Aboriginal and Indigenous

7th Aboriginal Math Symposium, First Nations Longhouse. 9:00 am – 3:00 pm, May 11, 2017.

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7th Aboriginal Math Symposium

 

Thursday May 11, 2017

First Nations Longhouse

1985 West Mall UBC

9:00 am – 3:00 pm

Please join us for the 7th Aboriginal Math K-12 Symposium at the First Nations Longhouse, UBC on May 11 2017. This symposium is an opportunity for teachers, administrators, Ministry representatives, community members, and academics to connect, explore, imagine and share new ideas, resources and research on Aboriginal mathematics education from kindergarten to Grade 12. Together we hope to:

  • Learn about new research in mathematics and Aboriginal education
  • Discuss and share approaches, research and educational projects for improving Aboriginal math education
  • Develop community connections to facilitate and support improving Aboriginal math education

Please direct questions about the symposium to:

Kwesi Yaro kwesi.yaro@alumni.ubc.ca
Registration open by mid March 2017.

 

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Course – Institute on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples (CUIERIP), June 4-9, 2017.

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Institute on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples (CUIERIP)

 

  • Carleton University launched the Institute on the Ethics of Research with Indigenous Peoples (CUIERIP) in June of 2015. This year’s Summer Institute is being offered as a six-day course from Sunday, June 4th to Friday, June 9th, 2017. The course will have a variety of speakers (such as Margaret Kovach, Gilbert Whiteduck, Don Kelly, Tony Belcourt, and many more) who have expertise in research ethics, community engagement and the program specifically engages with a hands-on approach to learning. Participation is limited to 45 participants and tuition for the six-day program is $1000 excluding transportation and accommodation. A limited number of scholarships are available.

 

Please click on the link for more information.

Morning Coffee and chat with Dr. Dustin Louie – Jan 11, 2017, 10:30-11:30 am

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You are invited to a SAGE morning coffee and chat with Indigenous scholar Dustin Louie, from the University of Calgary Faculty of Education.
Wednesday, January 11, 2017
10:30 to 11:30 am
Boardroom, First Nations Longhouse

 

It is a great chance to meet and chat about his work and maybe ask some questions about new scholar roles and responsibilities.

 

Following the coffee and chat, Dustin will be giving a talk at the Social Justice Institute in the Jack Bell Building on Indigenous girls and their over representation in sexual exploitation and sex trade. Please see attached poster.

2017-Jan11-DustinLouie.jpg

CFP – ab-Original Journal of Indigenous Studies and First Nations’ and First Peoples’ Cultures

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ab-Original Journal Cover

ab-Original

Journal of Indigenous Studies and First Nations’ and First Peoples’ Cultures
    • Jakelin Troy, Editor in Chief
      Lorena Fontaine, Editor
      Adam Geczy, Editor
    • Forthcoming 2017
    • Biannual Publication
    • ISSN 2471-0938
    • E-ISSN 2470-6221

ab-Original: Journal of Indigenous Studies and First Nations’ and First Peoples’ Cultures is a journal devoted to issues of indigeneity in the new millennium. It is a multi-disciplinary journal embracing themes such as art, history, literature, politics, linguistics, health sciences and law. It is a portal for new knowledge and contemporary debate whose audience is not only that of academics and students but professionals involved in shaping policies with regard to concern relating to indigenous peoples.

Each issue will consist of 40-50,000 words. All academic articles should be approximately 6-10,000 words long. An abstract of approximately 150 words must accompany each manuscript. All articles and comprehensive review essays will be peer-reviewed. Opinion pieces or short research reports, which are not peer reviewed, should be approximately 1,500 to 3,000 words in length.

To submit an article, please visit http://www.editorialmanager.com/ab-original. The online system will guide you through the steps to upload your article to the editorial office.

Call for papers, Duranbinjma-Burre: International Indigenous Knowledge Conference, Australia. Due: Sept 30, 2016

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THE WEARURUK RESEARCH CENTRE

INSTITUTE OF KOORIE EDUCATION DEAKIN UNIVERSITY AUSTRALIA CALL FOR PAPERS

Duranbinjma-Burre: International Indigenous Knowledge Conference Australia 26 – 28 June 2017

The interdisciplinary conference, Duranbinjma-Burre: International Indigenous Knowledge Conference Australia to be hosted by the Wearuruk Research Centre at the Institute of Koorie Education Deakin University will examine the impact of Indigenous Knowledge systems and approaches to research across the disciplines of the Humanities and Creative Arts, Education, Health, Law and Philosophy. It aims to extend debates on how Indigenous ontology and epistemology articulate modes of knowledge production that give rise to transforming discourses and have the capacity to solve real world problems.

Leading and emerging Scholars from Australia and overseas will extend the frontiers of this burgeoning paradigm of research through debates on how Indigenous knowledge systems have the potential to reframe western approaches to knowledge by articulating the implications, applications and benefits of indigenous research both within and beyond Indigenous communities and research arenas.

Duranbinjma-Burre denotes the idea of the growing up and nurturing of persons, ideas and entities. This notion is aligned with our aim of illuminating and advancing Indigenous Paradigms of knowledge production and transmission. The question of what new knowledge and understandings Indigenous approaches can reveal that may not be revealed by other modes of research underpins the objectives of this conference. Further questions outlined below and that provide a framework for articulating this are based on the work a group of postgraduate researchers from the Institute of Koorie Education, Deakin University Australia.

Keynote Speakers:

Reality

Distinguished Professor Hingangaroa Smith is an internationally renowned Māori educationalist who has been at the forefront of the alternative Māori initiatives in the education field and beyond. Professor Smith has made significant contributions to the political, social, economic and cultural advancement of Māori communities. He has also worked extensively with other indigenous/ First Nations peoples across the world, including Canada, Hawaii, US mainland, Taiwan, Chile, Australia and the Pacific nations.

Pausauraq Jana Harcharek has worked with the North Slope Borough School District (NSBSD) in the department of Iñupiaq Education for over fifteen years. During this time she facilitated a number of long-term projects including the Iñupiaq Education Initiative that resulted in the development of the Iñupiaq Learning Framework (ILF). Jana has been a critical force in promoting and maintaining the Iñupiaq culture, language and way of life in education.

Professor Norm Sheehan is a Wiradjuri man born in Mudgee NSW. In 2013 Professor Sheehan commenced as Director of Gnibi College of Indigenous Australian Peoples Southern Cross University. Norm’s current Respectful Design research seeks to outline and employ culturally recognisable and affirming methods to activate cultural growth and redirection within communities.

• What is reality? How is it seen and how do meanings emerge from Australian Indigenous Knowledge systems? Art and Symbols

  • What is the importance of symbols, story-telling and art in Indigenous research?
  • How are natural, symbolic, material, spiritual and ceremonial entities related in Indigenous Knowledge systems?
  • How is time viewed in Indigenous Epistemology and ontology?

    Experience

  • In what ways does the researcher’s lived experience influence and validate knowledge emerging from research
  • How does the researcher’s experience operate in relation to the experience of others? Positioning
  • How are men and women positioned in relation to Land and Country?
  • Who is seen and heard in Indigenous research?
  • How do visible/invisible and outsider/insider relations operate
  • Who benefits from the research? Who controls the research and the emergent knowledge?

    Abstracts of 250 words are invited for single authored or co- authored 20–minute presentations that address (though not exclusively nor comprehensively) the above questions for consideration through double blind refereeing. Please also include the title of your paper, a 150- word biography, institutional affiliation and full contact details with your submission
    Presenters will later be invited to submit full papers to be refereed for publication in full conference proceedings.

Please send abstracts by 30 September 2016: Ms Julie Nichols Email: j.nichols@deakin.edu.au

 

 

 

 

Call for Abstracts – Indigenous Studies – Chicago 2016. Due: Apr 30, 2016

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Call for Abstracts
Indigenous Studies Area – Midwest Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Conference, Hilton Rosemont/Chicago O¹Hare from Thursday-Sunday, October 6-9.
Abstract Proposal deadline: April 30, 2016

The Indigenous Studies Area of the Midwest Popular Culture Association seeks panels and paper proposals for the annual Midwest Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association conference, to be at the Hilton Rosemont/Chicago O¹Hare (847-678-4488) from Thursday-Sunday, October 6-9.

Papers may address any aspect of Aboriginal, First Nations, Maori, Sami, and other Indigenous popular cultures. In addition, the area highly encourages comparative papers between Indigenous and, say, Asian, Hispanic, Pacific Islander, or African popular cultures. Topics might address, but are not in any way limited to the following:
Film
Television
New Media
Video Games, Blogging, YouTube
Fashion
Popular Literature
Radio shows
Theater, Festivals, Spectacles, and Ceremonies
Popular Music

250 word abstracts may be submitted before or by April 30, 2016. Submissions should be made electronically via our online submission system, http://submissions.mpcaaca.org.

Send questions and inquiries to the Area Chair, Anthony Adah at adahan@mnstate.edu

For more information about the conference, including how to submit to a different area, please visit the conference website at http://www.mpcaaca.org/conference.

Director, Aboriginal Education, North Island College. Due: Mar 28, 2016

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Posting Preview
Posting Details
Title Director, Aboriginal Education
Posting Number 101116
Posting Date 03-08-2016
Closing Date 03-28-2016
Status Admin-Regular
Position Summary
Reporting to the Assistant Vice President, Access and Regions, the
Director of Aboriginal Education is responsible for the strategic direction of
Aboriginal Education at the College.
Within the context of the College Plan and in conjunction with the Senior
Educational Team (SET), the Director is responsible for the development
and preservation of strategic educational planning relationships with the
First Nations throughout the College region. The Director will implement a
robust process of continuous assessment in program demand in the
pursuit of mutually beneficial opportunities to increase education
accessibility and student enrollment throughout NIC Region. The Director
shall collaborate with Deans, Department Chairs, and the Registrar and
actively participate in the planning of programs, services, policy, and
procedures, which facilitates access, retention, and student success,
within the College community.
The Director is the first point of contact for the Ministry of Advanced
Education, First Nations Councils and School Districts within the College
region on all matters related to Aboriginal education. The Director is
accountable for ensuring the collation of accurate information regarding
the educational needs of the Aboriginal population, sources of funding
available to assist the College in meeting those needs, and collaboration
with SET and those responsible for Aboriginal education, in the
development of funding proposals specifically designed to meet those
needs.
A primary purpose of the position is to build capacity within North Island
College, and to work effectively with First Nations students and faculty
regionally to support and develop the indigenization of the curriculum.
Areas of responsibility include: development of Aboriginal Education Policy
Framework in alignment with CICan Indigenous Protocol commitments;
enhance indigenous-centered services, learning environments, student
and community spaces; and to support the educational goal of First
Nations people in the College region in all matters related to the College
Plan
Please note: The College received special program approval by the BC
Human Rights Tribunal to give preference to the hiring of a person of
Aboriginal ancestry for this position.
Position Competencies – Creates a Positive Climate and Culture
– Effective Communication Skills
– Effectively Develops Goals & Objectives
– Focuses Effectively on Key Results and Priorities
– Demonstrates a Focus on Continuous Improvement
– Interpersonal Effectiveness
– Team Leadership
– Developing Others
– Championing and Adapting to Change
– Collaboration
Duties and Responsibilities
The areas of responsibility include:
1. Educational Leadership;
2. External Communication and Relationship Development;
3. Planning;
4. Financial Management
5. Employee Relations

Description
Required Education & Experience
– The College received special program approval by the BC Human Rights
Tribunal to give preference to the hiring of a person of Aboriginal ancestry
for this position.
– Completion or in progress a Master’s Degree in an appropriate discipline
and demonstrated experience, 3 years’ experience preferred, in a
leadership role in a post-secondary Aboriginal Education setting; which
must include demonstrated management and leadership experience in
Aboriginal Education. Candidates with an undergraduate degree and
considerable experience in Aboriginal Education at a post-secondary
institution, may also be considered.
– A demonstrated record of success in Aboriginal Education and
community development work, resource procurement, grant and proposal
writing and project management.
– Demonstrated experience resolving student concerns, informally and
formally.
Required Knowledge, Skills, & Abilities
– Extensive knowledge of Aboriginal populations within the traditional
territories of thirty-five First Nations inclusive of the Nuu-chah-nulth,
Kwakwaka’wakw and Coast Salish traditions.
– A working knowledge of governance models and related management
approaches.
– Strong interpersonal skills, including communication (written and oral),
negotiation and advocacy skills; particularly in communicating and
consulting with community groups, school districts, industry, local
government agencies, and the College community.
– Demonstrated commitment to collaborative and consultative leadership
and the ability to work effectively within a management team and fastpaced
environment.
– Advanced computer skills as required by the position.
– The ability to plan annual budgets and follow established financial
policies and practices to ensure fiscally responsible management of
expenses.
– The knowledge and ability to implement quality improvement initiatives
and measure outcomes.
– Experience with organizational change practices.
– Experience in the effective management of human resources, within a
unionized workforce and administering collective agreements.
Pay Grade In accordance with the Exempt Administrators’ Salary Scale
Location Campbell River (CR)
Department Assistant Vice-President, Access & Regions
Link to Job Description Director, Aboriginal Education:
https://careers.nic.bc.ca/userfiles/jsp/shared/reports/Report.jsp?time=1457477182219 3/8/2016
Special Instructions to Applicants
Please scan copies of your transcripts into one document for attachment.
If your transcripts are not available at the time of application, please attach
a letter or certificate of confirmation from the educational institution.