University of British Columbia

Job – Assistant Professor, History of First Nations Art and Cultural Practices, UBC, Due: Jan 5, 2016

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Assistant Professor in the History of First Nations Art and Cultural Practices Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory
The University of British Columbia

The Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory invites applications for a tenure-track appointment at the rank of Assistant Professor in the field of the History of First Nations Art and Cultural Practices. Ability to teach the history of indigenous arts from the Pacific Northwest is required. The successful candidate will be an active scholar in the most advanced theoretical and methodological concerns of the field.

UBC, one of the largest and most distinguished universities in Canada, has excellent resources for scholarly research. The Art History program partners with a strong Visual Art and Critical and Curatorial Studies programs (www.ahva.ubc.ca). This position in Art History also presents an opportunity to engage with an interdisciplinary group of scholars within the larger academic community, including the First Nations and Indigenous Studies program, the Museum of Anthropology, the Law Faculty, and the Institute for Gender, Race, Sexuality and Social Justice. In addition there is an active community of First Nations artists working in Vancouver.

The successful candidate must have a PhD and is expected to provide strong evidence of active and excellent research, and to demonstrate a record of, or potential for, high quality teaching at the undergraduate and graduate levels. He or she will be expected to maintain an active program of research, publication, teaching, graduate supervision, and service.

Applicants should apply through the UBC Faculty careers website: http://facultycareers.ubc.ca/22012. Submissions should include a letter of application; a detailed curriculum vitae; statement of research and teaching philosophies; a sample dissertation chapter or scholarly paper; evidence of teaching potential and effectiveness. Applicants should arrange to have three confidential letters of reference submitted by email to: ahva.head@ubc.ca, or by mail to: Professor Scott Watson, Chair, Art History Search Committee, Department of Art History, Visual Art and Theory, University of British Columbia, 400-6333 Memorial Road, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z2, Canada. The anticipated start date of employment is as early as July 1, 2016.

UBC hires on the basis of merit and is committed to employment equity and diversity within its community. All qualified persons are encouraged to apply. We especially welcome applications from members of visible minority groups, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of minority sexual orientations and gender identities, and others with the skills and knowledge to engage productively with diverse communities. Canadian citizens and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority. This position is subject to final budgetary approval. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience.

Deadline: Applications and all supporting materials must be received by January 5, 2016.

Review of applications will begin soon after this date and will continue until the position is filled.

Daniel Heath Justice talk, “Being a Good Relative, Becoming a Good Ancestor: Other-than-Human Kinship and the Decolonial Imperative”

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Dr. Daniel Heath Justice

(First Nations Studies Program and English, University of British Columbia)

“Being a Good Relative, Becoming a Good Ancestor: Other-than-Human Kinship and the Decolonial Imperative”

5-6:30pm, Wed Nov 27, Coach House, Green College, UBC

Abstract: From the nineteenth-century decimation of prairie bison herds and imposition of patriarchal farming techniques to the contemporary decline of coastal fisheries and narrowed concerns of familial obligations, a consistent pattern in Eurowestern political and economic colonialism worldwide has been the targeted suppression of Indigenous kinship relations with the other-than-human. While variously dismissed by colonial agents as “pagan,” “primitive,” or illusory, such expansive familial relations are in fact substantive to and expressive of Indigenous political, ceremonial, and intellectual practices of self-determination and cultural and political distinctiveness. This presentation will consider a few illustrative examples of the other-than-human as a vital concern in Indigenous decolonization and resurgence politics today, while critically engaging the potential consequences of an absence of such considerations in contemporary activism and scholarship.

Speaker Info: Daniel Heath Justice is a Colorado-born Canadian citizen of the Cherokee Nation. He is Chair of the First Nations Studies Program and Associate Professor of First Nations Studies and English at UBC on the traditional, ancestral, and unceded territories of the Musqueam people. His work includes Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History, the Indigenous epic fantasy The Way of Thorn and Thunder: The Kynship Chronicles, and the co-edited anthologies Sovereign Erotics: A Collection of Two-Spirit Literature and, with James H. Cox, the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature. Current projects include a cultural history of badgers and a study of critical kinship in Indigenous literature.

All those attending talks in this series are invited to stay for dinner at Green College with the speaker. Those interested in attending dinner are asked to make a reservation at least by noon the business day before. Contact 604-822-8660 or visit the Green College website for details.

Oecologies: Inhabiting Premodern Worlds is a new Speaker Series sponsored by Green College that gathers scholars from the humanities living and working along the North American Pacific coast to investigate the idea of “oecology,” an older spelling of the modern concept “ecology.” For event details, abstracts, and speaker information, please visit oecologies.com or view the event poster. Also follow us on Twitter (@Oecologies) and “Like” us on Facebook (facebook.com/oecologies)! Oecologies also holds a reading group in advance of each talk in the Speaker Series. If you are interested in attending, please contact Dr. Robert Rouse (robert.rouse@ubc.ca). If you have other questions about Oecologies, please do not hesitate to contact me (nardizzi@mail.ubc.ca) or our assistant, Carmel Ohman (carmelohman@gmail.com).

Instructor – School of Community and Regional Planning – University of British Columbia

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http://www.scarp.ubc.ca/content/faculty-position

Instructor (half-time term appointment)
School of Community and Regional Planning
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, Point Grey Campus

The School of Community and Regional Planning (SCARP) is seeking to recruit a half-time Instructor (term).  The successful applicant should have the ability to design and teach a core course on Introduction to Planning Theory and History, a core course in the recently launched Indigenous Community Planning specialization (Indigenous Community Planning: Ways of Being, Knowing, and Doing), and an elective course (see www.scarp.ubc.ca).  These are Master’s level courses.

A PhD in planning or a related discipline is preferred, as well as previous academic and practice background in community development and social planning with particular emphasis in indigenous community planning.

SCARP is a fully accredited (Canada and USA) graduate planning program within the Faculty of Applied Science. The School’s explicit pedagogical mission is to advance the transition to sustainability through excellence in integrated policy and planning research, professional education, and community service. Sustainability is understood broadly to encompass social, economic, cultural and environmental dimensions, and the School’s teaching and research orientation places emphasis on the development of participatory, community-oriented, planning methods.

Applicants should submit a letter stating career objectives and suitability for the position, including overview of relevant experience and achievements, and approach to teaching. Please also include your current curriculum vitae and names and contact information (including email addresses) of three possible referees. Applicants are encouraged to submit supplementary materials, including a teaching dossier. Please include your website address, if you have one.

The anticipated start date is July 1, 2014. This is a one-year appointment with the possibility of a reappointment.

The closing date for applications is December 1, 2013; applications will be processed as soon as they are received. To apply, please submit your cover letter and CV online at: http://hr.ubc.ca/careers/faculty If you have any questions pertaining to the position please contact: Dr. Penny Gurstein, Director,  School of Community & Regional Planning e-mail: penny.gurstein@ubc.ca UBC hires on the basis of merit and is committed to employment equity. We encourage all qualified applicants to apply, however, Canadians and permanent residents of Canada will be given priority. UBC is strongly committed to diversity within its community and especially welcomes applications from visible minority group members, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of any sexual orientation or gender identity, and others who may contribute to the further diversification of ideas. Please indicate your legal status to work in Canada.

CFP – Canadian Journal of Native Education

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2014 Theme Issue – CALL FOR PAPERSIndigenizing the International Academy

Deadline: April 15, 2014

The Canadian Journal of Native Education (CJNE), is pleased to announce a cooperative editorship for the 2014 CJNE theme issue with:

          Shelly Mukwa Musayett Johnson, University of British Columbia, Canada

          Jo-ann Archibald, Q’um Q’um Xiiem, University of British Columbia, Canada

          Lester-Irabinna Rigney, University of Adelaide, Australia

          Graduate students, University of British Columbia

A five-day invited international Indigenous roundtable conference was held at the University of British Columbia (Vancouver campus) in May 2013. Sponsored primarily by the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, it focused on the theme, Place, belonging and promise: Indigenizing the international academy. This roundtable recognized the contested discourse, tensions, possibilities, and sites related to actions, expectations and aspirations of Indigenous faculty, post-secondary students, community activists, Elders and youth to “Indigenize the Academy”. Indigenous participants came from colonized countries such as Canada, the United States of America (USA), Australia and New Zealand, which were the last Western countries to become signatories to the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The domestic and international dimensions of the roundtable added richness and extended our understandings of the challenges and possibilities of Indigenizing the International Academy.

Throughout the five days, the Indigenous roundtable participants wove five key principles of 1) legal sovereignty, 2) cultural self-determination, 3) activism, 4) rights and 5) reconciliation into their keynotes and discussions to address six core roundtable themes including: 1) Community engagement (How does the academy engage Indigenous knowledges, peoples, and communities?), 2) Teaching/learning (How does this differ between academic and Indigenous contexts?), 3) Research (How does the academy view differences between University vs Indigenous ethics, participants, data?), 4) Governance (What does this mean if the academy does not reflect an Indigenous governance process, or there are no Indigenous peoples at the governance levels in the academy?), 5) Human resources; faculty, staffing & finance (How does the academy deal with Indigenous employees vs non Indigenous employees?), 6. Indigenous student success (What does this mean from Indigenous perspectives vs academic perspectives?)

There is still much to share and learn at the local and international levels; therefore, the 2014 CJNE theme issue invites articles that will extend the examination of Indigenizing the International Academy. Articles do not have to include a comparative examination of local and international contexts; however, they must consider ways that the topic of the article can inform an international context. Questions of interest to this 2014 theme issue include, but are not limited to:

Ø What is the difference between ‘Indigenizing the Academy’ and ‘Indigenizing the International Academy’? Is either possible? How is it/could it be possible?

Ø How can the academy engage Indigenous Knowledges, peoples, and communities in meaningful ways? What are the barriers to such approaches? What are the strategies?

Ø How can a sense of belonging in the academy occur without giving up one’s Indigenous Knowledge and identity?

Ø How can university governance systems include Indigenous peoples and Indigenous approaches?

Ø In which ways can academic teaching/learning, research, and/or community service be transformed through Indigenous Knowledges, peoples, and approaches?

Please send two digital Word copies with abstract: (one digital copy to include name and contact address info and one digital copy without name and contact info for blind review) to indigenous.education@ubc.ca CJNE uses APA style. Submissions should be no longer than 8,000 words in length.

October UBC Museum of Anthropology

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Exhibitions

The Marvellous Real: Art from Mexico, 1926 – 2011
October 25, 2013 – March 30, 2014 | MOA
Opening Reception, Saturday, October 26, 7:00pm – 9:00pm | MOA
In 1949, the Cuban writer and ethno-musicologist, Alejo Carpentier (1904 – 1980), coined the term the “marvellous real” to describe a particular kind of magic realism that is manifest in the arts and everyday life of Latin America. Eluding the expected through bizarre amalgamations, improbable juxtapositions, and fantastic correlations, the marvellous real is, as Carpentier said, “neither beautiful nor ugly; rather, it is amazing because it is strange.” Read more

Speaking to Memory: Images and Voices from St. Michael’s Residential School
Until March 2, 2014 | MOA

This exhibition has grown out of a unique opportunity to present the personal experiences of First Nations children who attended St. Michael’s Indian Residential School. During the late 1930’s, one student at the school had a camera and photographed many of her friends and classmates there. The photos provide a rare and moving glimpse of residential school life through the eyes of students as they made a life for themselves away from families and home communities. Read more

Programs

Opening Reception: The Marvellous Real: Art from Mexico, 1926 – 2011
Saturday, October 26, 7:00pm – 9:00pm | MOA
Join us to celebrate the opening of The Marvellous Real: Art from Mexico, 1926 – 2011. Read moreCurator Tour: Everything Strange, Everything Amazing
Sunday, October 27, 1:00pm – 2:00pm | MOA
Co-curators Nicola Levell and Anthony Shelton will give a tour of the exhibition The Marvellous Real: Art from Mexico, 1926 – 2011, and discuss their unique approach to the display of 20th-century Mexican art. Read moreDia de los Muertos: Day of the Dead Celebration
Saturday, November 2, 11:00am – 4:00pm | MOA
For many traditional Mesoamerican cultures, dying represents a continuation of this life in a different, parallel realm. Every year, these two realms connect in a celebration commonly known as Day of the Dead, a festivity with ancient, pre-Columbian roots. Read more

MOA Staff Tours
Tuesdays | MOA
Learn about MOA’s collections from a different staff member every week. Read more
October 1: Mawuena Glymin, IT Manager
October 8: Mauray Toutloff, Conservator
October 15: Pam Brown, Curator, Pacific Northwest
October 22: Bill McLennan, Curator, Pacific Northwest
October 29: Karen Duffek, Curator, Contemporary Visual Arts & Pacific Northwest