Traditional knowledge

Aboriginal Mapping Network

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About

The Aboriginal Mapping Network (AMN) was established in 1998 as a joint initiative of the Gitxsan and Ahousaht First Nations and Ecotrust Canada. Over the years the network has grown from its humble beginnings as a knowledge sharing forum for local First Nations technicians, leaders and decision makers to become a valuable strategic resource for practitioners of traditional knowledge mapping around the world. The AMN now has a mandate to support aboriginal and indigenous peoples facing similar issues, such as land claims, treaty negotiations and resource development, with common tools, such as traditional use studies, GIS mapping and other information systems.

Mapping Resources

Mapping Resources contains information to help with mapping projects:

Call for Papers -Native Traditions in the Americas Group (AAR)

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Native Traditions in the Americas Group, American Academy of Religion.

Questions can be directed to Michelene-Pesantubbe@uiowa.edu or mzogry@ku.edu.

Michelene Pesantubbee, University of Iowa

Michael Zogry, University of Kansas

co-Chairs, Native Traditions in the Americas Group

 

General Questions about the Call for Papers? Read the General Call Instructions.

Questions about the PAPERS System? Read the PAPERS Instruction Manual.

Ready to submit your proposal? Go to the My Proposals page to get started!

The deadline for proposal submission is 5:00 PM EST, Monday, March 3.

 

Native Traditions in the Americas Group

We invite individual paper and group proposals on any aspect of Native traditions in the Americas (North, Central, and South). We especially encourage proposals in the following areas (topics not listed in order of importance):

•Native religious traditions or issues in Central or South America or in the Southwestern United States, including those in the San Diego area, either a) during any era, or b) for a possible cosponsored session with the Religion in Latin America and the Caribbean Group, specifically Mesoamerican and Indigenous Latin American religion and ritual in the precolonial and early colonial periods

•Native religious traditions in the Americas and peacemaking (for a possible cosponsored session with the Religions, Social Conflict, and Peace Group)

•Native traditional knowledge and the environment, including climate change (for a possible cosponsored session with the Religion and Ecology Group)

•Religious significance of or issues concerning oceans, waterways and watersheds

•Native religious traditions and architecture, including traditional homes

•Native religious traditions and gender roles

•Indigenous concepts of power

Mission Statement:

This Group sees its mission as the promotion of the study of Native American religious traditions and thereby the enrichment of the academic study of religion generally, by engaging in discourse about culturally-centered theories and encouraging multiple dialogues at the margins of Western and non-Western cultures and scholarship. The Group is committed to fostering dialogue involving Native and non-Native voices in the study of North, Central, and South American Native religious traditions and to engaging religious studies scholarship in robust conversation with scholarship on other facets of Native cultures and societies.

Meeting Location

The 2014 AAR and SBL Annual Meetings will be held November 22-25, in San Diego, California. Registration and the Exhibit Hall will be located in the San Diego Convention Center. Academic sessions will be held in the Convention Center, the Hilton Bayfront, and the Marriott Marina. The Employment Center will be located in the Grand Hyatt. Registration and housing for the Annual Meeting will open in March.

Edited Collection: Call for Chapter Abstracts

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Due: January 15, 2014 

Towards a Transformative Approach to Gender and Food Security in Low-Income Countries 

Editors 

John R. Parkins, University of Alberta, jparkins@ualberta.ca

Jemimah Njuki, International Development Research Centre, jnjuki@irdc.ca

Amy Kaler, University of Alberta, akaler@ualberta.ca

Introduction 

Gender inequity is linked to food insecurity. Research shows that women are at the heart of agricultural processes, carrying out the majority of the agricultural and agro-processing labor. For instance, in Tanzania, women account for about 50% of the total waged agricultural labor force (FAO 2011), but even this figure severely understates women’s contributions because of the unaccounted and unpaid hours women work at home producing and processing food production for their families. Constraints on women are therefore roadblocks toon food and nutrition security. When women have equal access to productive resources and assets, everyone benefits. For example, a study in Ethiopia found that women who were provided with the same level of productive resources as male farmers increased their yields by 22% (Boon, Ogato and Subramani 2009). Similarly, the Food and Agriculture Organization (2011) suggests that equal distribution of assets would increase food productivity by 20-30% and reduce the number of hungry people by close to 17%. In response to such findings, national governments and donors have directed funding to research and development programs which integrate gender into research and which set gender equity as an explicit goal of interventions.

Such interventions can address both practical and strategic gender interests (UNESCO 2005, Molyneux 1985). In practical terms, these interventions can provide women with the capacity to meet the long-term nutritional needs of their households, and to enhance their economic well-being. In strategic terms, these interventions may have the potential to enhance the transformation of gender relations towards greater equity by enabling women and men to reflect on gendered divisions of labor and resources related to food, and to reshape these divisions in ways which benefit families and communities. Research and interventions using such an approach aims to facilitate more gender-equitable relationships between men and women and address the underlying social, structural and political causes of gender inequality. Such

transformative approaches contrast with analytical approaches that simply identify barriers or tabulate numbers of men and women involved in project activities. The process of engagement with strategic gender interests is not well established, and is still emergent in the realm of agriculture.

This collection aims to document the ways that food security interventions have addressed both practical and strategic gender interests by: documenting the ways that food security and gender inequity are conceptualized within interventions, assessing the impacts and outcomes of gender-responsive programs on food security and gender equity; and extending the global conversation on gender and food security in the direction of strategic and transformative practices.

In 2009, Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC) and Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada launched the Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF) to increase the contribution of Canadian and developing country research expertise toward solving global problems of food insecurity through applied, collaborative, results-oriented research. To date, the Fund has supported 21 large applied agriculture and nutrition research consortia in 20 countries.

The idea for this collection arose from CIFSRF’s goal to find ways to ensure that women contribute to and benefit from food security programs and interventions, and that its projects contribute to gender equity, as well as enabling communities to meet their nutritional needs. This call for abstracts is directed primarily at projects funded by IDRC, although the editors will consider contributions from other research and intervention projects.

We invite contributions which address the lessons learned from implementing food security interventions with concern for gender equity, as well as contributions which consider how agriculture and nutrition interventions might lead to transformations in gender relations.

Scope of this collection 

The first part of the collection will contain conceptual and methodological papers and best practices for integrating gender considerations in agriculture, food and nutrition security. The second part will include empirical case studies which present evidence on the outcomes and impacts of food security interventions on women and men across the global south. The third part, looking towards the future, will focus on policy, research and programming implications of bringing gender transformative approaches into the mainstream of agriculture and food security research interventions.

We are seeking papers which address the following questions:

Part 1: Concepts and Strategies: 

 What conceptual / theoretical approaches to gender and food security can lead to changes in both practical and strategic gender interests?

 How does strategic or transformative research differ from business-as-usual (or purely analytical) approaches to studying gender?

 What challenges and limitations affect the integration of gender equity into agriculture and food security research programs?

 What controversies or sensitivities can emerge in the context of gender-sensitive interventions?

 How can we integrate strategic or transformative gender concerns into detailed empirical analysis?

Part 2: Case Studies and Practical Results 

 What key approaches have been used for addressing gender interests in agriculture and food security programs?

 What have been the outcomes and impacts of using these approaches? What have been the changes in food and nutrition security, livelihoods and gender equity?

 How are gender-sensitive research and interventions introduced and received at the grassroots?

 What do specific cases tell us about the opportunities, challenges and limitations of addressing gender inequities through research and intervention in food security? What can we learn from successful and not-so-successful efforts to address gender inequities in agriculture and food security research?

Part 3: Towards the Future: 

 Can gender relations be transformed through research and intervention?

 What would a 21st century agenda for gender equity in food security look like?

 What are the limits to research and intervention in transforming communities?

 How can funders, implementers, researchers and community members find common ground on gender transformation?

 What kind of partnerships and capacities will be required for the implementation of a gender transformative agenda in food security research?

Guidelines for contributions 

We are seeking contributions of extended abstracts (2-3 pagers) for papers that are based on practical, strategic or transformative aspects of gender and food security. For field research and practical case studies, we welcome papers that address how gender is integrated in agriculture and food security research programs and that report evidence of outcomes and impacts on gender equity, food and nutrition security and livelihoods. The papers should also have practical implications for policy, practice and research.

Papers will be reviewed based on:

 Clear demonstration of relevance of the paper to food security challenges of men and women

 Clear demonstration of innovativeness in methods and approaches and extent to which the paper advances knowledge or addresses knowledge gaps on gender and food security

 Conceptual soundness

 Robustness of methodology, research design and quality of evidence

 Contributions of the research to food security, gender equality and empowerment of women

Chapter abstracts are due on January 15th 2014. 

Abstracts submission is open to IDRC funded food security programs and others working on gender, agriculture and food security. Preference will be given to IDRC funded programs, although manuscripts from non-IDRC funded and commissioned chapters will also be considered.

Following the abstract deadline, the editors will notify the authors of the chosen abstracts. Authors will be invited to present complete first drafts of their papers (5,000 – 7,000 words) at an international conference and a writer’s workshop sponsored by CIFSRF and the University of Alberta in May 2014. Invited authors will receive travel support to attend this conference / workshop. The editors will work with selected authors to revise their drafts towards final versions.

The editors plan to submit the collection to an academic press by the end of August 2014 with a potential publication date of March 2015.

Send abstracts to John Parkins (jparkins@ualberta.ca)

Sponsorship 

The Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF) is a program of Canada’s International Development Research Centre (IDRC) undertaken with the financial support of the Government of Canada provided through Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada (DFATD).

Call for Presenters – Integrating Indigenous Traditional Culture and Practices in Health Care

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presented by Indigenous Gatherings

February 18th – 19th 2014 – Calgary, Alberta, CANADA

Call for Workshop Proposals – Deadline November 22nd, 2013

 

The “Integrating Traditional Indigenous Culture and Practices into Health Care Conference” is designed to facilitate the transmission of knowledge between indigenous peoples. We extend a heartfelt invitation to our indigenous partners to share knowledge that will contribute to the well-being of our Indigenous Peoples. We are also aware that many non-indigenous persons have made significant, meaningful contributions in health care delivery and we also invite these presenters to submit their proposals, provided that explicit permission of the indigenous group/organization that one is representing has been obtained.

Ultimately, each presenter is responsible for their own presentation. Please come to our conference with respect for each other. Indigenous Gatherings is promoting workshops that embrace Indigenous Knowledge. Presenters are encouraged to provide strategies that are practical and immediately applicable. All workshops will be 1–1.5 hour long including time for questions and discussions.

All presenters and co-presenters must pay registration fee. Complete and submit a separate registration form for each presenter/co-presenter.

Handouts: Power point presentations, handouts, must be pre-sent via email to  igatherings@gmail.com to be included in the Conference Binder. You will be notified on the number copies of materials for participants. Copy services will NOT be available at the site.

 

Email: igatherings@gmail.com

Website: www.indigenousgatherings.ca

Tenure-Track Assistant/Associate Professor Position in Indigenous Education – College of Education, University of Arizona

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The internationally recognized Language, Reading and Culture (LRC) program in the department of Teaching, Learning and Sociocultural Studies (TLS) at the University of Arizona (UA) announces an Assistant/Associate professor position in Indigenous Education effective August 2014. The UA not only lies in a dynamic transnational border region, but in close proximity to rich Native American cultures, including 22 federally recognized tribes in the state of Arizona. Native American students on the UA campus represent over 75 Native American tribes with the majority coming from Arizona tribes and reservations. As a land grant institution, the UA has an important responsibility to Native American students and Nations. With the current open position, the College of Education at the UA seeks to further strengthen our undergraduate and graduate programs with the integration of Indigenous knowledge systems, epistemologies, and decolonizing research methodologies.

This position offers an opportunity to join a department comprised of two outstanding programs: Language Reading and Culture (LRC) and Teaching and Teacher Education (TTE). TLS faculty engage in interdisciplinary research and teaching, and demonstrate a deep commitment to social justice. TLS provides a collaborative work environment for faculty research and grant development and encourages cross-program and cross-departmental research initiatives, along with opportunities of collaboration across the college and the university. Existing faculty research and teaching interests in the area of Indigenous education include Indigenous youth language learning and practice; maintenance and revitalization of Indigenous language and culture; transnational Indigenous teacher education efforts; and Indigenous knowledge systems, including Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) systems. Additional faculty areas of expertise and interest across the department include multicultural, multilingual and multiliteracy education; anthropology and education; immigrant education; applied linguistics; language policy and planning; literacy processes and pedagogy; early childhood education; world children’s and adolescent literature; STEM education; technology and literacy; teacher education; and environmental learning and sustainability education.

Applications are now being accepted and will be reviewed starting on November 15, 2013. Review will continue until the position is filled.

For more information, please refer to the full posting:  Indigenous ed position_FINAL_POSTED