and a cover letter outlining your interest and detailing how you meet the above qualifications. Only short listed applicants will be contacted. Address your application to:

G. Peters, Executive Assistant 285 East 5th Avenue Fax: 604.873.9152
NEC Native Education College Vancouver, BC V5T 1H2 E-mail: gpeters@necvancouver.org

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A Landless Territory: How Do We Articulate Cyberspace Within the Discourse of Indigenous Studies?

Navigating the realm of cyberspace can be challenging – within the field of Indigenous Studies, the topic is delicate but essential. As part of CTLT’s Classroom Climate: Aboriginal Initiatives series, David Gaertner facilitated the session How Do We Articulate Cyberspace (A Landless Territory) Within the Discourse of Indigenous Studies? The session explored examples of Indigenous new media and discussed the importance of analyzing, understanding, and teaching with Indigenous technology.

David, a Postdoctoral Fellow in the UBC First Nations Studies Program, began by addressing the perceived gap between indigeneity and technology. He explained that it is tied to the broader misconception that Indigenous cultural practices are products of the past. In actuality, Indigenous culture is contributing to an exciting and innovative future – Indigenous peoples are not only combining tradition and innovation in technology, but they are also shaping how technologies are developed and utilized. Read More.