Theory

Call for Papers, Provoking Curriculm – “Curriculum Encounters”, Due: September 6, 2016

Posted on Updated on

Provoking Curriculum Call for Papers

“Curriculum Encounters”

February 17-19, 2017

Eighth Biennial Provoking Curriculum Conference

Faculty of Education, McGill University, Montreal, Canada

Co-sponsored by CACS (Canadian Association for Curriculum Studies)

 

Provoking Curriculum Call for Papers 2017 (PDF)

We welcome submissions to the upcoming Provoking Curriculum conference. While we invite any and all pieces that address your current work in curriculum studies, we especially invite submissions that speak to “Curriculum Encounters.”  We welcome proposals for: papers and panels; poetry, arts-informed, and performative pieces.

“Curriculum Encounters” attends to how curriculum, never politically neutral nor materially inert nor disembodied, is always ‘in the making.’ We understand ‘making curriculum’ as very different from the notion of curriculum as a “management category” preoccupied with making a “language of input and output within a production system” (Aoki, 2005, p. 271). Instead, we know that ‘making curriculum’ (as well as unmaking it) carries ethical charges, opening ourselves to encounters (past, present, future; expected and unexpected): (1) with a plurality of voices, beings and bodies, which are all in movement, (2) in spaces that may be disciplinary, interdisciplinary or transitional/in between), and that through our encounters (3) affective intensities may be produced, which can 4) inspire new ethical charges.

Therefore, the proposed theme includes the following (4) thematic strands: Plurality, Spaces, Intensities, and Charges.

 

(1) Plurality

Whose voices, beings or bodies need to be considered in our curriculum encounters? As Maxine Greene (and Hannah Arendt) remind us, plurality is “the condition of human action because we are all the same, that is, human, in such a way that nobody is ever the same as anyone else who ever lived, lives, or will live” (Greene, 1995, pp. 155-6).

(2) Spaces

What kinds of curricular spaces (e.g., disciplinary, interdisciplinary, transitional/in between, “places d’accueil”) can be created to be open to a plurality of voices, beings and/or bodies? In what kinds of spaces are curriculum boundaries made and unmade? By whom, where and why? How can such reconfigurations contribute to projects of curricular reconstruction (Pinar, 2011)?

(3) Intensities

Which curricular intensities will conduce to attuning and opening us to plurality and differences? What kinds will produce discomfort and provoke thinking? How can we become better attuned to the “affective discharges of the semiotic” (Lewkowich, 2015, p. 46) including instances “where the body takes over from … words” (Phillips in Lewkowich, 2015)?

(4) Charges

What kinds of curricular charges (e.g., responsibilities, commitments, projects, movements), might emerge from these intensities so as to catalyze consciousness and move us towards more “just and caring” classrooms and curricula (Greene, 1995, p. 167), ones that address such important contemporary issues as sustainability and wellbeing, and that can continually bring us back to the question: “What is the significance of inviting people to take up what really matters to them?” (Chambers, 1998, p. 17).

 

When submitting a proposal, include the following:

 

  • Name & e-mail address for each participant involved in the proposal
  • Institutional affiliation
  • Title of the presentation
  • 250-word abstract with a clear explanation of the presentation format

 

Please submit your proposals by September 6, 2016 to provokingcurriculummcgill@gmail.com.

 

The conference will open Friday evening with a plenary, with sessions running Saturday and Sunday, and concluding Sunday at 3:30 pm. We are anticipating publishing from the conference (e.g., journal issue; edited book): more news at the conference itself!

 

Thank you and we look forward to your submissions!

 

Provoking Curriculum Organizing Committee

Teresa Strong-Wilson (McGill) & Avril Aitken (Bishops), co-presidents of CACS, with Mindy Carter, Margaret Dobson, Christian Ehret, Lisa Starr, Paul Zanazanian (McGill), Sandra Chang-Kredl (Concordia) & McGill doctoral students Mitchell McLarnon, Shauna Rak, Abigail Shabtay, Layal Shuman, & Amarou Yoder; thank you to Shauna for permission to include the ‘provocative’ image included in this Call.

 

http://www.csse-scee.ca/cacs/news_item/provoking_curriculum_studies_2017

 

References

 

Aoki, T. (2005). In the midst of slippery theme-worlds: Living as designers of Japanese Canadian curriculum (1992). In W. Pinar and R. L. Irwin (Eds.), Curriculum in a new key: The collected works of Ted T. Aoki (pp. 263-77). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

 

Chambers, C. (1998). On taking my own (love) medicine: Memory work in writing and pedagogy. Journal of Curriculum Theorizing, 14 (4), 14-20.

 

Greene, M. (1995). Releasing the imagination: Essays on education, the arts and social change.

San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

 

Lewkowich, D. (2015). Reminders of the abject in teaching: Psychoanalytic notes on my

sweaty, pedagogical self. Emotion, Space and Society, 16, 41-47.

 

Pinar, W. (2011). The character of curriculum studies: Bildung, currere, and the recurring question of the subject. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

A Conversation with Dr. Kim TallBear: An Indigenous Ethic of Relationality

Posted on

Kim TallBear’s forthcoming book, Disrupting Settlement, Sex and Nature: An Indigenous Logic, offers an alternative framework to such settlements and binaries—that of purposeful, responsible migration and boundary crossing (which can also be viewed as a form of critical and mindful promiscuity), or routedness through place, knowledge/disciplines, and intimate relations with both humans and landscapes. The concept of relations—rather than nature or sex—is central. This ethic of relationality will be the central point of this conversation.

Tuesday, February 23, 4 – 5:30 PM
Sty-Wet-Tan Great Hall, Longhouse

RSVP via email to fnis.arts@ubc.ca by 4 PM, February 19. Indicate any food allergies in your RSVP.

Source: The Talking Stick: News and Information from the First Nations Longhouse, February 15, 2016

Theoria & Praxis Call for Submissions

Posted on Updated on

Theoria and Praxis: International Journal of Interdisciplinary Thought

Call for Submissions

Deadline: April 30, 2014

The Idea of Human Rights

Human rights have become a dominant political discourse in the 21st century. Its impact has been felt across the globe and has become irretrievably bound up with issues of development, social justice, racial and gender equality, and sexual orientation. The purpose of this Theoria and Praxis issue is to ask a series of questions meant to interrogate the very foundations of the notion of human rights.

Topics open to participants include, but are not limited to, the following:

*       What are the intellectual groundings of human rights?

*       What is its connection to the history of liberalism and liberal democracy?

*       Are human rights in contradiction with the economic, social and political structures of society?

*       What is the fate of human rights in the “developed world?”

*       Can human rights provide a legal and philosophical framework for the “development” of societies?

*       Are human rights a problematic category? That is, do they distract and draw attention away from the harsh realities of politics, economics and cultural difference? Do they, in other words, reflect a dominating Western discourse?

*      Are they a continuation of an imperial project designed to surreptitiously inculcate a set of hegemonic practices and institutional frameworks?

Contributors are also asked to think of human rights as open to a fundamental philosophical and social scientific questioning. That is, are human rights justified by and through human nature? Are they a remnant of a religious worldview? Or do they represent, in light of the recent anniversary of UN Charter of Human Rights, the advent of a new form of governance and politics that is meant to deeply impact and change the nature of societies in the 21st century and beyond?

Neither are submissions, by any means, to be confined to these questions alone.

In fact, we will gladly and seriously consider all papers that we receive.

Manuscripts shall be subject to a double-blind reading, ensuring the integrity of the peer-review process. All submissions should be between 6,000 and 12,000 words, and include abstracts of no more than 200 words (in Microsoft Word file format).

We welcome those interested to please submit their papers and proposals, and all relevant inquiries, to Theoria and Praxis at: theoriapraxis@yorku.ca

Deadline: April 30, 2014

Theoria and Praxis is edited by Paul A. Brienza and Yasar Bukan. For further information please visit http://theoriapraxis.yorku.ca